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Hands in the Till Cover

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Hands in the Till

Embezzlement of Public Monies in Mississippi

James R. Crockett

In 2004 Corporate Crime Reporter asserted that Mississippi was the most crooked state in America. By comparing the number of federal corruption convictions over the past decade and the 2002 population of the state, the conclusion was inescapable. Too many officials were robbing the public they had sworn to serve and protect.

Hands in the Till: Embezzlement of Public Monies in Mississippi establishes the scope of a major crisis in a poor state where needs are many and funds are scarce. The book highlights the tireless work of the Office of the State Auditor in investigating the theft of public money and bringing criminals to justice.

This book reports on thirty-seven cases that demonstrate how and why embezzlement occurs, how it is discovered and investigated, and how the state's justice system deals with perpetrators. The greedy schemes can be as outrageous as they are disheartening. Case histories narrated here involve a variety of public servants and others including chancery clerks, circuit clerks, justice court clerks, city clerks, sheriffs, tax collectors, school and college administrators, and employees of organizations that receive public money.

James R. Crockett is professor emeritus of accountancy and information systems at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Hands On or Hands Off? Cover

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Hands On or Hands Off?

The Nature and Process of Economic Policy in Hong Kong

Tony Latter

Is Hong Kong's approach to economic policy really as 'hands off' as we are led to believe? How are economic policies determined within Hong Kong's unique governance structure?

Hanging by a Thread Cover

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Hanging by a Thread

A Kite’s View of Wisconsin

This full-color book of photographs records Wisconsin from an unusual viewpoint: a camera suspended from a kite and controlled by photographer Craig M. Wilson from the ground. Taken from fifty to a few hundred feet in the air, Wilson’s photos capture natural and man-made views that wouldn’t otherwise be possible. The result is a vibrant collection that captures Wisconsin in all its shifting beauty in landscapes and cityscapes, festivals, Door County’s lighthouses, Milwaukee’s neighborhoods, and the crowd at a Badger football game. Captions are provided in English, Spanish, German, and Mandarin Chinese.

A Hanging in Nacogdoches Cover

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A Hanging in Nacogdoches

Murder, Race, Politics, and Polemics in Texas's Oldest Town, 1870-1916

By Gary B. Borders

“The contribution of A Hanging in Nacogdoches is not limited to that city, East Texas, or even the state. . . . The purpose of the author's presentation is to show life-race relations, politics, the economy-in a typical . . . Southern town at the transition from the nineteenth to the twentieth century. Borders argues, and demonstrates, that Nacogdoches was, indeed, typical for its time and place.” -Archie P. McDonald, Regent's Professor of History, Stephen F. Austin State University On October 17, 1902, in Nacogdoches, Texas, a black man named James Buchanan was tried without representation, condemned, and executed for the murder of a white family-all in the course of three hours. Two white men played pivotal roles in these events: Bill Haltom, a leading local Democrat and the editor of the Nacogdoches Sentinel, who condemned lynching but defended lynch mobs, and A. J. Spradley, a Populist sheriff who, with the aid of hundreds of state militiamen, barely managed to keep the mob from burning Buchanan alive, only to escort him to the gallows following his abbreviated trial. Each man's story serves to illuminate a part of the path that led to the terrible parody of justice which lies at the heart of A Hanging in Nacogdoches. The turn of the twentieth century was a time of dramatic change for the people of East Texas. Frightened by the Populist Party's attempts to unite poor blacks and whites in a struggle for economic justice, white Democrats defended their power base by exploiting racial tensions in a battle that ultimately resulted in the complete disenfranchisement of the black population of East Texas. In telling the story of a single lynching, Gary Borders dramatically illustrates the way politics and race combined to bring horrific violence to small southern towns like Nacogdoches.

The Hanlon Brothers Cover

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The Hanlon Brothers

From Daredevil Acrobatics to Spectacle Pantomime, 1833-1931

Mark Cosdon

The Hanlon Brothers is the first complete and accurate account of one of the most beloved families in nineteenth-century American theater. The Hanlons evolved a unique theatrical style that combined breath-taking acrobatics with trick scenery, novel illusions, and wild, often violent, knockabout comedy.

