Indiana University Press

Philanthropic and Nonprofit Studies

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Philanthropy for Health in China

Foreword by Peter Geithner and Wang Zhenyao. Edited by Jennifer Ryan, Lincoln C. Chen, and Tony Saich

Drawing on the expertise of Chinese and Western academics and practitioners, the contributors to this volume aim to advance the understanding of philanthropy for health in China in the 20th century and to identify future challenges and opportunities. Considering government, NGO leaders, domestic philanthropists, and foreign foundations, the volume examines the historical roots and distinct stages of philanthropy and charity in China, the health challenges philanthropy must address, and the role of the Chinese government, including its support for Government Organized Non-Governmental Organizations (GONGOs). The editors discuss strategies and practices of international philanthropy for health; the role of philanthropy in China’s evolving health system; and the prospects for philanthropy in a country beginning to engage with civil society.

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Philanthropy in the World’s Traditions

Edited by Warren F. Ilchman, Stanley Katz, and Edward L. Queen II

"The cross-cultural understandings this book provides can do much to help us determine the distinctive shape and form American religious philanthropy might take in the future." —Christian Century

"The provocative information challenges the assumptions that philanthropy is a primarily Western or Christian tradition, and it clarifies the need for additional study." —Choice

An investigation of how cultures outside the Western tradition understand philanthropy and how people in these cultures attempt to realize "the good" through giving and serving. These essays study philanthropy in Buddhist, Islamic, Hindu, Jewish, and Native American religious traditions and in cultures from Latin America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia.

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Philanthropy, Patronage, and Civil Society

Experiences from Germany, Great Britain, and North America

Edited by Thomas Adam

In Philanthropy, Patronage, and Civil Society, Thomas Adam has assembled a comparative set of case studies that challenge long-held and little-studied assumptions about the modern development of philanthropy. Histories of philanthropy have often neglected European patterns of giving and the importance of financial patronage to the emergence of modern industrialized societies. It has long been assumed, for example, that Germany never developed civic traditions of philanthropy as in the United States. In truth, however, 19th-century German museums, art galleries, and social housing projects were not only privately founded and supported, they were also blueprints for the creation of similar public institutions in North America. The comparative method of the essays also reveals the extent to which the wealthy classes on both sides of the Atlantic defined themselves through their philanthropic activities.

Contributors are Thomas Adam, Maria Benjamin Baader, Karsten Borgmann, Tobias Brinkmann, Brett Fairbairn, Eckhardt Fuchs, David C. Hammack, Dieter Hoffmann, Simone Lässig, Margaret Eleanor Menninger, and Susannah Morris.

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Private Charity and Public Inquiry

A History of the Filer and Peterson Commissions

Eleanor L. Brilliant

Private Charity and Public Inquiry
A History of the Filer and Peterson Commissions
Eleanor L. Brilliant

The story of two commissions that had a major impact on philanthropic activity and public policy.

In the midst of the tumultuous 1960s, the United States Congress turned its attention to issues of tax policy and philanthropy, with special focus on abuses and responsibilities of philanthropic foundations. During the period marked by passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969, John D. Rockefeller 3rd was one of the staunchest defenders of philanthropy in public and in behind-the-scenes lobbying in Washington. This book is a history of two major commissions initiated by Rockefeller: The Commission on Foundations and Private Philanthropy (1969-1970), dubbed "The Peterson Commission" after its chairman, Peter G. Peterson; and The Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs (1973-1977), headed by John H. Filer, and known as "The Filer Commission."

Brilliant analyzes the significance of the two commissions with regard to philanthropy and public policy, and in light of the value that Americans place on voluntary associations. Using original documents of the two commissions, archival material, and extensive interviews with key informants, Brilliant shows how powerful individuals and groups influence tax policy in the United States. Her analysis provides new insights into the two sides of philanthropy doing good and getting rewarded for it through tax benefits.

Eleanor L. Brilliant, Professor of Social Work at Rutgers University, teaches courses on social policy, management, organization theory, and women's issues. She is on the Graduate Faculty of Rutgers University and is a member of the Women's Studies Faculty. She is currently Vice President for Administration/Secretary of ARNOVA. Among her major publications are The United Way: Dilemmas of Organized Charity and The Urban Development Corporation: Private Interests and Public Authority. She is completing a national study of women's funds and the Women's Funding Network.

Philanthropic Studies -- Dwight F. Burlingame and David C. Hammack, editors

Contents
Preface
Note on Archival Sources
Introduction
Point and Counterpoint: Charities, New Committees, and Tax Policy
Leading to Reform: Patman, Treasury, and Congress
The Gathering Storm
In Whose Interest?
Law and Regulation
The Peterson Commission: A Summation
After the TRA: Emergence of a New Commission
The Filer Commission in Action
Filer Commission Follow Up: Missed Opportunities and Emergent New Groups
Lessons from the Past and Issues for the Future

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Religion in Philanthropic Organizations

Family, Friend, Foe?

