The University of Alabama Press

Library Alabama Classics

John Smith, Will Wordsworth

Published by: The University of Alabama Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

Library Alabama Classics

1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 38

:
:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

99 Fables

“March has picked up where Aesop and Don Marquis left off, prick- ing vanities and exposing antics of chronic phonies. . . . Here are damning truths about the Noblest Animal, here is vitriol without venom. richard Brough catches the full flavor in his illustrations.” —New York Times Book Review

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs

Late of the Tallapoosa Volunteers; Together with Taking the Census and Other Alabama Sketches

Originally published in 1845, Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs is a series of sketches written in part to parody some the campaign literature of the era. The character, Simon Suggs, with his motto, “it is good to be shifty in a new country,” fully incarnates a backwoods version of the national archetypes now know as the confidence man, the grafter, the professional flim-flam artist supremely skilled in the arts by which a man gets along in the world. This classic volume of good humor is set in the rough-and-tumble world of frontier life and politics.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Alabama Blast Furnaces

Written by Joseph H. Woodward and introduction by James R. Bennett

This work is the first and remains the only source of information on all blast furnaces built and operated in Alabama, from the first known charcoal furnace of 1815 (Cedar Creek Furnace in Franklin County) to the coke-fired giants built before the onset of the Great Depression. Woodward surveys the iron industry from the early, small local market furnaces through the rise of the iron industry in support of the Confederate war effort, to the giant internationally important industry that developed in the 1890s. The bulk of the book consists of individual illustrated histories of all blast furnaces ever constructed and operated in the state? furnaces that went into production and four that were built but never went into blast. Written to provide a record of every blast furnace built in Alabama from 1815 to 1940, this book was widely acclaimed and today remains one of the most quoted references on the iron and steel industry.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Alias Simon Suggs

The Life and Times of Johnson Jones Hooper

Written by William Stanley Hoole

 

“When these words were written everybody had read or heard of Simon Suggs, the shifty man whose antics had been recorded in many a gusty tale of Alabama frontier life which had drawn laughter and applause from newspaper readers throughout the United States. And everybody, at least in Alabama in the 1850s, knew something about his creator, Johnson Jones Hooper. . . . The immortal Suggs, his alter ego, has kept his name alive and renewed its luster, in a biography that deserves almost unqualified praise. Dr. Hoole’s Alias Simon Suggs is a noteworthy achievement. . . . A milestone in contemporary Alabama scholarship, it will become a standard reference work on the literary and political scene [and] as a distinguished piece of biographical writing, skillfully organized and deftly presented.”—Alabama Review

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Ante-Bellum Alabama

Town and Country

Ante-Bellum Alabama:  Town and Country was written to give the reader insight into importaant facers of Alabama’s ante-bellum history.  Presented in the form of case studies from the pre—Civil War period, the book deals with a city, a town, a planter’s family, rural social life, attitudes concerning race, and Alabama’s early agricultural and industrial development.

Ante-bellum Alabama’s primary interest was agriculture; the chief crop was King Cotton; and most of the people were agriculturalists.  Towns and cities came into existence to supply the agricultural needs of the state and to process and distribute farm commodities.  Similarly, Alabama’s industrial development began with the manufacture of implements for farm use, in response to the state’s agricultural needs.  Rural-agriculture influences dominated the American scene; and in this respect Alabama was typical of her region as well as of most of the United States.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Bourbon Democracy in Alabama, 1874–1890

Hailed as the definitive study of the subject when it appeared in 1951, Bourbon Democracy in Alabama analyzes and describes the state government of Alabama during the Bourbon Period as it operated under the Democratic and Conservative party. For this edition, the author has prepared a new foreword in which he surveys recent scholarship. The term Bourbon originated during the Reconstruction Era and was used by the Radicals to label their Democratic opponents as anti-progressive and ultraconservative. The term has been adopted generally to describe the period following the overthrow of Radical Reconstruction.

