We are unable to display your institutional affiliation without JavaScript turned on.
Shibboleth

Shibboleth authentication is only available to registered institutions.

Project MUSE

Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Browse Results For:

Social Sciences > Geography

previous PREV 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 NEXT next

Results 91-100 of 132

:
:
Oregon Geology Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Oregon Geology

Sixth Edition

Elizabeth L. Orr and William N. Orr

Because Oregon sits on the leading edge of a moving crustal plate, a striking diversity of geologic events have molded its topography. Over a century of study, a deeper understanding of the region’s tectonic overprint has emerged. In this timely update to the 2000 edition, Elizabeth and William Orr incorporate that new knowledge, addressing current environmental problems and detailing tectonic hazards. “Caught between converging crustal plates,” the Orrs write, “the Pacific Northwest faces a future of massive earthquakes and tsunamis.”

A comprehensive treatment of the state’s geologic history, Oregon Geology moves through Oregon’s regions to closely examine the unique geologic features of each, from the Blue Mountains to the Willamette Valley, from the high lava Plains to the Coast Range.

The book includes biographical sketches of notable geologists. It is lavishly illustrated and includes an extensive bibliography.

The Orphan Tsunami of 1700 Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

The Orphan Tsunami of 1700

Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America

by Brian Atwater et al.

Time Magazine named Atwater one of the 100 most significant people of 2005 for the tsunami research that culminated in this book. He joins American and Japanese scholars to trace a massive earthquake off the Northwest Coast that spawned a tsunami recorded in Japan. A rich array of graphic detail and narrative explains the creation, action, and lasting effects of earthquakes and tsunamis.

Over the Range Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Over the Range

A History of the Promontory Summit Route of the Pacific

Richard V. Francaviglia

Francaviglia looks anew at the geographical-historical context of the driving of the golden spike in May 1869. He gazes outward from the site of the transcontinental railroad's completion—the summit of a remote mountain range that extends south into the Great Salt Lake. The transportation corridor that for the first time linked America's coasts gave this distinctive region significance, but it anchored two centuries of human activity linked to the area's landscape.

Francaviglia brings to that larger story a geographer's perspective on place and society, a railroad enthusiast's knowledge of trains, a cartographic historian's understanding of the knowledge and experience embedded in maps, and a desert lover's appreciation of the striking basin-and-range landscape that borders the Great Salt Lake.

Penser les territoires Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Penser les territoires

Edited by Paul Cary

Comment penser la diversité des territoires aujourd’hui ? Quel effet la mondialisation et l’économie du savoir ont-elles sur l’organisation territoriale ? Comment rendre compte de la dynamique interne des régions ? Où en sont les réflexions sur les pôles de compétitivité et autres districts industriels ? Les mêmes solutions s’appliquent-elles aux zones rurales et urbaines ? Analysant les plus récentes évolutions qui touchent les territoires, des géographes, sociologues, économistes et historiens de l’Amérique et de l’Europe traitent de ces questions qui animaient le regretté Georges Benko (1953-2009). Les auteurs rendent ainsi un hommage tout particulier à celui qui a contribué à la mise en place d’une nouvelle géographie socioéconomique attentive à la construction sociale de l’espace, notamment par son œuvre phare Les régions qui gagnent (1992), qu’il avait coordonnée avec Alain Lipietz.

Pharsalia Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Pharsalia

An Environmental Biography of a Southern Plantation, 1780-1880

Lynn A. Nelson

Pharsalia, a plantation located in piedmont Virginia at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, is one of the best-documented sites of its kind. Drawing on the exceptionally rich trove of papers left behind by the Massie family, Pharsalia's owners, this case study demonstrates how white southern planters paradoxically relied on capitalistic methods even as they pursued an ideal of agrarian independence. Lynn A. Nelson also shows how the contradictions between these ends and means would later manifest themselves in the southern conservation movement.

Nelson follows the fortunes of Pharsalia's owners, telling how Virginia's traditional extensive agriculture contributed to the soil's erosion and exhaustion. Subsequent attempts to balance independence and sustainability through a complex system of crop rotation and resource recycling ultimately gave way to an intensive, slave-based form of agricultural capitalism.

Pharsalia could not support the Massies' aristocratic ambitions, and it was eventually parceled up and sold off by family members. The farm's story embodies several fundamentals of modern U.S. environmental thought. Southerners' nineteenth-century quest for financial and ecological independence provided the background for conservationists' attempts to save family farming. At the same time, farmers' failure to achieve independence while maximizing profits and crop yields drove them to seek government aid and regulation. These became some of the hallmarks of conservation efforts in the New Deal and beyond.

