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Texas A&M University Agriculture Series

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Texas A&M University Agriculture Series

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Agroterrorism

A Guide for First Responders

By Jason B. Moats

“In many cases, the communities most ill-prepared to deal with . . . terrorism incidents,” Jason B. Moats writes in the introduction to this book, “are the rural communities that provide . . . food and crops.” Having conducted training across the country for first responders in cities, small towns, and rural communities, Moats for the first time gathers here the knowledge gleaned from research and nearly twenty years’ experience in emergency services and emergency training. Whether used in the field or in the classroom, this manual is designed to help rural communities prepare for an act of agroterrorism. It explains why the U.S. agriculture industry is a target for terrorists and how farms and farming communities across the country are vulnerable. The author lists known biological and chemical agents and their effects, explains model systems for supporting emergency response efforts, and lays out proven plans for gathering personnel and other resources in an orderly, coordinated way. In Agroterrorism: A Guide for First Responders, Moats spells out who should do what and when, providing a critically needed path through the bureaucratic maze of state, national, and interagency homeland security directives. With this book, Moats empowers those on the front lines in rural America, those charged with the responsibility of handling emergency crises in agricultural communities. Armed with the information they need, emergency response agencies, emergency managers, public health professionals, veterinary and animal health practitioners, as well as farmers and producers, will be able to answer the questions: “Where do we start?” “What do we do?” “Who is going to do it?” and “How do we pay for it?” Closing with a complete training program that includes practical exercises formatted for easy use, Agroterrorism: A Guide for First Responders contains resources vital for America’s rural communities, emergency managers, and the agriculture sector that is so central to our national interest.  

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Brush Management

Past, Present, Future

By Wayne T. Hamilton, Allan McGinty, Darrell N. Ueckert, C. Wayne Hanselka and Michelle R. Lee

The presence of brush in rangeland environments continually tops the list of priority issues among landowners, and not just in Texas. Whether they manage their land for livestock, hunting, or wildlife watching, what to do about unwanted woody plants remains a serious and pervasive question for landowners everywhere. In the pages of this book, leading range management professionals introduce and explain not only the mechanisms of managing brush but also the changes in management philosophy and technology that have taken place over time. From the futile attempts at eradication to the successes of integrated brush management, expert practitioners examine mechanical, biological, chemical, and fire-related methods from three perspectives—the past, the present or “state-of-the-art,” and the future. In a final discussion, three specialists address the timely and important subject of brush management as it relates to water yield, economics, and wildlife. Brush Management: Past, Present, Future gives readers a straightforward and comprehensive view of a topic that remains a consistent concern for livestock, wildlife, and land management—one that will serve as a useful and interesting summary of the subject for teachers, students, landowners, and management professionals.

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Entomology at the Land Grant University

Perspectives from the Texas A&M University Department Centenary

Edited by Kevin M. Heinz, Raymond E. Frisbie and Carlos E. Bográn

Insects affect the health and well-being of humans every day, everywhere, so the entomology departments that study them make a crucial contribution to many aspects of life. Indeed, agricultural success in the United States and other countries depends upon the work of entomology departments within the land grant system at universities across the nation. Entomology at the Land Grant University is a thorough look at how entomology departments have adapted to shifting demographics, changes in land use patterns, environmental issues, and advances in the life sciences. It also highlights the leadership of entomologists in their multifaceted roles as researchers, teachers, and consultants. With world-renowned contributors from both academia and industry, this volume is the culmination of a series of mini-symposia celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Department of Entomology at Texas A&M University. The centenary was a time to reflect on past accomplishments and to plan for future challenges, spotlighting the academic, scientific, economic, and social importance of entomology. The result is a broad-brushed picture of a discipline that at its best represents the highest virtues of fundamental and applied science, with topics such as: - fulfilling the land grant university mission - roles of entomology departments - the function of the extension service - the global reach of entomological research - civic education in insect management - genetic engineering - future innovations in pest management and insecticide design Not just for entomologists, this insightful look into the workings of a university department within the context of a rapidly changing scientific, social, and economic climate will appeal to anyone associated with a land grant university, extension or regulatory agency, or related industry.

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Texas Roots

Agriculture and Rural Life before the Civil War

By C. Allan Jones

In today’s Texas, with its growing urban populations and big-city lifestyles, it is worth remembering that in 1850 only 10 percent of Texans lived in towns with as many as 100 people. The rest—of many ethnic and racial groups—lived off the land, which was blessedly suited to a profitable variety of crops and livestock and also provided an abundance of wildlife free for the taking. In Texas Roots, C. Allan Jones reminds us that the economic wealth of modern Texas arose from its agricultural heritage, a rich mixture of practices and traditions including: · Caddo hunting, gathering, gardening, and farming · Irrigated agriculture at Spanish missions · Hispanic ranching · Slave-based plantations · Small-scale farmers and ranchers Through time, people adapted the agricultural technologies, laws, and customs of New Spain, Mexico, Europe, and the South to their own practical, institutional, and legal needs. The result was a particularly Texan system that would serve as the foundation for the state’s economic strength after the Civil War. Texas Roots shines a bright light on our relationship and connection with the land, bringing alive an aspect of the Texas history that contributed immeasurably to the state’s identity and prosperity.

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