Indiana University Press

Philanthropic and Nonprofit Studies

Published by: Indiana University Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

Philanthropic and Nonprofit Studies

previous PREV 1 2 3 NEXT next

Results 11-20 of 28

:
:
restricted access This search result is for a Book

Making the Nonprofit Sector in the United States

A Reader

Edited with Introductions by David C. Hammack

"It is a delight to seen an anthology on nonprofit history done so well."—Barry Karl, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

"This is a volume that everyone concerned about nonprofits—scholar, practitioner, and citizen—will find useful and illuminating."—Peter Dobkin Hall, Program on Non-Profit Organizations
Yale Divinity School

"A remarkable book."—Robert Putnam, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

[One to come from John Simon, School of Law, Yale University by Jan. 13th and others are being solicited.]

Unique among nations, America conducts almost all of its formally organized religious activity, and many cultural, arts, human service, educational, and research activities through private nonprofit organizations. Though partially funded by government, as well as by fees and donations, American nonprofits have pursued their missions with considerable independence. Many have amassed remarkable resources and acquired some of the most impressive hospital, university, performing arts, and museum facilities in the world. While some have amassed large endowments, many that surpass one billion dollars, there are also hundreds of thousands of small nonprofits, most with no tangible resources at all.

How did the United States come to rely so heavily on nonprofits? Why has it continued to do so? What purposes do Americans seek to advance through nonprofits? How have Americans sought to control them? How have nonprofits been effected by the growth of government in the twentieth century? These questions suggest the complexity of the history of nonprofits in the United States. To help explore that history, this reader presents some of the classic documents in the development of the nonprofit sector along with important interpretations by recent scholars. The selections can be considered a representative part of a single extended conversation by the men and women who have taken part in the effort to define America and the American dream, even as they shaped what we now call the nonprofit sector. The statements by participants in the growth and development of the nonprofit sector are accompanied by essays written by historians and social scientists that provide concise surveys of important issues and periods. The essays give voice to those whose contributions to the American debate about voluntary associations and private institutions would otherwise be difficult to find or comprehend.

The selections can be considered a representative part of a single extended conversation by the men and women who have taken part in the effort to define America and the American dream, even as they shaped what we now call the nonprofit sector. The statements by participants in the growth and development of the nonprofit sector are accompanied by essays written by historians and social scientists that provide concise surveys of important issues and periods. The essays give voice to those whose contributions to the American debate about voluntary associations and private institutions would otherwise be difficult to find or comprehend.

Each selection has been chosen to define or illuminate important questions in the development of the nonprofit sector in the United States. Many include criticisms of particular nonprofit efforts, or of nonprofit activity in general. The intention is to provoke thought, not to establish an official list of readings. Though not every point of view could be included, the reader does reflect a general understanding of the nature of the nonprofit sector and its significance in the development of the United States.

Philanthropic Studies—Dwight F. Burlingame and David C. Hammack, general editors

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Mrs. Russell Sage

Women's Activism and Philanthropy in Gilded Age and Progressive Era America

Ruth Crocker

This is the biography of a ruling-class woman who created a new identity for herself in Gilded Age and Progressive Era America. A wife who derived her social standing from her robber-baron husband, Olivia Sage managed to fashion an image of benevolence that made possible her public career. In her husband's shadow for 37 years, she took on the Victorian mantle of active, reforming womanhood. When Russell Sage died in 1906, he left her a vast fortune. An advocate for the rights of women and the responsibilities of wealth, for moral reform and material betterment, she took the money and put it to her own uses. Spending replaced volunteer work; suffrage bazaars and fundraising fêtes gave way to large donations to favorite causes. As a widow, Olivia Sage moved in public with authority. She used her wealth to fund a wide spectrum of progressive reforms that had a lasting impact on American life, including her most significant philanthropy, the Russell Sage Foundation.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Nonprofits in Crisis

