State University of New York Press

SUNY series in Theology and Continental Thought

Douglas L. Donkel

Published by: State University of New York Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

SUNY series in Theology and Continental Thought

1

Results 1-9 of 9

:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Beyond Theodicy

Jewish and Christian Continental Thinkers Respond to the Holocaust

Explores the work of post-Holocaust Jewish and Christian thinkers who reject theodicy—arguments explaining why a loving God can permit evil and suffering in the world. Beyond Theodicy analyzes the rising tide of objections to explanations and justifications for why God permits evil and suffering in the world. In response to the Holocaust, striking parallels have emerged between major Jewish and Christian thinkers centering on practical faith approaches that offer meaning within suffering. Author Sarah K. Pinnock focuses on Jewish thinkers Martin Buber and Ernst Bloch and Christian thinkers Gabriel Marcel and Johann Baptist Metz to present two diverse rejections of theodicy, one existential, represented by Buber and Marcel, and one political, represented by Bloch and Metz. Pinnock interweaves the disciplines of philosophy of religion, post-Holocaust thought, and liberation theology to formulate a dynamic vision of religious hope and resistance.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Broken Whole, The

Philosophical Steps Toward a Theology of Global Solidarity

In an increasingly precarious global situation, and in light of the postmodern emphasis on difference, efforts to grasp the “whole” as something universally shared by all human beings have fallen short, according to Thomas E. Reynolds. In this book, he explores the philosophical and theological significance of the problem of pluralism and asserts that the shared resources of the world’s religious traditions can be used to cultivate peace and solidarity across diverse boundaries. He engages a range of philosophical thinkers—such as Gadamer, Marcel, Rorty, Foucault, Levinas, Derrida, and Habermas—and brings them into conversation with contemporary theologians and writers in religious studies. Presenting a vision of solidarity that is both religiously charged and philosophically astute, The Broken Whole outlines an inventive approach toward retrieving the relevance of God-talk, an approach rooted in a philosophy of dialogue and cross-cultural hospitality.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Dante and Derrida

Face to Face

Reading Dante’s Commedia alongside Jacques Derrida’s later religious writings, Francis J. Ambrosio explores what these works reveal about religion as a fundamental dynamic of human existence, about freedom and responsibility, and about the significance of writing itself. Ambrosio argues that both the many telling differences between them and the powerful bonds that unite them across centuries show that Dante and Derrida share an identity as religious writers that arises from the human experiences of faith, hope, and love in response to the divine mystery of being human. For both Dante and Derrida, Ambrosio contends, “scriptural religion” reveals that the paradoxical tension of freedom and absolute responsibility must lead to the mystery of forgiveness, a secret that these two share and faithfully keep by surrendering to its necessity to die so as always to begin again anew.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Gods and Technology, The

A Reading of Heidegger

The Gods and Technology is a careful and original reading of the principal statement of Martin Heidegger’s philosophy of technology, the essay Die Frage nach der Technik (“The question concerning technology”). That essay is a rich one, and Richard Rojcewicz’s goal is to mine it for the treasures only a close reading of the original German text can bring out. Rojcewicz shows how the issue of technology is situated at the very heart of Heidegger’s philosophical enterprise; especially for the late Heidegger, the philosophy of technology is a philosophy of Being, or of the gods. For Heidegger, technology is not applied knowledge, but the most basic knowledge, of which science, for example, is an application. The ultimate goal of this study, and, as Rojcewicz writes, of Heidegger’s thought, is practical: to find the appropriate response to the challenges of the modern age, to learn to live in a technological world without falling victim to the thrall of technological things.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Kierkegaard's Philosophy of Becoming

Movements and Positions

Søren Kierkegaard’s proposal of “repetition” as the new category of truth signaled the beginning of existentialist thought, turning philosophical attention from the pursuit of objective knowledge to the movement of becoming that characterizes each individual’s life. Focusing on the theme of movement in his 1843 pseudonymous texts Either/Or, Repetition, and Fear and Trembling, Clare Carlisle presents an original and illuminating interpretation of Kierkegaard’s religious thought, including newly translated material, that emphasizes equally its philosophical and theological significance. Kierkegaard complained of a lack of movement not only in Hegelian philosophy but also in his own “dreadful still life,” and his heroes are those who leap, dance, and make journeys—but what do these movements signify, and how are they accomplished? How can we be true to ourselves, let alone to others if we are continually becoming? Carlisle explores these questions to uncover both the philosophical and the literary coherence of Kierkegaard’s notoriously enigmatic authorship.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Ontotheological Turnings?

The Decentering of the Modern Subject in Recent French Phenomenology

Explores and critiques the so-called “decentering of the subject” in French phenomenology. This incisive work examines questions of ontotheology and their relation to the so-called “theological turn” of recent French phenomenology. Joeri Schrijvers explores and critiques the decentering of the subject attempted by Jean-Luc Marion, Jean-Yves Lacoste, and Emmanuel Levinas, three philosophers who, inspired by their reading of Heidegger, attempt to overturn the active and autonomous subject. In his consideration of each thinker, Schrijvers shows that a simple reversal of the subject-object distinction has been achieved, but no true decentering of the subject. For Lacoste, the subject becomes God’s intention; for Marion, the subject becomes the object and objective of givenness; and for Levinas, the subject is without secrets, like an object, before a greater Other. Critiquing the axioms and assumptions of contemporary philosophy, Schrijvers argues that there is no overcoming ontotheology. He ultimately proposes a more phenomenological and existential approach, a presencing of the invisible, to address the concerns of ontotheology.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Passion for the Impossible, A

John D. Caputo in Focus

Presenting the first systematic appraisal of the thought of John D. Caputo, one of America’s most respected and controversial continental thinkers, this book brings together internationally renowned philosophers, theologians, and cultural critics. One highlight of the work is an interview with Jacques Derrida in which Derrida talks candidly about his reaction to Caputo’s writings and spells out the implications for religion and the question of God after deconstruction. Caputo responds to the concerns expressed by his interlocutors in the same humorous, erudite, and challenging spirit for which he is known. The result is a lively and stimulating debate, covering themes in the philosophy of religion, deconstruction, political philosophy, feminism, and hermeneutics, as well as issues surrounding the work of Aquinas, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Foucault, Derrida, and Rorty.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Paul Ricoeur and the Poetic Imperative

The Creative Tension between Love and Justice

This book addresses the thought of Paul Ricoeur (1913–2005), paying particular attention to the creative tension between love and justice as principle themes in his work. Dealing with these issues chiefly in his writings on religion, Ricoeur explored the tension between the biblical ideals of the golden rule—the religious formulation of a principle of justice—and the love command. Author W. David Hall shows how these ideals continually speak to each other in Ricoeur’s work, how they operate creatively on each other, and how each serves as a corrective to the perversions of the other. Hall maintains that although issues of love and justice became prominent comparatively late in Ricoeur’s corpus, they provide a sustained trajectory throughout his work and are an important interpretive key for understanding Ricoeur’s intellectual project as a whole.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Thinking through the Death of God

A Critical Companion to Thomas J. J. Altizer

The leading exponent of the “death of God” theology of the 1960s, Thomas J. J. Altizer created a media sensation at the time and defined a major new direction in philosophical theology. Altizer has continued to refine his thought throughout his career, and his systematic theological work has achieved its prime as shown in this collaborative critical response to his thought. This book is also the first collection of its kind to appear in nearly thirty years and, thus, the first to deal with the most sophisticated period of his work. A response from Altizer is included, along with a comprehensive bibliography of his work.

1

Results 1-9 of 9

:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

SUNY series in Theology and Continental Thought

Content Type

  • (9)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access