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Galveston

Ellis Island of the West

While the massive flow of immigrants to the Northeast was taking place, a number of Jews were finding their way to America through the port of Galveston, Texas. The descendants of these immigrants, now scattered throughout the United States, are hardly aware that their ancestors participated in a unique attempt to organize and channel Jewish immigration. From their recruitment in Eastern Europe to their settlement in the American West, these immigrants were supervised by a network of agents and representatives. The project, known as the “Galveston Movement,” brought over ten thousand Jews to the United States between the years 1907 and 1914.

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Galveston Rose

Mary Powell

Vibrant, opinionated, and independent—that’s Galveston widow Rose Parrish. Seventy-six years old and in failing health, Rose is coming to grips with her life. She lives alone in a stately home once full of life; her only companions are her housekeeper, Pearl, her financial advisor, Captain J.J. Broussard, and a young medical student, Jesse Martin.

Mary Powell weaves the separate stories of these people important to Rose into a poignant and often humorous tale of “the good life” and “the good death.”

Preparing for the inevitable, Rose sells all her stock to fund her last adventure; she changes her will to leave Jesse money to finish medical school and to give her house and its valuable antiques to the captain. The captain persuades Rose that they can build the most exciting nightclub and restaurant that Galveston has seen in decades. In the process, his unsavory past comes to light.

For the theme of her new club, Mason Rouge, Rose researches the history of Galveston and the life of Jean Lafitte, the pirate who first established Galveston as a center for smuggling. Maison Rouge, Rose’s last adventure, is a loving tribute to the Galveston of the past as well as the future.

Powell’s rich descriptions of island life, the sometimes-raging weather, and the island’s uniquely spirited past vividly bring Galveston to life as a character all its own.

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The Gambler King of Clark Street

Michael C. McDonald and the Rise of Chicago's Democratic Machine

Richard C. Lindberg with a Foreword by John Miya.

Biography of Michael C. McDonald, nineteenth-century Gambler King of Chicago, who fused the criminal underworld with elements of the city’s supposed political and commercial “Upperworld” into an oily urban machine built on graft, intimidation, bribery, and influence peddling.

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A Gambler’s Instinct

The Story of Broadway Producer Cheryl Crawford

Milly S. Barranger

A Gambler’s Instinct offers a rare glimpse of one of the first female producers in American theater. Active in the Group Theatre, the Actors Studio, and on Broadway, her success with Tennessee Williams plays and the musicals of Kurt Weill and Marc Blitzstein, among others, highlight her persistence and expertise.

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Gambling Debt

Iceland's Rise and Fall in the Global Economy

Gambling Debt is a game-changing contribution to the discussion of economic crises and neoliberal financial systems and strategies. Iceland’s 2008 financial collapse was the first case in a series of meltdowns, a warning of danger in the global order. This full-scale anthropology of financialization and the economic crisis broadly discusses this momentous bubble and burst and places it in theoretical, anthropological, and global historical context through descriptions of the complex developments leading to it and the larger social and cultural implications and consequences. Chapters from anthropologists, sociologists, historians, economists, and key local participants focus on the neoliberal policies—mainly the privatization of banks and fishery resources—that concentrated wealth among a select few, skewed the distribution of capital in a way that Iceland had never experienced before, and plunged the country into a full-scale economic crisis. Gambling Debt significantly raises the level of understanding and debate on the issues relevant to financial crises, painting a portrait of the meltdown from many points of view—from bankers to schoolchildren, from fishers in coastal villages to the urban poor and immigrants, and from artists to philosophers and other intellectuals. This book is for anyone interested in financial troubles and neoliberal politics as well as students and scholars of anthropology, sociology, economics, philosophy, political science, business, and ethics. Publication supported in part by the National Science Foundation. Contributors: Vilhjálmur Árnason, Ásmundur Ásmundsson, Jón Gunnar Bernburg, James Carrier, Sigurlína Davíðsdóttir, Dimitra Doukas, Níels Einarsson, Einar Mar Guðmundsson, Tinna Grétarsdóttir, Birna Gunnlaugsdóttir, Guðný S. Guðbjörnsdóttir, Pamela Joan Innes, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, Örn D. Jónsson, Hannes Lárusson, Kristín Loftsdóttir, James Maguire, Már Wolfgang Mixa, Evelyn Pinkerton, Hulda Proppé, James G. Rice, Rögnvaldur J. Sæmundsson, Unnur Dís Skaptadóttir, Margaret Willson

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Gambling Life

Dealing in Contingency in a Greek City

Thomas M. Malaby

The only ethnography devoted to the practice of gambling as its core subject, Gambling Life considers the stakes of social action in one community on the island of Crete._x000B_Backgammon cafes, card clubs, and hidden gambling rooms in the city of Chania provide the context for Thomas M. Malaby to examine the ways in which people confront uncertainty in their lives. He shows how the dynamics of gambling -- risk, fate, uncertainty, and luck -- are reflected in other aspects of gamblers lives from courtship and mortality to state bureaucracy and national identity._x000B_By moving beyond risk and fate as unexamined analytical categories, Malaby presents a new model for research concerning indeterminacy, seeing it as arising from stochastic, performative, and other sources. Gambling Life questions the longstanding valorization of order and pattern in the social sciences.

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Gambling

Mapping the American Moral Landscape

Alan Wolfe and Erik C. Owens, editors

Why has gambling become so accepted in the U.S. when other historical vices, like smoking and drinking, continue to evoke morality-based opposition? That simple but intriguing question guides this path-breaking volume, the first interdisciplinary academic study of gambling. Led by the renowned Alan Wolfe and with essays by experts at the country’s premiere centers in public policy, clinical addiction, law, gaming, psychology, sociology, moral philosophy, theology, and the arts, Gambling: Mapping the American Moral Landscape is a tour de force of the booming cultural and moral phenomenon that has become woven into the fabric of American life. Both an attempt to understand and an effort to predict its future consequences, the book will prove evocative and critical reading for American civic and church leaders, activists, historians and government officials.

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Gambling on Ore

The Nature of Metal Mining in the United States, 1860–1910

By Kent Curtis

Gambling on Ore examines the development of the western mining industry from the tumultuous and violent Gold Rush to the elevation of large-scale copper mining in the early twentieth century, using Montana as representative of mining developments in the broader US mining west. Employing abundant new historical evidence in key primary and secondary sources, Curtis tells the story of the inescapable relationship of mining to nature in the modern world as the United States moved from a primarily agricultural society to a mining nation in the second half of the nineteenth century.

In Montana, legal issues and politics—such as unexpected consequences of federal mining law and the electrification of the United States—further complicated the mining industry’s already complex relationship to geology, while government policy, legal frameworks, dominant understandings of nature, and the exigencies of profit and production drove the industry in momentous and surprising directions. Despite its many uncertainties, mining became an important part of American culture and daily life.

Gambling on Ore unpacks the tangled relationships between mining and the natural world that gave material possibility to the age of electricity. Metal mining has had a profound influence on the human ecology and the social relationships of North America through the twentieth century and throughout the world after World War II. Understanding how we forged these relationships is central to understanding the environmental history of the United States after 1850. 

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Gambling, Space and Time

Shifting Boundaries and Cultures

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