Temple University Press

Global Ethics and Politics (GEP)

Carol Gould

Published by: Temple University Press

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The Ethics of Care

A Feminist Approach to Human Security

Fiona Robinson

In The Ethics of Care, Fiona Robinson demonstrates how the responsibilities of sustaining life are central to the struggle for basic human security. She takes a unique approach, using a feminist lens to challenge gender biases in rights-based, individualist approaches.Robinson's thorough and impassioned consideration of care in both ethical and practical terms provides a starting point for understanding and addressing the material, emotional and psychological conditions that create insecurity for people. The Ethics of Careexamines “care ethics” and “security” at the theoretical level and explores the practical implications of care relations for security in a variety of contexts: women's labor in the global economy, humanitarian intervention and peace building, healthcare, and childcare.

Theoretically-innovative and policy-relevant, this critical analysis demonstrates the need to understand the obstacles and inequalities that obstruct the equitable and adequate delivery of care around the world.

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Self-Determination without Nationalism

A Theory of Postnational Sovereignty

This book constitutes a critique of the illusions of globalists and cosmopolitans, especially the idea that a new world order based on universal principles of justice and rights, and devoid of nations, states, and power struggles, is possible. It presents the argument that particular political communities are an ethically desirable and historically inevitable feature of collective life (Chs. 4-5). However, the ethical principles that govern them, especially self-determination and sovereignty, require reformulation. The book presents an argument that nation-states violate the principle of self-determination, an idea best understood as justifying minority rights and patriotic attachments, not nationalism (Chs. 1-3). Self-determination is also understood as entailing a new concept of ecosovereignty. This idea is meant to capture the need for a new understanding of political community that can protect and further the rights of indigenous peoples, and the needs of ecological regions for a sustainable form of development and security from environmental destruction (Chs. 6-8).

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