Reappraisals: Canadian Writers

Published by: University of Ottawa Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

Reappraisals: Canadian Writers

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 21-30 of 31

:
:
restricted access This search result is for a Book

Other Selves

Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination

Edited by Janice Fiamengo

Other Selves: Animals in the Canadian Literary Imagination begins with the premise, first suggested by Margaret Atwood in The Animals in That Country (1968), that animals have occupied a peculiarly central position in the Canadian imagination. Unlike the longer-settled countries of Europe or the more densely-populated United States, in Canada animals have always been the loved and feared co-inhabitants of this harsh, beautiful land. From the realistic animal tales of Charles G. D. Roberts and Ernest Thompson Seton, to the urban animals of Marshall Saunders and Dennis Lee, to the lyrical observations of bird enthusiasts John James Audubon, Thomas McIlwraith, and Don McKay, animals have occupied a key place in Canadian literature, focusing central aspects of our environmental consciousness and cultural symbolism. Other Selves explores how and what the animals in this country have meant through all genres and periods of Canadian writing, focusing sometimes on individual texts and at other times on broader issues. Tackling more than a century of writing, from 19th-century narrative of women travellers, to the "natural" conversion of Grey Owl, to the award-winning novels of Farley Mowat, Marian Engel, Timothy Findley, Barbara Gowdy, and Yann Martel, these essays engage the reader in this widely-acknowledged but inadequately-explored aspect of Canadian literature.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Re(dis)covering Our Foremothers

Nineteenth-Century Canadian Women's Writers

Edited and with an introduction by Lorraine McMullen

The modern literary searchlight has flushed out Canada’s long neglected nineteenth century female writers. New critical approaches are advocated and others are encouraged to take on the difficulties – and rewards – of research into the lives of our foremothers.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

RE: Reading the Postmodern

Canadian Literature and Criticism after Modernism

Edited by Robert David Stacey

It would be difficult to exaggerate the worldwide impact of postmodernism on the fields of cultural production and the social sciences over the last quarter century—even if the concept has been understood in various, even contradictory, ways. An interest in postmodernism and postmodernity has been especially strong in Canada, in part thanks to the country’s non-monolithic approach to history and its multicultural understanding of nationalism, which seems to align with the decentralized, plural, and open-ended pursuit of truth as a multiple possibility as outlined by Jean-François Lyotard. In fact, long before Lyotard published his influential work The Postmodern Condition in 1979, Canadian writers and critics were employing the term to describe a new kind of writing. RE: Reading the Postmodern marks a first cautious step toward a history of Canadian postmodernism, exploring the development of the idea of the postmodern and debates about its meaning and its applicability to various genres of Canadian writing, and charting its decline in recent years as a favoured critical trope.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Reflections

Autobiography and Canadian Literature

Edited and with an introduction by K. P. Stich

This volume discusses the autobiographical inclination in Canadian literature, exploring works by such writers as Alice Munro, W.O. Mitchell, Michael Ondaatje, John Glassco, and Susanna Moodie. Others works, including the oral memoirs of a Métis, an Inuit’s account as being civil servant in Ottawa, and the autobiographical writings of pioneer women and French missionaries are examined to show the depth and breadth of this tradition in Canada. These texts act as starting points for an indepth look at the relationships between autobiography, biography and fiction in Canadian literature.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Robertson Davies

A Mingling of Contrarieties

Edited by Camille La Bossière and Linda M. Morra

This collection of essays on the writing of Robertson Davies addresses the basic problems in reading his work by looking at the topics of doubling, disguise, irony, paradox, and dwelling in "gaps" or spaces "in between." The essays present new insights on a broad range of topics in Davies' oeuvre and represent one of the first major discussions devoted to Davies' work since his death in 1995.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Shakespeare in Canada

Remembrance of Ourselves

With contributions by Annie Brisset, Richard Cavell, Dana M. Colarusso, Daniel Fischlin, Troni Y. Grande, Peter Kuling, Sarah Mackenzie, C. E. McGee, Don Moore, Robert Ormsby, Ian Rae, Tom Scholte, and Kailin Wright.

Shakespeare in Canada is the result of a collective desire to explore the role that Shakespeare has played in Canada over the past two hundred years, but also to comprehend the way our country’s culture has influenced our interpretation of his literary career and heritage. What function does Shakespeare serve in Canada today? How has he been reconfigured in different ways for particular Canadian contexts?

The authors of this book attempt to answer these questions while imagining what the future might hold for William Shakespeare in Canada. Covering the Stratford Festival, the cult CBC television program Slings and Arrows, major Canadian critics such as Northrop Frye and Marshall McLuhan, the influential acting teacher Neil Freiman, the rise of Québécois and First Nation approaches to Shakespeare, and Shakespeare’s place in secondary schools today, this collection reflects the diversity and energy of Shakespeare’s afterlife in Canada.

Collectively, the authors suggest that Shakespeare continues to offer Canadians “remembrance of ourselves.” This is a refreshingly original and impressive contribution to Shakespeare studies—a considerable achievement in any work on the history of one of the central figures in the western literary canon.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Stephen Leacock

A Reappraisal

Edited and with an introduction by David Staines

This collection of essays explores the many dimensions of the writings of Stephen Leacock, the well-loved Canadian author of Sunshine Sketches of a Little Town.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

The Thomas Chandler Haliburton Symposium

Edited and with an introduction by Frank Tierney

Thomas Chandler Haliburton was perhaps the only Canadian writer whose name was a household word in nineteenth-century Canada. The ten papers in this volume reappraise the historical, geographical, political and literary contexts within which Haliburton lived and worked. His letters, his historical books, the Club papers and Sam Slick sketches are all included in these valuable and lively criticisms.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Windows and Words

A Look at Canadian Children's Literature in English

Edited by Aïda Hudson and Susan-Ann Cooper

This collection of essays confirms and celebrates the artistry of Canadian children's literature. Contributors include Janet Lunn and Tim Wynne-Jones.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

The Worlds of Carol Shields

David Staines

"Carol was a very fine writer and a remarkable human being, a wonderful person whose work I closely followed for more than 20 years. I interviewed her frequently over those years, with virtually every work she produced —novel, radio drama, play, book of stories. So I had a good sense of the span of her work and also her evolution as a stylist. But the key reason I wanted to make a book focusing on her life and work is that we were friends."
—Eleanor Wachtel

This book strikes the right balance between intimate accounts and literary analysis. It opens with reminiscences by close friend Eleanor Wachtel, which are followed by a study of Shields’ poetry by her daughter and grandson, then by various aspects of her fiction, including a detailed examination of her plays. It closes with reminiscences by four close friends: Jane Urquhart, Joan Clark, Wayson Choy and Martin Levin.

The 23 contributors offer new insights, new theories, and new perspectives about Shields’ illuminating career. Only one piece—her obituary written by Margaret Atwood—has been previously published.

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 21-30 of 31

:
:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

Reappraisals: Canadian Writers

Content Type

  • (31)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access