University of Nebraska Press

European Horizons

Published by: University of Nebraska Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

European Horizons

1

Results 1-2 of 2

:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Heideggerian Marxism

Herbert Marcuse

The Frankfurt School philosopher Herbert Marcuse (1898–1979) studied with Martin Heidegger at Freiburg University from 1928 to 1932 and completed a dissertation on Hegel’s theory of historicity under Heidegger’s supervision. During these years, Marcuse wrote a number of provocative philosophical essays experimenting with the possibilities of Heideggerian Marxism. For a time he believed that Heidegger’s ideas could revitalize Marxism, providing a dimension of experiential concreteness that was sorely lacking in the German Idealist tradition. Ultimately, two events deterred Marcuse from completing this program: the 1932 publication of Marx’s early economic and philosophical manuscripts, and Heidegger’s conversion to Nazism a year later. Heideggerian Marxism offers rich and fascinating testimony concerning the first attempt to fuse Marxism and existentialism.
 
These essays offer invaluable insight concerning Marcuse’s early philosophical evolution. They document one of the century’s most important Marxist philosophers attempting to respond to the “crisis of Marxism”: the failure of the European revolution coupled with the growing repression in the USSR. In response, Marcuse contrived an imaginative and original theoretical synthesis: “existential Marxism.”

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Stalinism and Nazism

History and Memory Compared

Henry Rousso

In this volume Europe’s leading modern historians offer new insights into two totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century that have profoundly affected world history—Nazi Germany and the Stalinist Soviet Union. Until now historians have paid more attention to the similarities between these two regimes than to their differences. Stalinism and Nazism explores the difficult relationship between the history and memory of the traumas inflicted by Nazi and Soviet occupation in several Eastern European countries in the twentieth century.
 
The first part of the volume explores the origins, nature, and organization of Hitler’s and Stalin’s dictatorial power, the manipulation of violence by the state systems, and the comparative power of the dictator’s personal will and the encompassing totalitarian system. The second part examines the legacies of the Nazi and Stalinist regimes in Eastern European countries that experienced both. Stalinism and Nazism features the latest critical perspectives on two of the most influential and deadly political regimes in modern history.

1

Results 1-2 of 2

:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

European Horizons

Content Type

  • (2)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access