University of Illinois Press

Booker T. Washington Papers

Published by: University of Illinois Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

Booker T. Washington Papers

1 2 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 14

:
:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 14

Cumulative Index

Booker T. Washington

Hailed by John Hope Franklin as "a major event by any standards," The Booker T. Washington Papers are, according to Benjamin Quarles, "of the greatest significance for the study of race relations in America." The project now draws to a close with Volume 14, the cumulative index to this collection of the selected writings and correspondence of the celebrated black educator and leader. This essential guide, which also features a complete bibliography of the writings of Booker T. Washington, will be an invaluable aid to historians. Collectors of the preceding thirteen volumes in the insightful, highly acclaimed series will not want to be without it.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 1

Volumes 1-14

Booker T. Washington

Here is the first of fifteen volumes in a project C. Vann Woodward has called "the single most important research enterprise now under way in the field of American black history." Volume 1 contains Washington's Up from Slaver, one of the most widely read American autobiographies, The Story of My Life and Work, and six other autobiographical writings. They are a good first step toward understanding Washington because they reveal the moral values he absorbed from his min-nineteenth-century experiences and teachers, and they present him to the world as he wished to be seen: the black version of the American success hero and the exemplar of the Puritan work ethic, which he believed to be the secret of his success. His writings served a success model for many blacks who wished to overcome poverty and prejudice.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 10

1909-11. Assistant editors, Geraldine McTigue and Nan E. Woodruff

Booker T. Washington

The Washington papers continue to garner critical acclaim as a major publishing enterprise in Black and American historiography. Throughout their corpus, they reveal the private world of black Americans in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and provide vivid personal perspectives on interracial relations during the "age of accommodation." Between 1909 and 191, Booker T. Washington remained the most powerful figure in black America. His dominance, however, did not go unchallenged. Both the newly inaugurated President William Howard Taft and the newly founded National Association for the Advancement of Colored People were at odds with Washington. In addition, his influence was further strained by the spread of race riots, lynchings, and laws discriminatory toward blacks. Still, Washington continued his efforts to promote better race relations and improve black educational and economic opportunity. On speaking tours in the South, he drew large enthusiastic crowds of both races who were captivated by his charismatic intelligence and style. He also remained very much involved with the daily life and administration of Tuskegee - among other things, redefining George Washington Carver's duties at the institute. This period alo saw his continued work on My Larger Education (1911), a sequel to Up from Slaver, and The Man Farthest Down (1912), a study of the working classes in Europe.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 11

1911-12.

Booker T. Washington

In 1911 and 1912 Washington continued to travel, lecture, and write in America and abroad. In England and Europe he studied working-class conditions and included his observations in The Man Farthest Down (1912). During this same time period, however, he and his Tuskegee Machine suffered systematic shocks from which they only partially recovered. Washington's political role as presidential adviser declined steadily during Taft's administration. The decline itself was overshadowed, if not hastened, by Washington's involvement in a highly sensationalized incident - his brutal beating at the hands of Henry Albert Ulrich in early 1911. While this act stimulated a wave of sympathy from Washington's supporters, the circumstances surrounding the incident provided added fuel for his detractors.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 12

1912-14

Booker T. Washington

From September 1912 through March 1914, Washington continued his heavy schedule of speaking, fund-raising, race leadership, and close supervision of Tuskegee Institute. Although the election of Woodrow Wilson to the presidency led to the dismantling of the Tuskegee Machine's political arm, Washington remained a prominent figure in the political arena. During this period, however, freed from the constraints he had felt as presidential adviser, he became more openly critical of racial injustice. His most sweeping and direct attack appeared in "Is the Negro Having a Fair Chance?" published in The Century a few days after Wilson's election. In this article he criticized the continuing existence of job discrimination in the North, and of Jim Crow transportation and poor education opportunities in the South. Washington continued to advocate economic and educational means for black advancement, persuading the Phelps-Stokes Fund to finance a study of black secondary and higher education and creating in 1912 the Tuskegee Five Year Fund. Despite the changing times and gradual decline in his personal vigor, Washington's actions hardly suggested the little time he had left to live.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 13

1914-15.

