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Studies by Time Period > 18th Century Studies

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Baroque Horrors Cover

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Baroque Horrors

Roots of the Fantastic in the Age of Curiosities

David R. Castillo

David Castillo takes us on a tour of some horrific materials that have rarely been considered together. He sheds a fantastical new light on the baroque. ---Anthony J. Cascardi, University of California Berkeley "Baroque Horrors is a textual archeologist's dream, scavenged from obscure chronicles, manuals, minor histories, and lesser-known works of major artists. Castillo finds tales of mutilation, mutation, monstrosity, murder, and mayhem, and delivers them to us with an inimitable flair for the sensational that nonetheless rejects sensationalism because it remains so grounded in historical fact." ---William Egginton, Johns Hopkins University "Baroque Horrors is a major contribution to baroque ideology, as well as an exploration of the grotesque, the horrible, the fantastic. Castillo organizes his monograph around the motif of curiosity, refuting the belief that Spain is a country incapable of organized scientific inquiry." ---David Foster, Arizona State University Baroque Horrors turns the current cultural and political conversation from the familiar narrative patterns and self-justifying allegories of abjection to a dialogue on the history of our modern fears and their monstrous offspring. When life and death are severed from nature and history, "reality" and "authenticity" may be experienced as spectator sports and staged attractions, as in the "real lives" captured by reality TV and the "authentic cadavers" displayed around the world in the Body Worlds exhibitions. Rather than thinking of virtual reality and staged authenticity as recent developments of the postmodern age, Castillo looks back to the Spanish baroque period in search for the roots of the commodification of nature and the horror vacui that accompanies it. Aimed at specialists, students, and readers of early modern literature and culture in the Spanish and Anglophone traditions as well as anyone interested in horror fantasy, Baroque Horrors offers new ways to rethink broad questions of intellectual and political history and relate them to the modern age. David Castillo is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. Jacket art: Frederick Ruysch's anatomical diorama. Engraving reproduction "drawn from life" by Cornelius Huyberts. Image from the Zymoglyphic Museum.

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The Eighteenth Century

Vol. 47 (2006) through current issue

The Eighteenth Century fosters theoretical and interpretive research on all aspects of Western culture, 1660-1800. The editors take special interest in essays that apply innovative contemporary methodologies to the study of eighteenth-century literature, history, science, fine arts, and popular culture.

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Eighteenth-Century Life

Vol. 20 (1996) through current issue

With a firm commitment to interdisciplinary exchange, Eighteenth-Century Life addresses all aspects of European and world culture during the long eighteenth century, 1660-1815. The most wide-ranging journal of eighteenth-century studies, it also encourages diverse methodologies--from close reading to cultural studies--and it is always open to suggestions for innovative approaches and special issues. Among Eighteenth-Century Life's noteworthy regular features are its film forums, its review essays, the longest and most eclectic lists of books received of any journal in the field, and its book-length special issues.

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Eighteenth-Century Studies

Vol. 29 (1995/96) through current issue

As the official publication of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), Eighteenth-Century Studies is committed to publishing the best of current writing on all aspects of eighteenth-century culture. The journal selects essays that employ different modes of analysis and disciplinary discourses to explore how recent historiographical, critical, and theoretical ideas have engaged scholars concerned with the eighteenth century.

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Hume Studies

Vol. 1 (1975) through current issue

Hume Studies is an interdisciplinary scholarly journal dedicated to publishing important work bearing on the thought of David Hume. Hume Studies is receptive to a wide variety of topics, methods, and approaches, so long as the work contributes to the understanding of Hume's thought, meets the highest standards of scholarship, and demonstrates mastery of the relevant scholarly literature. Hume Studies is published by the Hume Society in April and November. For more information on joining the Hume Society, please visit www.humesociety.org.

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Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700

Vol. 32 (2008) through current issue

Restoration publishes new work in the field of English letters, arts, culture and society from 1660-1700. The journal appears biannually. Each issue contains scholarly essays; scholarly book reviews; and a unique, comprehensive and annotated bibliography of recent scholarship. We welcome submissions using a variety of methodologies and from diverse points of view that shed new light on Restoration studies.

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The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Vol. 44 (2011) through current issue

Since 1968, The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats has offered imaginative, insightful, and concise reviews of current critical discussion of the English literature of the late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-centuries. The bi-annual journal offers knowledgeable responses to recent criticism of late-seventeenth and early eighteenth-century literary figures (Addison, Behn, Congreve, Dennis, Dryden, Finch, Garth, Gay, Haywood, Hogarth, Mandeville, Montagu, Parnell, Pilkington, Pope, Rochester, Rowe, Rymer, Settle, Shaftesbury, Steele, Swift, Thomson, Toland, and Vanbrugh, as well as the five early novelists (Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Smollett, and Sterne). Notes on the history and culture of the period and bibliographical commentary often accompany the Scriblerian's comprehensive article and book reviews.

Severo Sarduy and the Neo-Baroque Image of Thought in the Visual Arts Cover

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Severo Sarduy and the Neo-Baroque Image of Thought in the Visual Arts

by Rolando Pérez

Severo Sarduy never enjoyed the same level of notoriety as did other Latin American writers like García Márquez and Vargas-Llosa, and his compatriot, Cabrera-Infante. On the other hand, he never lacked for excellent critical interpretations of his work from critics like Roberto González Echevarría, René Prieto, Gustavo Guerrero, and other reputable scholars. Missing, however, from what is otherwise an impressive body of critical commentary, is a study of the importance of painting and architecture, firstly, to his theory, and secondly, to his creative work. In order to fill this lacuna in Sarduy studies, Rolando Pérez’s book undertakes a critical approach to Sarduy’s essays—Barroco, Escrito sobre un cuerpo, “Barroco y neobarroco,” and La simulación—from the stand point of art history. Often overlooked in Sarduy studies is the fact that the twenty-three-year-old Sarduy left Cuba for Paris in 1961 to study not literature but art history, earning the equivalent of a Master’s Degree from the École du Louvre with a thesis on Roman art. And yet it was the art of the Italian Renaissance (e.g., the paintings as well as the brilliant and numerous treatises on linear perspective produced from the 15th to the 16th century) and what Sarduy called the Italian, Spanish, and colonial Baroque or “neo-baroque” visually based aesthetic that interested him and to which he dedicated so many pages. In short, no book on Sarduy until now has traced the multifaceted art historical background that informed the work of this challenging and exciting writer. And though Severo Sarduy and the Neo-Baroque Image of Thought in the Visual Arts is far from being an introduction, it will be a book that many a critic of Sarduy and the Latin American “baroque” will consult in years to come.

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Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture

Vol. 20 (1991) through current issue

Published by the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture is an annual volume that features significantly revised versions of outstanding papers read at national and regional conferences of ASECS and its affiliates. Committed to representing ASECS's wide range of disciplinary interests, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture particularly selects essays that reflect new and highly promising directions of research in the field.

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