Edited by Thomas J. Davis

Religion in Philanthropic Organizations explores the tensions inherent in religious philanthropies across a variety of organizations and examines the effect assumptions about "professional" philanthropy have had on how religious philanthropies carry out their activities. Among the organizations discussed are the Salvation Army, the World Council of Churches, and Catholic Charities USA. The essays focus on the work of one individual, Robert Pierce, founder of World Vision and Samaritan's Purse, and on more general matters such as philanthropy and Jewish identity, American Muslim philanthropy since 9/11, and the federal program that funds faith-based initiatives. The book sheds light on how religion and philanthropy function in American society, shaping and being shaped by the culture and its notions of the "common good."

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Religious Giving

For Love of God

Edited by David H. Smith

Religious Giving considers the connection between religion and giving within the Abrahamic traditions. Each contributor begins with the assumption that there is something inherently right or natural about the connection. But what exactly is it? To whom should we give, how much should we give, what is the relationship between our giving and our relationship to God? Writing for the introspective donor, congregational leader, or student interested in ways of meeting human needs, the authors focus on the philosophical or theological dimensions of giving. The contributors' goal is not to report on institutional practices, but to provide thoughtful, constructive guidance to the reader -- informed by a critical understanding of the religious traditions under review.

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Rockefeller Philanthropy and Modern Biomedicine

International Initiatives from World War I to the Cold War

Edited by William H. Schneider

The eight case studies in this edited volume show in detail how the Rockefeller Foundation's gifts affected medical research, education, and public health in Europe, the Soviet Union, and China between World War I and the Cold War. Despite the Foundation's goal to help countries with established medical research programs, major advances were achieved in several countries that did not have a notable history in medical research. In other circumstances, however, the Rockefeller Foundation was confronted with local cultural and political imperatives that reshaped or weakened its objectives. Rockefeller Philanthropy and Modern Biomedicine offers important lessons regarding the situations in which international philanthropy is likely to be most effective.

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To Export Progress

The Golden Age of University Assistance in the Americas

Daniel C. Levy

"An immensely valuable and detailed analysis of foreign, mainly American, assistance to Latin American higher education, To Export Progress provides an understanding of the 'what' and the 'why' of foreign aid to a key sector. This book will be a classic in its field." -- Philip G. Altbach, Monan Professor of Higher Education, Boston College

"Professor Daniel C. Levy, a leading authority in the field of higher education and the nonprofit sector in Latin America, once again has opened an otherwise neglected field through his carefully researched and reported study of philanthropic support for university reform in the region. Drawing on a wealth of archival material, documentary evidence, interviews, and first hand experience with the actors and agencies involved, To Export Progress illuminates the vision and ideals inspiring international agencies, as much as the realities they confronted in deciding on grants and loans policy, from the 1960s to the 1980s. The book is strongly recommended for scholars and students of international education, for Latin American experts, and for philanthropic managers and educational administrators in the developing world." -- Jorge Balan, Senior Program Officer for Higher Education, The Ford Foundation.

In this study of the attempts to export the modern Western university, its ideas, and its form to the Third World, Daniel C. Levy examines the development assistance provided by the Ford Foundation, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Inter-American Development Bank and their relations with local partners in Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s. Levy considers the funders, how they selected partners, which countries and institutions were favored, and to what effect. Based on meticulous research and careful analysis, the book provides a detailed look at philanthropic assistance to the region during the era of modernization and development in Latin America.

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Understanding Philanthropy

Its Meaning and Mission

Robert L. Payton and Michael P. Moody

Philanthropy has existed in various forms in all cultures and civilizations throughout history, yet most people know little about it and its distinctive place in our lives. Why does philanthropy exist? Why do people so often turn to philanthropy when we want to make the world a better place? In essence, what is philanthropy? These fundamental questions are tackled in this engaging and original book. Written by one of the founding figures in the field of philanthropic studies, Robert L. Payton, and his former student sociologist Michael P. Moody, Understanding Philanthropy presents a new way of thinking about the meaning and mission of philanthropy. Weaving together accessible theoretical explanations with fascinating examples of philanthropic action, this book advances key scholarly debates about philanthropy and offers practitioners a way of explaining the rationale for their nonprofit efforts.

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Voluntarism, Community Life, and the American Ethic

Robert S. Ogilvie

"This is a major contribution to the literature on social participation and voluntary action. It is the first systematic ethnographic study I know that treats volunteers and the institutions they create." -- John Van Til, author of Growing Civil Society

"Students and faculty interested in the issue of homelessness will find the book instructive... Recommended." -- Choice

Why do people volunteer, and what motivates them to stick with it? How do local organizations create community? How does voluntary participation foster moral development in volunteers to create a better citizenry? In this fascinating study of volunteers at the Partnership for the Homeless in New York City, Robert S. Ogilvie provides bold and engaging answers to these questions. He describes how volunteer programs such as the Partnership generate ethical development in and among participants and how the Partnership's volunteers have made it such a continued success since the early 1980s. Ogilvie's examination of voluntarism suggests that the American ethic is essential for sustaining community life and to the future well-being of a democratic society.

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