Canadian Literature Collection

Published by: University of Ottawa Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

Canadian Literature Collection

1 2 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 16

:
:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The 1940 Under the Volcano

A Critical Edition

Malcolm Lowry

Upon completion, The 1940 Under the Volcano was shown by Lowry’s agent, Harold (Hal) Matson, to thirteen publishers in New York and then withdrawn. By that time, Lowry was already working on the 1947 Under the Volcano for which he became internationally renowned

The 1940 Under the Volcano is a bridge between Lowry’s 1930s fiction (especially In Ballast to the White Sea) and the 1947 Under the Volcano itself. In 1994, it was transcribed for posthumous publication, with a sensitive introduction by Frederick Asals and was offered by MLR Editions Canada in a short print-run. Although Asals wrote eloquently about the position of The 1940 Under the Volcano in Lowry’s corpus, scholars have only recently begun to pay systematic attention to convergences and divergences between this earlier work and the 1947 version. 

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Collected Poems of Miriam Waddington

A Critical Edition

Ruth Panofsky

Miriam Waddington published fourteen volumes of verse during her lifetime and participated in the rise and flowering of modernist Canadian poetry. She wrote layered verse from a gendered position, first as a young social worker who recognized aspects of herself in her most vulnerable clients. She detailed intoxicating romance and mature love, the pleasures of marriage and motherhood, the experience of raising two sons to adulthood and the ineffable pain of divorce. As she moved through life, she wrote clearly and uncompromisingly about the vast sweep of Canada, her travels to new lands, the passage of time, the death of her ex-husband, the loss of close friends and, later, of growing old.
Waddington’s verse is deceptively accessible: it is personal but never private, emotional but not confessional, thoughtful but never cerebral. The subtlety of her craft is the hallmark of a modernist poet whose work opens to the world and its readers. This edition, complete with a critical introduction and comprehensive annotations, appeals to academics and lovers of poetry alike. The verse collected here will neither disappoint the attentive reader nor betray the poet.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Conversations with Trotsky

Earle Birney and the Radical 1930s

Edited and with an Introduction by Bruce Nesbitt

This collection presents all of Earle Birney’s known published and unpublished writings on Trotsky and Trotskyism for the very first time. It includes their correspondence as well as a selection of Birney’s letters and literary writings. 

Before he became one of Canada’s most influential and popular twentieth century poets, Earle Birney lived a double life. To his students and colleagues, he was an engaging university lecturer and scholar. But for seven years—from 1933 to 1940—the great Russian revolutionary Leon Trotsky was the focus of his writing and much of his life. 

During his years as a Trotskyist in Canada, the United States and England, Birney wrote extensively about Trotsky, corresponded with him, organized Trotskyist cells in two countries, and recruited on behalf of Trotskyism; he also lectured on Trotsky and interviewed him over the course of several days. One of his two novels is based on some of these activities. 

The collection traces the origins of Trotsky’s mistrust of “the British” to his experiences in Canada; shows Birney’s influence on a major shift in Trotsky’s policy of “entrism” in British politics; includes the largest body of Trotskyist criticism in Canadian literary history; and demonstrates the need for a radical re-reading of Birney’s poetry in light of his Trotskyism.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story

Laurie Kruk

Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story is the first comparative study of eight internationally and nationally acclaimed writers of short fiction: Sandra Birdsell, Timothy Findley, Jack Hodgins, Thomas King, Alistair MacLeod, Olive Senior, Carol Shields and Guy Vanderhaeghe. With the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature going to Alice Munro, the “master of the contemporary short story,” this art form is receiving the recognition that has been its due and—as this book demonstrates—Canadian writers have long excelled in it. From theme to choice of narrative perspective, from emphasis on irony, satire and parody to uncovering the multiple layers that make up contemporary Canadian English, the short story provides a powerful vehicle for a distinctively Canadian “double-voicing”. The stories discussed here are compelling reflections on our most intimate roles and relationships and Kruk offers a thoughtful juxtaposition of themes of gender, mothers and sons, family storytelling, otherness in Canada and the politics of identity to name but a few. As a multi-author study, Double-Voicing the Canadian Short Story is broad in scope and its readings are valuable to Canadian literature as a whole, making the book of interest to students of Canadian literature or the short story, and to readers of both.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Dry Water

Robert J.C. Stead edited with an introduction by Neil Querengesser and Jean Horton

Dry Water tells the story of Donald Strand, from the time of his arrival as a ten-year-old orphan at his relatives Manitoba farm in 1890 to his apogee as a successful farmer. It recounts the crises he faces during a troubled marriage and the great stock market crash of 1929. His life parallels the growth and development of Manitoba during the same period.

Stead considered Dry Water, written in 19341935, to be his crowning achievement. He was unable to find a publisher for it during his lifetime, although an abridged edition was published by Tecumseh Press in 1983. This new edition includes the complete typescript, a critical introduction, and explanatory notes that place this novel in its proper literary and historical context.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Eight Men Speak

A Play by Oscar Ryan et al.