Pioneering American Wine Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Pioneering American Wine

Writings of Nicholas Herbemont, Master Viticulturist

Nicholas Herbemont Edited by David S. Shields

This volume collects the most important writings on viticulture by Nicholas Herbemont (1771-1839), who is widely considered the finest practicing winemaker of the early United States. Included are his two major treatises on viticulture, thirty-one other published pieces on vine growing and wine making, and essays that outline his agrarian philosophy. Over the course of his career, Herbemont cultivated more than three hundred varieties of grapes in a garden the size of a city block in Columbia, South Carolina, and in a vineyard at his plantation, Palmyra, just outside the city.

Born in France, Herbemont carefully tested the most widely held methods of growing, pruning, processing, and fermentation in use in Europe to see which proved effective in the southern environment. His treatise "Wine Making," first published in the American Farmer in 1833, became for a generation the most widely read and reliable American guide to the art of producing potable vintage.

David S. Shields, in his introductory essay, positions Herbemont not only as important to the history of viticulture in America but also as a notable proponent of agricultural reform in the South. Herbemont advocated such practices as crop rotation and soil replenishment and was an outspoken critic of slave-based cotton culture.

Political Matter Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Political Matter

Technoscience, Democracy, and Public Life

Bruce Braun

Taking seriously the argument that things have politics, Political Matter seeks to develop a fully materialist theory of politics, one that opens new possibilities for imagining the relationship between scientific and political practices. The contributors assert that without such a theory the profusion of complex materials with and through which we live-plastic bags, smart cars, and long-life lightbulbs, for example-too often leaves us oscillating between fearful repudiation and glib celebration.
Exploring the frictions that come from linking the work of scholars in science and technology studies and political theory, these essays spark new ways of understanding the matter of politics.

Contributors: Andrew Barry, U of Oxford; Jane Bennett, Johns Hopkins U; Stephen J. Collier, New School; William E. Connolly, Johns Hopkins U; Rosalyn Diprose, U of New South Wales; Lisa Disch, U of Michigan; Gay Hawkins, U of New South Wales; Andrew Lakoff, UC San Diego; Noortje Marres, U of London; Isabelle Stengers, U Libre de Bruxelles; Nigel Thrift, U of Warwick.

The Politics of the Encounter Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

The Politics of the Encounter

Urban Theory and Protest under Planetary Urbanization

Andy Merrifield

The Politics of the Encounter is a spirited interrogation of the city as a site of both theoretical inquiry and global social struggle. The city, writes Andy Merrifield, remains "important, virtually and materially, for progressive politics." And yet, he notes, more than forty years have passed since Henri Lefebvre advanced the powerful ideas that still undergird much of our thinking about urbanization and urban society. Merrifield rethinks the city in light of the vast changes to our planet since 1970, when Lefebvre's seminal Urban Revolution was first published. At the same time, he expands on Lefebvre's notion of "the right to the city," which was first conceived in the wake of the 1968 student uprising in Paris.

We need to think less of cities as "entities with borders and clear demarcations between what's inside and what's outside" and emphasize instead the effects of "planetary urbanization," a concept of Lefebvre's that Merrifield makes relevant for the ways we now experience the urban. The city—from Tahrir Square to Occupy Wall Street—seems to be the critical zone in which a new social protest is unfolding, yet dissenters' aspirations are transcending the scale of the city physically and philosophically. Consequently, we must shift our perspective from "the right to the city" to "the politics of the encounter," says Merrifield. We must ask how revolutionary crowds form, where they draw their energies from, what kind of spaces they occur in—and what kind of new spaces they produce.

Portland in Three Centuries Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Portland in Three Centuries

The Place and the People

Carl Abbott

A compact and comprehensive history of Portland from first European contact to the twenty-first century, Portland in Three Centuries/ introduces the women and men who have shaped Oregon’s largest city.

The expected politicians and business leaders appear in Portland in Three Centuries—William Ladd and Edgar Kaiser, George Baker and Vera Katz. But Carl Abbott also highlights workers and immigrants, union members and dissenters, women at work and in the public realm, artists and activists, and other movers and shakers.

Incorporating social history and contemporary scholarship in his narrative, Abbott examines current metropolitan character and issues, giving close attention to historical background. He explores the context of opportunities and problems that have helped to shape the rich mosaic that is Portland.

A highly readable character study of a city, and enhanced by more than sixty historic and contemporary images, Portland in Three Centuries will appeal to readers interested in Portland, in Oregon, and in Pacific Northwest history.

Postcards from the Río Bravo Border Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Postcards from the Río Bravo Border

Picturing the Place, Placing the Picture, 1900s–1950s

By Daniel D. Arreola

Making innovative use of an extensive archive of photo postcards, this historical geography traces the transformation of Mexican border towns into modern cities and destinations for American tourists in the twentieth century.

previous PREV 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 NEXT next

Results 91-100 of 132

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (127)
  • (5)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access