Browse Results For:

J

1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 968

:
:
restricted access This search result is for a Book

J. C. Nichols and the Shaping of Kansas City

Innovation in Planned Residential Communities

William S. Worley

Often synonymous with Kansas City is the beautiful and enchanting Country Club Plaza.  This upscale midtown shopping center and surrounding suburban community-which remain the places to shop and live nearly sixty years after their construction-are a testament to the creative genius of J.C. Nichols.  Now available in paper, J.C. Nichols and the Shaping of Kansas City chronicles the success of the man who forever changed the shape of Kansas City and has influenced urban development throughout the United States.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

J.D. Salinger - American Writers 51

University of Minnesota Pamphlets on American Writers

James E. Miller Jr.

J.D. Salinger - American Writers 51 was first published in 1965. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

J. Edgar Hoover Goes to the Movies

The FBI and the Origins of Hollywood's Cold War

by John Sbardellati

Between 1942 and 1958, J. Edgar Hoover's Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted a sweeping and sustained investigation of the motion picture industry to expose Hollywood's alleged subversion of "the American Way" through its depiction of social problems, class differences, and alternative political ideologies. FBI informants (their names still redacted today) reported to Hoover's G-men on screenplays and screenings of such films as Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946), noting that "this picture deliberately maligned the upper class attempting to show that people who had money were mean and despicable characters." The FBI's anxiety over this film was not unique; it extended to a wide range of popular and critical successes, including The Grapes of Wrath (1940), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), Crossfire (1947) and On the Waterfront (1954).

In J. Edgar Hoover Goes to the Movies, John Sbardellati provides a new consideration of Hollywood's history and the post-World War II Red Scare. In addition to governmental intrusion into the creative process, he details the efforts of left-wing filmmakers to use the medium to bring social problems to light and the campaigns of their colleagues on the political right, through such organizations as the Motion Picture Alliance for the Preservation of American Ideals, to prevent dissemination of "un-American" ideas and beliefs.

Sbardellati argues that the attack on Hollywood drew its motivation from a sincerely held fear that film content endangered national security by fostering a culture that would be at best apathetic to the Cold War struggle at best, or, at its worst, conducive to communism at home. Those who took part in Hollywood's Cold War struggle, whether on the left or right, shared one common trait: a belief that the movies could serve as engines for social change. This strongly held assumption explains why the stakes were so high and, ultimately, why Hollywood became one of the most important ideological battlegrounds of the Cold War.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

J. M. Barrie

An Annotated Secondary Bibliography

Cark Markgraf

Sir James Matthew Barrie (1860-1937) is cherished for his delightful children's tale Peter Pan, reprised in numerous forms as

restricted access This search result is for a Book

J. M. Synge and Travel Writing of the Irish Revival

Giulia Bruna

Between the late 1890s and the early 1900s, the young Irish writer John Millington Synge journeyed across his home country, documenting his travels intermittently for ten years. His body of travel writing includes the travel book The Aran Islands, his literary journalism about West Kerry and Wicklow published in various periodicals, and his articles for the Manchester Guardian about rural poverty in Connemara and Mayo. Although Synge’s nonfiction is often considered of minor weight compared with his drama, Bruna argues persuasively that his travel narratives are instances of a pioneering ethnographic and journalistic imagination.

J. M. Synge and Travel Writing of the Irish Revival is the first comprehensive study of Synge’s travel writing about Ireland, compiled during the zeitgeist of the preindependence Revival movement. Bruna argues that Synge’s nonfiction subverts inherited modes of travel writing that put an emphasis on Empire and Nation. Synge’s writing challenges these grand narratives by expressing a more complex idea of Irishness grounded in his empathetic observation of the local rural communities he traveled amongst. Drawing from critically neglected revivalist travel literature, newspapers and periodicals, and visual and archival documents, Bruna sketches a new portrait of a seminal Irish Literary Renaissance figure and sheds new light on the itineraries of activism and literary engagement of the broader Revival movement.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