This volume comprises a reprinting and gloss of the original text of the 1933 Communist play Eight Men Speak. The play was banned by the Toronto police after its first performance, banned by the Winnipeg police shortly thereafter and subsequently banned by the Canadian Post Office. The play can be considered as one stage – the published text – of a meta-text that culminated in 1934 at Maple Leaf Gardens when the (then illegal) Communist Party of Canada celebrated the release of its leader, Tim Buck, from prison. Eight Men Speak had been written and staged on behalf of the campaign to free Buck by the Canadian Labour Defence League, the public advocacy group of the CPC. In its theatrical techniques, incorporating avant-garde expressionist staging, mass chant, agitprop and modernist dramaturgy, Eight Men Speak exemplified the vanguardist aesthetics of the Communist left in the years before the Popular Front. It is the first instance of the collective theatrical techniques that would become widespread in subsequent decades and formative in the development of modern Canadian drama. These include a decentred narrative, collaborative authorship and a refusal of dramaturgical linearity in favour of theatricalist demonstration. As such it is one of the most significant Canadian plays of the first half of the century, and, on the evidence of the surviving photograph of the mise-en-scene, one of the earliest examples of modernist staging in Canada.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Flora Lyndsay; or, Passages in an Eventful Life

A Novel by Susanna Moodie

Susanna Moodie

Flora Lyndsay is Susanna Moodie’s prequel to Roughing it in the Bush and Life in the Clearings. It completes her trilogy on her emigration from Suffolk to Upper Canada that began in 1832. Though Moodie chose to fictionalize herself in the context of this novel, this work remains a close personalized record of her family’s experiences in planning their emigration and crossing the Atlantic.
Although surprisingly little critical attention has been paid to it, this novel offers its readers the opportunity to appreciate Moodie’s style, her sense of form and her distinctive approach to writing female autobiography. This edition, complete with a wide corpus of endnotes, an extensive list of emendations and a critical introduction, should help address this absence and give readers a closer look at the iconic phenomenon that is Susanna Moodie.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The God of Gods: A Canadian Play

A Critical Edition

Carroll Aikins

Carroll Aikins’s play The God of Gods (1919) has been out of print since its first and only edition in 1927. This critical edition not only revives the work for readers and scholars alike, it also provides historical context for Aikins’s often overlooked contributions to theatre in the 1920s and presents research on the different staging techniques in the play’s productions.

Much of the play’s historical significance lies in Aikins’s vital role in Canadian theatre, as director of the Home Theatre in British Columbia (1920–22) and artistic director of Toronto’s Hart House Theatre (1927–29). Wright reveals The God of Gods as a modernist Canadian work with overt influences from European and American modernisms. Aikins’s work has been compared to European modernists Gordon Craig, Adolphe Appia, and Jacques Copeau. Importantly, he was also intimately connected with modernist Canadian artists and the Group of Seven (who painted the scenery for Hart House Theatre).

The God of Gods contributes to current studies of theatrical modernism by exposing the primitivist aesthetics and theosophical beliefs promoted by some of Canada’s art circles at the turn of the twentieth century. Whereas Aikins is clearly progressive in his political critique of materialism and organized religion, he presents a conservative dramatization of the noble savage as hero. The critical introduction examines how The God of Gods engages with Nietzschean and theosophical philosophies in order to dramatize an Aboriginal lover-artist figure that critiques religious idols, materialism, and violence. Ultimately, The God of Gods offers a look into how English and Canadian theatre audiences responded to primitivism, theatrical modernism, and theosophical tenets during the 1920s.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Hugh Garner's Best Stories

Hugh Garner

Hugh Garner’s Best Stories presents a collection of short prose that spans a quarter-century, and develops a keen, careful view of Canada’s changing social conditions. Composed between the late 1930s and the early 1960s, these stories reflect the immense flux of the mid-century, from the Great Depression to the Spanish Civil War, World War II, the Civil Rights movement, and second-wave feminism. Garner takes on issues ranging from the anglophone-francophone conflict in Canada to racism in the American South, from the mistreatment of the mentally disabled to the erasure of First Nations’ people from Canadian culture. 

Garner’s stories showcase a deep concern for overlooked members of society. He returns to the experiences of Spanish Civil War volunteer soldiers—, having served in the International Brigades as one of only two Canadian fiction writers (with Ted Allan) who volunteered in the fight against Franco. Best Stories is not only notable for its prose—which registers economic and emotional conflict with devastating precision—but also for its unique, important contribution to the Spanish Civil War literary canon, and its invaluable survey of Canadian society from the 1930s to the 1960s. 

The 1963 collection was awarded the Governor General’s Award for English-language fiction but is now out of print. This new edition brings short fiction by Garner—best known for the novel Cabbagetown—into conversation with the wider canon of Canadian and transnational Spanish Civil War literature, midcentury modernist literature, proletarian fiction, and realism. 

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

In Ballast to the White Sea

Malcom Lowry

Lowry’s longest and most ambitious project of the mid-1930s was the autobiographical novel, In Ballast to the White Sea, about a Cambridge undergraduate who wants to be a novelist but has come to believe that both his book and, in a sense, his life have already been “written” by a Norwegian novelist.

Only decades after Lowry’s death in 1957 did it become known that his first wife, Jan Gabrial, still had a typescript of the book. In Ballast to the White Sea—which Lowry once imagined would be the Paradiso of his trilogy, with Under the Volcano as the Infernoand Swinging the Maelstrom (or Lunar Caustic) as the Purgatorio—is one of Lowry’s most intensely personal works.

The introduction places the narrative in relation to Lowry’s sense of himself in the mid-1930s and draws parallels with his post-Volcano writings such as Dark as the Grave Wherein My Friend Is Laid, La Mordida, and Through the Panama. The text of the novel, as well as Chris Ackerley’s extensive annotations provide crucial evidence about Lowry’s life and art during the 14 years between the publication of Ultramarine (1933) and Under the Volcano (1947), the only novels he completed and published during his lifetime.

1 2 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 16

:
:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

Canadian Literature Collection

Content Type

  • (16)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access