 

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Come in at the Door

His debut novel, Company K, introduced William March to the reading public as a gifted writer of modern fiction. Of that World War I classic Graham Greene wrote: “ It is the only war book I have read which has found a new form to fit the novelty of the protest. The prose is bare, lucid, without literary echoes.” After Company K, March brought his same unerring style to a cycle of novels and short stories— his “ Pearl County” series— inspired in part by his childhood in the vicinity of Mobile, Alabama. Come In at the Door is the first novel in that series.
 
Before dawn one morning, little Chester is taken by his nurse, his father’ s mistress, to the courthouse in Athlestan, a county seat in the Deep South. A sensitive and impressionable boy, Chester watches in horror while one of his father’ s mixed-race servants is hanged as punishment for killing a hunchback he believed had “ laid a conjure” on him.
 
The apathy of the townspeople toward the servant’ s suffering and execution play a vital part in Chester’ s fascinating development. Throughout his conventional childhood and rambunctious manhood in a port town, the gruesome memory of the Athlestan gallows hovers just below the surface of his mind. He recalls the gruesome details only at his father’ s death, when the book sweeps forward to its shattering denouement. 

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Company K

With an Introduction by Philip D. Beidler
 

This book was originally published in 1933. It is the first novel by William March, pen name for William Edward Campbell. Stemming directly from the author's experiences with the U.S. Marines in France during World War I, the book consists of 113 sketches, or chapters, tracing the fictional Company K's war exploits and providing an emotional history of the men of the company that extends beyond the boundaries of the war itself.

William Edward Campbell served courageously in France as evidenced by his chestful of medals and certificates, including the Croix de Guerre, the Distinguished Service Cross, and the Navy Cross. However, without the medals and citations we would know of his bravery. For it is clear in the pages of Company K that this book was written by a man who had been to war, who had clearly seen his share of the worst of it, who had somehow survived, and who had committed himself afterward to the new bravery of sense-making embodied in the creation of major literary art. It is of that bravery that we still have the record of magnificent achievement, the brave terrible gift of Company K.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Creek War of 1813 and 1814

H. S. Halbert and T. H. Ball, edited by Frank L. Owsley

The first edition of Halbert and Ball's Creek War was published in 1895, and a new edition containing an introductory essay, supplementary notes, a bibliography, and an index by Frank L. Owsley Jr., was published in 1969. This standard account of one of the most controversial wars in which Americans have fought is again available, with introductory materials and a bibliography revised to reflect the advances in scholarship since the 1969 edition. This facsimile reproduction of the 1895 original provides a full and sympathetic account of the Indians' point of view, from the earliest visit of the great Shawnee chief Tecumseh to the southern tribes in 1811, through the buildup of apprehension and hostilities leading to the fateful battles at Burnt Corn, Fort Mims, and Holy Ground.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Fleur de Lys and Calumet

Being the Penicaut Narrative of French Adventure in Louisiana

Edited by Richebourg McWilliams

Andre Penicaut, a carpenter, sailed with Iberville to the French province of Louisiana in 1699 and did not return to France until 1721. The book he began in the province and finished upon his return to France is an eyewitness account of the first years of the French colony, which stretched along the Gulf Coast from Florida to Texas and in the Mississippi Valley from the Balize to the Illinois country. As a ship carpenter, Penicaut was chosen as a member of several important expeditions: he accompanied Le Sueur up the Mississippi River in 1700 to present-day Minnesota, and he went with Juchereau de St. Denis on the first journey from Mobile to the Red River and overland to the Rio Grande, to open trade with the Spaniards in Mexico. Penicaut helped to build the first post in Louisiana, at Old Biloxi, and the second post on the Mobile River.

Penicaut was at his best when describing the lives and social customs of the Indians of the region. He saw them in realistic terms, showing no prejudice toward their native habits. Neither were his French colleagues cast in heroic or villainous molds—though their accomplishments must strike modern readers as truly epic.

When first published, Fleur de Lys and Calumet was a major stimulus to scholarship in the field. This new edition will be welcomed by a new generation of scholars and readers interested in the colonial history of the Deep South and the Mississippi Valley.

1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 38

:
:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

Library Alabama Classics

Content Type

  • (38)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access