Booker T. Washington

When Booker T. Washington died in November 1915, he was mourned by blacks and whites alike as a national hero. Such prominent figures as W.E.B. Du Bois, Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie and Julius Rosenwald publicity paid him high tribute. Distinguished journals and newspapers published editorials praising his work and lamenting his passing. The present volume includes much of this response to Washington's death and, in covering the final two years of his life, brings to a close one of the most critically acclaimed documentary projects of the past two decades.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 2

1860-89.

Booker T. Washington

In his lifetime Washington was the most influential African American in the United States. In this volume the editors hope to convey the shaping forces of his early life. They have gathered and annotated more than 400 documents, including letters, speeches, articles, and other writings from shortly after Washington's birth in 1856 to the death of his second wife in 1889. Much of the material relates to the founding of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute. Washington's life became so interwoven with his school that to illustrate his career is also to tell the story of the institution.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 3

1889-95.

Booker T. Washington

Washington's gradual rise to prominence as an educator, race leader, and shrewd political broker is revealed in this volume, which covers his career from May 1889 to September 1895, when he delivered the famous speech often called the Atlanta Compromise address. Much of the volume relates to Washington's role as principal of Tuskegee Institute, where he built a powerful base of operations for his growing influence with white philanthropists in the North, southern white leaders, and the black community.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 4

1895-98.

Booker T. Washington

Covering Washington's career from September 1895 - after the Atlanta Compromise address thrust him into prominence as the black spokesman whites were willing to listen to - to December 198, when President William McKinley visited Tuskegee, the papers in this volume demonstrate Washington's growing fame and public acceptance. Throughout this period, although he continued his close paternal watch over Tuskegee, he became increasingly involved with the concerns of the national black community, speaking to overflow audiences of both races all over the country. This was a time of increasing racial segregation as evidenced by the landmark Plessy v. Fergusson decision, which established the "separate but equal" doctrine not only in transportation but in public accommodations and education. Washington reacted strongly to this, and several years later, in response to the rising tide of discrimination, he delivered his controversial Peace Jubilee speech, calling upon the South to bury racial and sectional prejudice in the trenches of San Juan Hill, where black and white, northerner and southerner, had united in a fight for freedom.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Booker T. Washington Papers Volume 5

1899-1900.

Booker T. Washington

This volume turns from emphasizing Washington's institution-building (Tuskegee Institute) to examine those writings which reveal more about the black leader's growing role as a national public figure. Volume 5 covers a period during which Washington's fortunes continued to rise even as those of the black masses, for whom he claimed to speak, declined. Though forced to adhere narrowly to the racial philosophy he had espoused in the Atlanta Compromise address of 1895, Washington nonetheless was able to involve himself covertly in matters of civil rights and politics. He used the National Negro Business League as a front for political activity. He successfully lobbied against disenfranchisement of black voters in Georgia during November, 1899. During these years Washington began behind-the-scenes civil rights activities that foreshadowed a much more elaborate "secret life" after the turn of the century. He worked with lawyers of the Afro-American Council to test in the courts the grandfather clause of the Louisiana constitution of 1898, raising money to pay the legal costs and swearing the other participants to secrecy. T. Thomas Fortune, the leading black journalist of the day, was Washington's close personal advisor as he sought to spread his sphere of influence from his southern base to northern cities. Also included are writings on the first convention of the National Negro Business League, Washington's address before the Southern Industrial Convention in Huntsville, Ala., and the full text of Washington's first book, The Future of the American Negro, published in December, 1899. A fascinating view of Booker T. Washington and the milieu in which he operated, Volume 5 provides further reason to call the project, as C. Vann Woodward has done, "the single most important research enterprise now under way in the field of American black history."

1 2 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 14

:
:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

Booker T. Washington Papers

Content Type

  • (14)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access