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Booker T. Washington Papers

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Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 6

1901-2.

Booker T. Washington

Probably nothing in Booker T. Washington' life had as much symbolic significance for the blacks for whom he claimed to speak as the day he dined with President Theodore Roosevelt at the White House, October 16, 1901. Not even the publication of his autobiography earlier that year had indicated so clearly just how far "up from slavery" Washington had traveled. Though criticized by many, the dinner was a sign, especially to his black supporters, of Washington's arrival at the heart of power in America. Even as Washington expanded his political influence to become a counselor of presidents, the racial climate was worsening and black political rights in the South were plummeting. Volume 6 documents the events of this somber period, including Washington's secret challenge to the Alabama grandfather clause. It also includes evidence of T. Thomas Fortune's diminishing influence with Washington and the extension of the Tuskegee Machine's web of influence into the North.

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Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 7

1903-4.

Booker T. Washington

The phenomenal impact of Booker T. Washington on his time is underscored in this volume, documenting both Washington's continuing influence upon President Theodore Roosevelt and the growing dissatisfaction of some blacks with Washington's philosophy and leadership. The letters provide social historians and laymen alike with an abundant store of information on the man many consider to be the most influential figure in black history.

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Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 8

1904-6.

Booker T. Washington

Fame and influence far beyond that accorded any other black leader of the period continued to bolster Booker T. Washington's career in the two years covered by the most recent volume in this major project in black history. Volume 8 finds the Tuskegean becoming more and more a national figure, consolidating his position as presidential adviser and patronage broker, while still trying to quell black opposition to his leadership. Various letters catalog his ability to direct political "plums," to thwart the organization of potentially threatening groups, and to gain more honors for himself.

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Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 9

1906-8.

Booker T. Washington

The contrast between Booker T. Washington's private actions and public utterances continues to be revealed in this latest volume in the much-acclaimed series. Although very little changes at Tuskegee Institute during this period, Washington's leadership was faltering in the face of a virulent white racism that appeared in the North as well as the South. Still, he continued his public pursuit of and optimism for moderate solutions to racial dissension. At the same time, however, he privately redoubled his efforts to silence his black opponents, build his personal political machine, influence the black press, and maintain his autocratic rile over Tuskegee Institute.

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