Economic Development, Risk, and the Philanthropic Kuznets Curve

Nuno S. Themudo

Why do some countries have a vibrant nonprofit sector while others do not? Nonprofits in Crisis explores the theory of risk as a major mechanism through which economic development influences the nonprofit sector. Nuno S. Themudo elaborates this idea by focusing on Mexican nonprofit organizations, which operate and strive to survive in a risky environment. The study of these nonprofits generates broader lessons about philanthropy and the nonprofit sector that complement wider cross-national statistical analysis.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Philanthropic Discourse in Anglo-American Literature, 1850-1920

Edited by Frank Q. Christianson and Leslee Thorne-Murphy

From the mid-19th century until the rise of the modern welfare state in the early 20th century, Anglo-American philanthropic giving gained an unprecedented measure of cultural authority as it changed in kind and degree. Civil society took on the responsibility for confronting the adverse effects of industrialism, and transnational discussions of poverty, urbanization, women’s work, and sympathy provided a means of understanding and debating social reform. While philanthropic institutions left a transactional record of money and materials, philanthropic discourse yielded a rich corpus of writing that represented, rationalized, and shaped these rapidly industrializing societies, drawing on and informing other modernizing discourses including religion, economics, and social science. Showing the fundamentally transatlantic nature of this discourse from 1850 to 1920, the authors gather a wide variety of literary sources that crossed national and colonial borders within the Anglo-American range of influence. Through manifestos, fundraising tracts, novels, letters, and pamphlets, they piece together the intellectual world where philanthropists reasoned through their efforts and redefined the public sector.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Philanthropy for Health in China

Foreword by Peter Geithner and Wang Zhenyao. Edited by Jennifer Ryan, Lincoln C. Chen, and Tony Saich

Drawing on the expertise of Chinese and Western academics and practitioners, the contributors to this volume aim to advance the understanding of philanthropy for health in China in the 20th century and to identify future challenges and opportunities. Considering government, NGO leaders, domestic philanthropists, and foreign foundations, the volume examines the historical roots and distinct stages of philanthropy and charity in China, the health challenges philanthropy must address, and the role of the Chinese government, including its support for Government Organized Non-Governmental Organizations (GONGOs). The editors discuss strategies and practices of international philanthropy for health; the role of philanthropy in China’s evolving health system; and the prospects for philanthropy in a country beginning to engage with civil society.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Philanthropy in the World’s Traditions

Edited by Warren F. Ilchman, Stanley Katz, and Edward L. Queen II

"The cross-cultural understandings this book provides can do much to help us determine the distinctive shape and form American religious philanthropy might take in the future." —Christian Century

"The provocative information challenges the assumptions that philanthropy is a primarily Western or Christian tradition, and it clarifies the need for additional study." —Choice

An investigation of how cultures outside the Western tradition understand philanthropy and how people in these cultures attempt to realize "the good" through giving and serving. These essays study philanthropy in Buddhist, Islamic, Hindu, Jewish, and Native American religious traditions and in cultures from Latin America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Philanthropy, Patronage, and Civil Society

Experiences from Germany, Great Britain, and North America

Edited by Thomas Adam

In Philanthropy, Patronage, and Civil Society, Thomas Adam has assembled a comparative set of case studies that challenge long-held and little-studied assumptions about the modern development of philanthropy. Histories of philanthropy have often neglected European patterns of giving and the importance of financial patronage to the emergence of modern industrialized societies. It has long been assumed, for example, that Germany never developed civic traditions of philanthropy as in the United States. In truth, however, 19th-century German museums, art galleries, and social housing projects were not only privately founded and supported, they were also blueprints for the creation of similar public institutions in North America. The comparative method of the essays also reveals the extent to which the wealthy classes on both sides of the Atlantic defined themselves through their philanthropic activities.

