We are unable to display your institutional affiliation without JavaScript turned on.
Shibboleth

Shibboleth authentication is only available to registered institutions.

Project MUSE

Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Browse Results For:

Social Sciences > Criminology

previous PREV 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 NEXT next

Results 91-100 of 315

:
:
Doing Time in the Depression Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Doing Time in the Depression

Everyday Life in Texas and California Prisons

As banks crashed, belts tightened, and cupboards emptied across the country, American prisons grew fat. Doing Time in the Depression tells the story of the 1930s as seen from the cell blocks and cotton fields of Texas and California prisons, state institutions that held growing numbers of working people from around the country and the world—overwhelmingly poor, disproportionately non-white, and displaced by economic crisis.

Ethan Blue paints a vivid portrait of everyday life inside Texas and California’s penal systems. Each element of prison life—from numbing boredom to hard labor, from meager pleasure in popular culture to crushing pain from illness or violence—demonstrated a contest between keepers and the kept. From the moment they arrived to the day they would leave, inmates struggled over the meanings of race and manhood, power and poverty, and of the state itself. In this richly layered account, Blue compellingly argues that punishment in California and Texas played a critical role in producing a distinctive set of class, race, and gender identities in the 1930s, some of which reinforced the social hierarchies and ideologies of New Deal America, and others of which undercut and troubled the established social order. He reveals the underside of the modern state in two very different prison systems, and the making of grim institutions whose power would only grow across the century.

Domestic Violence Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Domestic Violence

Methodologies in Dialogue

Chitra Raghavan

This volume introduces and critiques the various methodologies employed in current research on domestic violence. By discussing different methodologies side by side as they are applied to the same aspect of domestic violence, and by examining diverse populations (including international samples and sexual minorities), the editors provide insight into the political, sociological, and psychological tensions that influence our understanding of domestic violence. In an integrative pedagogical style, they demonstrate how methods, results, and interpretative frames inform current debates in this field, and how such debates further affect researchers' agendas and preferences. Finally, building on these insights, the book provides readers with a broad and balanced approach to selecting the most appropriate methodology for their inquiries, given the wide range of advantages and shortcomings.

Developed for classroom use at both introductory and more advanced levels, each chapter is preceded by learning objectives and followed by critical-thinking questions. Each topic concludes with a commentary by the editors that evaluates methodologies by establishing dialogues between them.

Downsizing Prisons Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Downsizing Prisons

How to Reduce Crime and End Mass Incarceration

Michael Jacobson

Over two million people are incarcerated in America’s prisons and jails, eight times as many since 1975. Mandatory minimum sentencing, parole agencies intent on sending people back to prison, three-strike laws, for-profit prisons, and other changes in the legal system have contributed to this spectacular rise of the general prison population.

After overseeing the largest city jail system in the country, Michael Jacobson knows first-hand the inner workings of the corrections system. In Downsizing Prisons, he convincingly argues that mass incarceration will not, as many have claimed, reduce crime nor create more public safety. Simply put, throwing away the key is not the answer.

Droits et voix - Rights and Voices Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Droits et voix - Rights and Voices

La criminologie

V

Cet ouvrage souligne le 40e anniversaire du Département de criminologie de l’Université d’Ottawa, fondé en 1968. On y relate l’histoire du département de ses origines à nos jours en mettant l’accent sur les débats théoriques qui ont influencé son approche critique et autoréflexive de la criminologie. Les articles qui le composent s’inscrivent dans cet ordre d’idée en mettant en question la perspective traditionnelle de la criminologie sur divers sujets, notamment les études policières, la santé mentale, la violence politique, le suicide et la prévention du crime. Droits et voix souligne le rôle primordial que joue l’Université d’Ottawa dans la redéfinition de la criminologie et la promotion du militantisme, de la justice sociale et de la compassion. -- This volume commemorates the 40th anniversary of the University of Ottawa’s Department of Criminology, founded in 1968. It relates the history of the department from its origins to today, focusing on the theoretical debates that have influenced its critical and self reflexive approach to criminology. The contributions to this volume continue in that vein by questioning the traditional perspective of criminology on a variety of topics including police studies, mental health, political violence, suicide, and crime prevention. Rights and Voices reveals the significant role that the University of Ottawa has played in redefining criminology to advocate activism, social justice, and compassion.

Drug Smugglers on Drug Smuggling Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Drug Smugglers on Drug Smuggling

Lessons from the Inside

Scott H. Decker

Drug Smugglers on Drug Smuggling features interviews with 34 convicted drug smugglers -- most of them once major operators -- detailing exactly how drugs are smuggled into the U.S. from Latin America.  These sources provide tangible evidence of the risks, rewards, and organization of international drug smuggling.

Quoting frequently from their interviews, Decker and Chapman explain how individuals are recruited into smuggling, why they stay in it, and how their roles change over time.  They describe the specific strategies their interviewees employed to bring drugs into the country and how they previously escaped apprehension.  Over-all, the authors find that drug smuggling is organized in a series of networks which are usually unconnected.

This extraordinarily informative book will be of particular interest to law enforcement officials and policymakers, but it will appeal to anyone who wants to know how the drug business actually works.

