Grover E. Murray Studies in the American

Published by: Texas Tech University Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

Grover E. Murray Studies in the American

1

Results 1-5 of 5

:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Dancin' in Anson

A History of the Texas Cowboys' Christmas Ball

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

In the Shadow of the Carmens

Afield with a Naturalist in the Northern Mexican Mountains

Bonnie Reynolds McKinney, with foreword by David H. Riskind

Just across the Rio Grande from West Texas in the state of Coahuila, México, the mountain ranges of the Maderas del Carmen rise majestically. Often called magical or mystical, they have stirred imagination for centuries. Stories of bandits, Indians, ghosts, incredible flora and fauna, cool forests, waterfalls, and vast woodlands filter across the Rio Grande.Many people have dreamed of exploring this vast ecosystem, but few have made the trip. Bonnie McKinney is among the fortunate. In 2001 McKinney and her husband, Billy Pat McKinney, moved to the Carmens to manage the large conservation project spearheaded by CEMEX, the Monterrey-based cement and building materials conglomerate. Like those before her, she had been enthralled by the massive mountains with their cliffs of purple and gold in the sunset, and by horizon views of high forests. She, too, wondered what treasures the mountains held. Having lived and worked in the Carmens for nearly a decade, McKinney has never been disappointed by these mountains, which never fail to surprise her. In lavish photographs and loving words McKinney takes readers on a fascinating armchair journey, Introduction byducing them to the incredible biodiversity of this jewel of northern México.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

My Wild Life

A Memoir of Adventures within America's National Parks

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Seat of Empire

The Embattled Birth of Austin, Texas

Jeffrey Stuart Kerr

In 1838 Texas vice president Mirabeau B. Lamar, flush from the excitement of a successful buffalo hunt, gazed from a hilltop toward the paradise at his feet and saw the future. His poetic eye admired the stunning vista before him, with its wavering prairie grasses gradually yielding to clusters of trees, then whole forests bordering the glistening Colorado River in the distance. Lamar’s equally awestruck companions, no strangers to beautiful landscapes, shuffled speechlessly nearby. But where these men saw only nature’s handiwork, Lamar visualized a glorious manmade transformation--trees into buildings, prairie into streets, and the river itself into a bustling waterway. And he knew that with the presidency of the Republic of Texas in his grasp, he would soon be in position to achieve this vision.
     The founding of Austin sparked one of the Republic’s first great political battles, pitting against each other two Texas titans: Lamar, who in less than a year had risen to vice president from army private, and Sam Houston, the hero of San Jacinto and a man both loved and hated throughout the Republic.

     The shy, soft-spoken, self-righteous Lamar dreamed of a great imperial capital in the wilderness, but to achieve it faced the hardships of the frontier, the mighty Comanche nation, the Mexican army, and the formidable Houston’s political might.

1

Results 1-5 of 5

:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

Grover E. Murray Studies in the American

Content Type

  • (5)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access