Contributors are Thomas Adam, Maria Benjamin Baader, Karsten Borgmann, Tobias Brinkmann, Brett Fairbairn, Eckhardt Fuchs, David C. Hammack, Dieter Hoffmann, Simone Lässig, Margaret Eleanor Menninger, and Susannah Morris.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Private Charity and Public Inquiry

A History of the Filer and Peterson Commissions

Eleanor L. Brilliant

Private Charity and Public Inquiry
A History of the Filer and Peterson Commissions
Eleanor L. Brilliant

The story of two commissions that had a major impact on philanthropic activity and public policy.

In the midst of the tumultuous 1960s, the United States Congress turned its attention to issues of tax policy and philanthropy, with special focus on abuses and responsibilities of philanthropic foundations. During the period marked by passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1969, John D. Rockefeller 3rd was one of the staunchest defenders of philanthropy in public and in behind-the-scenes lobbying in Washington. This book is a history of two major commissions initiated by Rockefeller: The Commission on Foundations and Private Philanthropy (1969-1970), dubbed "The Peterson Commission" after its chairman, Peter G. Peterson; and The Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs (1973-1977), headed by John H. Filer, and known as "The Filer Commission."

Brilliant analyzes the significance of the two commissions with regard to philanthropy and public policy, and in light of the value that Americans place on voluntary associations. Using original documents of the two commissions, archival material, and extensive interviews with key informants, Brilliant shows how powerful individuals and groups influence tax policy in the United States. Her analysis provides new insights into the two sides of philanthropy doing good and getting rewarded for it through tax benefits.

Eleanor L. Brilliant, Professor of Social Work at Rutgers University, teaches courses on social policy, management, organization theory, and women's issues. She is on the Graduate Faculty of Rutgers University and is a member of the Women's Studies Faculty. She is currently Vice President for Administration/Secretary of ARNOVA. Among her major publications are The United Way: Dilemmas of Organized Charity and The Urban Development Corporation: Private Interests and Public Authority. She is completing a national study of women's funds and the Women's Funding Network.

Philanthropic Studies -- Dwight F. Burlingame and David C. Hammack, editors

Contents
Preface
Note on Archival Sources
Introduction
Point and Counterpoint: Charities, New Committees, and Tax Policy
Leading to Reform: Patman, Treasury, and Congress
The Gathering Storm
In Whose Interest?
Law and Regulation
The Peterson Commission: A Summation
After the TRA: Emergence of a New Commission
The Filer Commission in Action
Filer Commission Follow Up: Missed Opportunities and Emergent New Groups
Lessons from the Past and Issues for the Future

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Religion in Philanthropic Organizations

Family, Friend, Foe?

Edited by Thomas J. Davis

Religion in Philanthropic Organizations explores the tensions inherent in religious philanthropies across a variety of organizations and examines the effect assumptions about "professional" philanthropy have had on how religious philanthropies carry out their activities. Among the organizations discussed are the Salvation Army, the World Council of Churches, and Catholic Charities USA. The essays focus on the work of one individual, Robert Pierce, founder of World Vision and Samaritan's Purse, and on more general matters such as philanthropy and Jewish identity, American Muslim philanthropy since 9/11, and the federal program that funds faith-based initiatives. The book sheds light on how religion and philanthropy function in American society, shaping and being shaped by the culture and its notions of the "common good."

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Religious Giving

For Love of God

Edited by David H. Smith

Religious Giving considers the connection between religion and giving within the Abrahamic traditions. Each contributor begins with the assumption that there is something inherently right or natural about the connection. But what exactly is it? To whom should we give, how much should we give, what is the relationship between our giving and our relationship to God? Writing for the introspective donor, congregational leader, or student interested in ways of meeting human needs, the authors focus on the philosophical or theological dimensions of giving. The contributors' goal is not to report on institutional practices, but to provide thoughtful, constructive guidance to the reader -- informed by a critical understanding of the religious traditions under review.

previous PREV 1 2 3 NEXT next

Results 11-20 of 28

:
:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

Philanthropic and Nonprofit Studies

Content Type

  • (28)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access