State University of New York Press

SUNY series in National Identities

Thomas M. Wilson

Published by: State University of New York Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

SUNY series in National Identities

1

Results 1-9 of 9

:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Being Goral

Identity Politics and Globalization in Postsocialist Poland

The Góral ethnic identity has been at the center of political machinations in Poland for centuries. The late Pope John Paul II, for example, was a Góral. This is the first book-length study of the Góral identity and one of the few studies in English to discuss Górals. Through personal interviews, local manuscripts, and academic histories of the region, author Deborah Cahalen Schneider shows how important the Góral identity has been to Poland’s history. The conflict over the Góral identity in the community of Zùywiec, Poland serves as a lens through which Schneider views national identity issues and class conflict in Poland at large. The Góral identity not only gave this community a sense of togetherness under the Habsburg Empire, but also was a symbol of Polish identity for Polish nationalists during that time. Schneider shows how the Góral identity has spanned the rise and, arguably, the fall of nationalism as the primary discourse of political identity in the post–Cold War, European Union–dominated Eastern Europe.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Best of All Possible Islands, The

Seville's Universal Exposition, the New Spain, and the New Europe

The 1992 world’s fair in Seville serves as a vantage point from which to examine Spain’s developing democracy and Europe’s emerging unification, according to Richard Maddox in The Best of All Possible Islands. Visited by over fourteen million people, the Seville Expo drew the participation of more than one hundred countries and dozens of corporations. As part of Spain’s “miraculous year” in which Barcelona hosted the summer Olympics and Madrid was designated the Cultural Capital of Europe, the Expo advanced a remarkably optimistic, cosmopolitan, and liberal vision of the past, present, and future of the “new Spain” and the “new Europe.” Yet no aspect of this vision went unchallenged, and the Expo was at the center of fierce political rivalries and dramatic manifestations of popular discontent. In an engaging and accessible narrative, Richard Maddox demonstrates how visitors and local residents understood the significance of the event in ways that largely escaped the knowledge and control of the Expo’s organizers. Understanding how and why this occurred casts critical light on the transformation of Spain since the end of the Franco dictatorship in 1976 and illuminates some of the key cultural and political dilemmas that processes of European and global integration pose for citizens of democratic societies.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Elites, Language, and the Politics of Identity

The Norwegian Case in Comparative Perspective

Why and when do linguistic cleavages within a nation become politicized? Using Norway—where language has played a particularly salient role in the nation’s history—as a case study, Gregg Bucken-Knapp explores these questions and challenges the notion that the politicization of language conflict is a response to language problems. He shows that political elites often view language conflict as a political opportunity, placing it on the policy agenda as an effective mobilizing tool to serve their own nonlinguistic political ends. Although language-oriented interest groups may fight to achieve desired language policies, they are generally unsuccessful when their preferences clash with the broader objectives of political elites. This book focuses on understanding just how language policies emerge.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Emancipating Cultural Pluralism

Combining detailed case studies with discussions of deeper theoretical controversies, Emancipating Cultural Pluralism investigates both the benign and harmful aspects of identity politics. This provocative collection delves into some of the most difficult issues of cultural pluralism, such as what accounts for the immense power of identity politics, whether identity politics can be inherently good or evil, whether states are the right institutions to deal with ethnic conflict, the prevention of genocide, the value of devolving power to the local level, and more. The contributions are united by the conviction that more attention needs to be paid to the normative issues associated with various expressions of cultural pluralism, for the ethical implications of the phenomena are too profound to be ignored.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Homelessness, Citizenship, and Identity

The Uncanniness of Late Modernity

In the aftermath of September 11, donations to the poor and homeless have declined while ordinances against begging and sleeping in public have increased. The increased security of public spaces has been matched by a quest for increased security and surveillance of immigrants. In this groundbreaking study, Kathleen R. Arnold explores homelessness in terms of the globalization of the economy, national identity, and citizenship. She argues that domestic homelessness and conditions of statelessness, such as refugees, exiles, and poor immigrants, are defined and addressed in similar ways by the political sphere, in such a manner that each of these groups are subjected to policies that perpetuate their exclusion. Drawing on such authors as Freud, Marx, Foucault, Derrida, Lévinas, and Agamben, Arnold argues for a radical politics of homelessness based on extending hospitality and the toleration of difference.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Marxism and National Identity

Socialism, Nationalism, and National Socialism during the French Fin de Siecle

Post-Marxists argue that nationalism is the black hole into which Marxism has collapsed at today’s “end of history.” Robert Stuart analyzes the origins of this implosion, revealing a shattering collision between Marxist socialism and national identity in France at the close of the nineteenth century. During the time of the Boulanger crisis and the Dreyfus affair, nationalist mobs roamed the streets chanting “France for the French!” while socialist militants marshaled proletarians for world revolution. This is the first study to focus on those militants as they struggled to reconcile Marxism’s two national agendas: the cosmopolitan conviction that “workingmen have no country,” on the one hand, and the patriotic assumption that the working class alone represents national authenticity, on the other. Anti-Semitism posed a particular problem for such socialists, not least because so many workers had succumbed to racist temptation. In analyzing the resultant encounter between France’s anti-Semites and the Marxist Left, Stuart addresses the vexed issue of Marxism’s involvement with political anti-Semitism.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Nationalism and Self-Government

The Politics of Autonomy in Scotland and Catalonia

Scotland and Catalonia, both ancient nations with strong nationalisms within larger states, are exemplars of the management of ethnic conflict in multinational democracies and of global trends toward regional government. Focusing on these two countries, Scott L. Greer explores why nationalist mobilization arose when it did and why it stopped at autonomy rather than statehood. He challenges the notion that national identity or institutional design explains their relative success as stable multinational democracies and argues that the key is their strong regional societies and their regional organizations’ preferences for autonomy and environmental stability.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Paradoxes of Nationalism, The

The French Revolution and Its Meaning for Contemporary Nation Building

The Paradoxes of Nationalism explores a critical stage in the development of the principle of national self-determination: the years of the French Revolution, during which the idea of the nation was fused with that of self-government. While scholars and historians routinely cite the French Revolution as the origin of nationalism, they often fail to examine the implications of this connection. Chimène I. Keitner corrects this omission by drawing on history and political theory to deepen our understanding of the historical and normative underpinnings of national self-determination as a basis for international political order. Based on this analysis, Keitner constructs a framework for evaluating nation-based claims in contemporary world politics and identifies persistent theoretical and practical tensions that must be taken into account in contemplating proposals for “civic nationalism” and alternative, nonnational models.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Slavophile Thought and the Politics of Cultural Nationalism

Susanna Rabow-Edling examines the first theory of the Russian nation, formulated by the Slavophiles in the second quarter of the nineteenth century, and its relationship to the West. Using cultural nationalism as a tool for understanding Slavophile thinking, she argues that a Russian national identity was not shaped in opposition to Europe in order to separate Russia from the West. Rather, it originated as an attempt to counter the feeling of cultural backwardness among Russian intellectuals by making it possible for Russian culture to assume a leading role in the universal progress of humanity. This reinterpretation of Slavophile ideas about the Russian nation offers a more complex image of the role of Europe and the West in shaping a Russian national identity.

1

Results 1-9 of 9

:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

SUNY series in National Identities

Content Type

  • (9)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access