Hannah Arendt Cover

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Hannah Arendt

Critical Essays

This work presents both the range of Arendt’s political thought and the patterns of controversy it has elicited. The essays are arranged in six parts around important themes in Arendt’s work: totalitarianism and evil; narrative and history; the public world and personal identity; action and power; justice, equality, and democracy; and thinking and judging. Despite such thematic diversity, virtually all the contributors have made an effort to build bridges between interest-driven politics and Arendt’s Hellenic/existential politics. Although some are quite critical of the way Arendt develops her theory, most sympathize with her project of rescuing politics from both the foreshortening glance of the philosopher and its assimilation to social and biological processes. This volume treats Arendt’s work as an imperfect, somewhat time-bound but still invaluable resource for challenging some of our most tenacious prejudices about what politics is and how to study it. The following eminent Arendt scholars have contributed chapters to this book: Ronald Beiner, Margaret Canovan, Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, Seyla Benhabib, Jürgen Habermas, Hanna Pitkin, and Sheldon Wolin.

Hannah Arendt and Human Rights Cover

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Hannah Arendt and Human Rights

The Predicament of Common Responsibility

Peg Birmingham

"Peg Birmingham's reading of Arendt's work is absolutely unique. She seeks nothing less than an ontological foundation of the political, and in particular, the notion of human rights." -- Bernard Flynn, The New School for Social Research

Hannah Arendt's most important contribution to political thought may be her well-known and often-cited notion of the "right to have rights." In this incisive and wide-ranging book, Peg Birmingham explores the theoretical and social foundations of Arendt's philosophy on human rights. Devoting special consideration to questions and issues surrounding Arendt's ideas of common humanity, human responsibility, and natality, Birmingham formulates a more complex view of how these basic concepts support Arendt's theory of human rights. Birmingham considers Arendt's key philosophical works along with her literary writings, especially those on Walter Benjamin and Franz Kafka, to reveal the extent of Arendt's commitment to humanity even as violence, horror, and pessimism overtook Europe during World War II and its aftermath. This current and lively book makes a significant contribution to philosophy, political science, and European intellectual history.

Hannah Arendt and the Negro Question Cover

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Hannah Arendt and the Negro Question

Kathryn T. Gines

While acknowledging Hannah Arendt's keen philosophical and political insights, Kathryn T. Gines claims that there are some problematic assertions and oversights regarding Arendt’s treatment of the "Negro question." Gines focuses on Arendt's reaction to the desegregation of Little Rock schools, to laws making mixed marriages illegal, and to the growing civil rights movement in the south. Reading them alongside Arendt's writings on revolution, the human condition, violence, and responses to the Eichmann war crimes trial, Gines provides a systematic analysis of anti-black racism in Arendt’s work.

Hanoi Journal, 1967 Cover

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Hanoi Journal, 1967

Carol McEldowney edited by Suzanne Kelley McCormack and Elizabeth R. Mock

In the fall of 1967, Carol McEldowney, a twenty-four-year-old community organizer living in Cleveland, embarked on a remarkable journey. In a climate of growing domestic unrest and international turmoil, she traveled illegally to North Vietnam with fellow members of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) to meet the enemy face-to-face. She was determined to understand the foe that had troubled America's leaders in Washington since the end of World War II. With an eye toward history and a recognition of the significance of her journey, McEldowney documented her experiences in the journal reproduced in this book. Through her words we bear witness to a political ideology that saw a connection between the struggles of the poor in America and the tragedy of war-torn Vietnam. McEldowney first gained the respect of her fellow activists as a student organizer at the University of Michigan. High regard for her intelligence, skill, and hard work with SDS's Economic Recovery Action Program during the years following her graduation in 1964 earned her an invitation to attend an international conference in Czechoslovakia and an offer to continue on to North Vietnam. Though her journal displays only traces of the feminist consciousness that would mark her later political activism, she recorded her observations of North Vietnam clearly aware that she was an outsider—a woman not subject to the military draft, not married to a soldier, and without the heartache of a brother or even a close friend serving in the war. McEldowney searched for glimpses of everyday life that would help her to better relate to women in Hanoi and the hardships they faced during wartime. As she traveled in North Vietnam, she sought a deeper understanding of the events of her time. Her journal provides readers with a unique lens through which to study those events and gain a new perspective on the Vietnam War era.

Hans Jonas’s Ethic of Responsibility Cover

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Hans Jonas’s Ethic of Responsibility

From Ontology to Ecology

Articulates the fundamental importance of ontology to Hans Jonas’s environmental ethics.

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