J.S. Bach. De h-Moll-Messe

Ignace Bossuyt

De fascinerende geschiedenis van Bachs muzikaal testament. Enkele maanden vóór zijn overlijden in 1750 voltooide Johan Sebastian Bach zijn muzikaal testament: de h-Moll-Messe. Hij creëerde hiermee een bewonderenswaardige synthese van de hele geschiedenis van de mis, het genre dat ook toen nog gold als dé toetssteen voor compositorisch vernuft en scherpzinnige tekstinterpretatie. Middeleeuwen, renaissance en barok versmelten in Bachs ultieme meesterwerk tot wellicht de meest universele compositie uit het West-Europese repertoire. Op basis van het recentste onderzoek schetst Ignace Bossuyt de fascinerende ontstaansgeschiedenis van de h-Moll-Messe binnen het historische, muzikale en religieuze kader van Bachs tijd. Hij bespreekt in detail de vijf delen van de mis (Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus en Agnus Dei), fragment per fragment, met aandacht voor zowel de puur muzikale aspecten als de theologische en symbolische duiding van de mistekst. In een apart hoofdstuk gaat hij dieper in op het gebruik van de parodie of de herwerking van vroeger gecomponeerde muziek, een van de basistechnieken die Bach ook hier toepaste. Ten slotte komen we ook te weten hoe de mis onthaald werd vanaf Bachs sterfjaar tot op heden.

 Cover
restricted access This search result is for a Journal

J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

Vol. 1 (2013) through current issue

J19 is the official publication of C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. Published twice annually, the journal will be dedicated to publishing innovative research on and analysis of the "long nineteenth century" (1783-1914).

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Jabotinsky's Children

Polish Jews and the Rise of Right-Wing Zionism

Daniel Kupfert Heller

How interwar Poland and its Jewish youth were instrumental in shaping the ideology of right-wing Zionism

By the late 1930s, as many as fifty thousand Polish Jews belonged to Betar, a youth movement known for its support of Vladimir Jabotinsky, the founder of right-wing Zionism. Poland was not only home to Jabotinsky’s largest following. The country also served as an inspiration and incubator for the development of right-wing Zionist ideas. Jabotinsky’s Children draws on a wealth of rare archival material to uncover how the young people in Betar were instrumental in shaping right-wing Zionist attitudes about the roles that authoritarianism and military force could play in the quest to build and maintain a Jewish state.

Recovering the voices of ordinary Betar members through their letters, diaries, and autobiographies, Jabotinsky’s Children paints a vivid portrait of young Polish Jews and their turbulent lives on the eve of the Holocaust. Rather than define Jabotinsky as a firebrand fascist or steadfast democrat, the book instead reveals how he deliberately delivered multiple and contradictory messages to his young followers, leaving it to them to interpret him as they saw fit. Tracing Betar’s surprising relationship with interwar Poland’s authoritarian government, Jabotinsky’s Children overturns popular misconceptions about Polish-Jewish relations between the two world wars and captures the fervent efforts of Poland’s Jewish youth to determine, on their own terms, who they were, where they belonged, and what their future held in store.

Shedding critical light on a vital yet neglected chapter in the history of Zionism, Jabotinsky’s Children provides invaluable perspective on the origins of right-wing Zionist beliefs and their enduring allure in Israel today.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Jack Benny and the Golden Age of American Radio Comedy

Kathryn H. Fuller-Seeley

The king of radio comedy from the Great Depression through the early 1950s, Jack Benny was one of the most influential entertainers in twentieth-century America. A master of comic timing and an innovative producer, Benny, with his radio writers, developed a weekly situation comedy to meet radio’s endless need for new material, at the same time integrating advertising into the show’s humor. Through the character of the vain, cheap everyman, Benny created a “fall guy,” whose frustrated struggles with his employees addressed mid-century America’s concerns with race, gender, commercialism, and sexual identity. Kathryn H. Fuller-Seeley contextualizes her analysis of Jack Benny and his entourage with thoughtful insights into the intersections of competing entertainment media and argues that transmedia stardom, branded entertainment, and virality are, in fact, the newest versions of key elements in the history of American popular culture.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Jack London

A Writer's Fight for a Better America

Cecelia Tichi

Jack London (1876-1916) found fame with his wolf-dog tales and sagas of the frozen North, but Cecelia Tichi challenges the long-standing view of London as merely a mass-market producer of potboilers. A onetime child laborer, London led a life of poverty in the Gilded Age before rising to worldwide acclaim for stories, novels, and essays designed to hasten the social, economic, and political advance of America. In this major reinterpretation of London's career, Tichi examines how the beloved writer leveraged his written words as a force for the future.

Tracing the arc of London's work from the late 1800s through the 1910s, Tichi profiles the writer's allies and adversaries in the cities, on the factory floor, inside prison walls, and in the farmlands. Thoroughly exploring London's importance as an artist and political and public figure, Tichi brings to life a man who merits recognition as one of America's foremost public intellectuals.

The enhanced e-book edition of Jack London features significant archival motion picture footage.

1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 968

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Titles

J

Content Type

  • (868)
  • (100)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access