The University of Alabama Press

Library Alabama Classics

John Smith, Will Wordsworth

Published by: The University of Alabama Press

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Library Alabama Classics

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The Story of Coal and Iron in Alabama

Ethel Armes

“The principal authority for the general treatment of the history of coal, and of iron and steel, in
Alabama is the work of Miss Ethel Armes. The Story of Coal and Iron in Alabama is a comprehensive
and scholarly work portraying in attractive style the growth of the mineral industries in its
relation to the development of the state and of the South, in preparation of which the author spent
more than five years.”
—Thomas McAdory Owen, History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography

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The Tallons

In The Tallons, the second book in his “Pearl County” series, William March continues to hone his distinctive style but for the first time creates a work that follows a continuous, linear narrative. Here, March’s masterful development of the theme of jealousy highlights his growing maturity and ambition as a writer.

Set in a rural Alabama backwater, The Tallons tells the story of two farm boys, Andrew and Jim Tallon. Their placid and predictable life is upended by a girl from Georgia, Myrtle Bickerstaff. The conflict which engulfs these three is built up from a series of carefully chosen and extraordinarily telling incidents to a dramatic climax which will be remembered long after the book is set aside.
March framed the novel as “a study in paranoia” and to the end of his life considered it one of his strongest works.

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They Live on The Land

Life in an Open Country Southern Community

"First published in 1940 as part of the information-gathering effort of the TVA, the work examines Gorgas, Alabama, a predominantly white farming settlement. Hailed as the most intensive case study ever made in the South, the book provides a detailed portrait of southern rural life on the verge of extinction."
—Florida Historical Quarterly

"One of the finest examples of the genre of the community survey. . . The book is remarkably free of special pleading. And every chapter is paced with fascinating data and insights. The University of Alabama Prss is to be congratulated for reissuing this splendid community study; the volume fits the description of a classic. And Clarence L. Mohr's introduction alone is worth the price of the volume."
—Journal of Southwest Georgia History

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The Third Door

The Autobiography of an American Negro Woman

Ellen Tarry was born in 1906 in Birmingham, Alabama. While attending a Catholic school in Virginia during her teens, she joined the Church. She returned to Alabama to attend college at Alabama State Normal School for Colored in Montgomery and then taught in the Birmingham Public Schools from 1924 to 1926.

In pursuit of her dream of becoming a writer, Tarry moved to New York, where she worked for black newspapers and became acquainted with some of the prominent black artists and writers of the day, particularly Claude McKay and James Weldon Johnson. Her devotion to the church found expression in social work activities, first in Harlem, then in Chicago, and, during World War II, in Anniston, Alabama, where she directed a USO for black soldiers stationed at Fort McClellan. Tarry wrote several books for young readers, including biographies of James Weldon Johnson and Pierre Toussaint. She continued her social work career after the war and now lives in New York.
Devoid of pronounced racial markings, Tarry’s interactions with white Americans were not characterized by fear or distrust. But when her own brown daughter was subjected to racial discrimination she wrote The Third Door in 1955 to tell America about the plight of her people. With prose that is both moving and powerful, Tarry relates her life against the background of a changing American society. She still awaits the third door, designated neither “white” nor “colored,” through which all American will someday walk.

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Trial Balance

The Collected Short Stories of William March

  The Collected Short Stories of William March

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Twenty-Five Years in the Black Belt

"Twenty-Five Years in the Black Belt is the memoir of the founder and principal of Snow Hill Institute, a 'little Tuskegee,' located in rural Wilcox County, Alabama. . . . Edwards reveals the conditions of blacks and race relations in Alabama between 1890 and 1917 and tells of his determination to uplift his race through education in the years following Reconstruction." --Florida Historical Quarterly "This addition to the Library of Alabama Classics has much to recommend it to historians, scholars, and anyone interested in the early history of the African-Americans' struggle to become educated, to be able to take an equal place in the land they now had to call home. Though the story is told by one man and revolves around his stubborn dedication to building a school where young people could receive an education, it also reveals much about the social and cultural life of those times." --American Library Book Review

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The Two Worlds of William March

Roy S. Simmonds

“Described by José Garcia Villa as America’s ‘greatest short story writer,’ by Alistair Cooke as the ‘the unrecognized genius of our time,’ and by his biographer as ‘one of the most remarkable, talented, and shamefully neglected writers that America has pro- duced,’ William March (1893–1954) is remembered, if at all, for The Bad Seed, which March ironically regarded as his worst work. The emphasis in The Two Worlds of William March is on the literary career, and we get a fairly full picture of a hardworking, oversensitive, compassionate bachelor, who suffered a tragic breakdown late in life . . . [and] whose best long works, Company K and The Looking-Glass, as well as March himself are almost forgotten. . . . Simmonds’s comprehensive, scholarly, and sympathetic study may redress this unwarranted neglect.” —CHOICE

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Unfinished Cathedral

Unfinished Cathedral is the third volume of T.S. Stribling’s Southern trilogy and was originally published in 1934. The trilogy, Stribling’s greatest literary achievement, is set in and around Florence, Alabama, and spans six decades of social, economic, and political change from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the 1920s. In each of the novels Stribling brings together the various social classes of the period, revealing their interdependency. The Forge is the story of the South during the period of the Civil War and Reconstruction, while The Store chronicles the changing social and economic landscape of the post-Reconstruction period and the rise to power of the mercantile class in the reconstructed South. In Unfinished Cathedral, Stribling continues the story of the dramatic transformation in the social structure of the South. The 1920s saw the control of society shift from the wealthy landowners and merchants to the rising middle class. This period also saw significant changes in the status of Southern women and blacks, and economically, a surge of prosperity was evident that was brought on by the land boom and the resulting influx of Northern dollars.

The University of Alabama Press reissued the first two novels in T.S. Stribling’s trilogy, The Forge and The Store, in 1985.

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