Dying Inside Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Dying Inside

The HIV/AIDS Ward at Limestone Prison

Benjamin Fleury-Steiner

The HIV+ men incarcerated in Limestone Prison's Dorm 16 were put there to be forgotten. Not only do Benjamin Fleury-Steiner and Carla Crowder bring these men to life, Fleury-Steiner and Crowder also insist on placing these men in the middle of critical conversations about health policy, mass incarceration, and race. Dense with firsthand accounts, Dying Inside is a nimble, far-ranging and unblinking look at the cruelty inherent in our current penal policies. ---Lisa Kung, Director, Southern Center for Human Rights "The looming prison health crisis, documented here at its extreme, is a shocking stain on American values and a clear opportunity to rethink our carceral approach to security." ---Jonathan Simon, University of California, Berkeley "Dying Inside is a riveting account of a health crisis in a hidden prison facility." ---Michael Musheno, San Francisco State University, and coauthor of Deployed "This fresh and original study should prick all of our consciences about the horrific consequences of the massive carceral state the United States has built over the last three decades." ---Marie Gottschalk, University of Pennsylvania, and author of The Prison and the Gallows "An important, bold, and humanitarian book." ---Alison Liebling, University of Cambridge "Fleury-Steiner makes a compelling case that inmate health care in America's prisons and jails has reached the point of catastrophe." ---Sharon Dolovich, University of California, Los Angeles "Fleury-Steiner's persuasive argument not only exposes the sins of commission and omission on prison cellblocks, but also does an excellent job of showing how these problems are the natural result of our nation's shortsighted and punitive criminal justice policy." ---Allen Hornblum, Temple University, and author of Sentenced to Science Dying Inside brings the reader face-to-face with the nightmarish conditions inside Limestone Prison's Dorm 16---the segregated HIV ward. Here, patients chained to beds share their space with insects and vermin in the filthy, drafty rooms, and contagious diseases spread like wildfire through a population with untreated---or poorly managed at best---HIV. While Dorm 16 is a particularly horrific human rights tragedy, it is also a symptom of a disease afflicting the entire U.S. prison system. In recent decades, prison populations have exploded as Americans made mass incarceration the solution to crime, drugs, and other social problems even as privatization of prison services, especially health care, resulted in an overcrowded, underfunded system in which the most marginalized members of our society slowly wither from what the author calls "lethal abandonment." This eye-opening account of one prison's failed health-care standards is a wake-up call, asking us to examine how we treat our forgotten citizens and compelling us to rethink the American prison system in this increasingly punitive age.

Eleven Days in Hell Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Eleven Days in Hell

The 1974 Carrasco Prison Siege at Huntsville, Texas

William T. Harper

From one o’clock on the afternoon of July 24, 1974, until shortly before ten o’clock the night of August 3, eleven days later, one of the longest hostage-taking sieges in the history of the United States took place in Texas’s Huntsville State Prison. The ringleader, Federico (Fred) Gomez Carrasco, the former boss of the largest drug-running operation in south Texas, was serving life for assault with intent to commit murder on a police officer. Using his connections to smuggle guns and ammunition into the prison, and employing the aid of two other inmates, he took eleven prison workers and four inmates hostage in the prison library. Demanding bulletproof helmets and vests, he planned to use the hostages as shields for his escape. Negotiations began immediately with prison warden H. H. Husbands and W. J. Estelle, Jr., Director of the Texas Department of Corrections. The Texas Rangers, the Department of Public Safety, and the FBI arrived to assist as the media descended on Huntsville. When one of the hostages suggested a moving structure of chalkboards padded with law books to absorb bullets, Carrasco agreed to the plan. The captors entered their escape pod with four hostages and secured eight others to the moving barricade. While the target was en route to an armored car, Estelle had his team blast it with fire hoses. In a violent end to the standoff, Carrasco committed suicide, one of his two accomplices was killed (the other later executed), and two hostages were killed by their captors.

Empire of Scrounge Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Empire of Scrounge

Inside the Urban Underground of Dumpster Diving, Trash Picking, and Street Scavenging

Jeff Ferrell

“Patrolling the neighborhoods of central Fort Worth, sorting through trash piles, exploring dumpsters, scanning the streets and the gutters for items lost or discarded, I gathered the city's degraded bounty, then returned home to sort and catalogue the take.”
—From the Introduction

In December of 2001 Jeff Ferrell quit his job as tenured professor, moved back to his hometown of Fort Worth, Texas, and, with a place to live but no real income, began an eight-month odyssey of essentially living off of the street. Empire of Scrounge tells the story of this unusual journey into the often illicit worlds of scrounging, recycling, and second-hand living. Existing as a dumpster diver and trash picker, Ferrell adopted a way of life that was both field research and free-form survival. Riding around on his scrounged BMX bicycle, Ferrell investigated the million-dollar mansions, working-class neighborhoods, middle class suburbs, industrial and commercial strips, and the large downtown area, where he found countless discarded treasures, from unopened presents and new clothes to scrap metal and even food.

Richly illustrated throughout, Empire of Scrounge is both a personal journey and a larger tale about the changing values of American society. Perhaps nowhere else do the fault lines of inequality get reflected so clearly than at the curbside trash can, where one person's garbage often becomes another's bounty. Throughout this engaging narrative, full of a colorful cast of characters, from the mansion living suburbanites to the junk haulers themselves, Ferrell makes a persuasive argument about the dangers of over-consumption. With landfills overflowing, today’s highly disposable culture produces more trash than ever before—and yet the urge to consume seems limitless.

In the end, while picking through the city's trash was often dirty and unpleasant work, unearthing other people's discards proved to be unquestionably illuminating. After all, what we throw away says more about us than what we keep.

The Enigma Woman Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

The Enigma Woman

The Death Sentence of Nellie May Madison

Kathleen A. Cairns

Environmental Change Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Environmental Change

previous PREV 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 NEXT next

Results 91-100 of 315

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (314)
  • (1)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access