Baylor University Press

Baylor-Mohr Siebeck Studies in Early Christianity

Wayne Coppins and Simon Gathercole, Series Editors

Published by: Baylor University Press

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Baylor-Mohr Siebeck Studies in Early Christianity

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Christian Theology and Its Institutions in the Early Roman Empire

Prolegomena to a History of Early Christian Theology

Christoph Markschies

Investigates the history of early Christian theology and the relationship between Christian theology and Christian institutions.

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From Jesus to the New Testament

Early Christian Theology and the Origin of the New Testament Canon

Jens Schröter

As the inaugural volume in the Baylor-Mohr Siebeck Studies in Early Christianity series, Jens Schröter’s celebrated From Jesus to the New Testament is now available for the first time in English. Schröter provides a rich narrative to Christian history by looking back upon the theological forces that created the New Testament canon. Through his textual, historical, and hermeneutical examination of early Christianity, Schröter reveals how various writings that form the New Testament’s building blocks are all held together. Jesus not only bound the New Testament, but launched a theological project that resulted in the canon. Schröter’s study will undoubtedly spark new discussion about the formation of the canon.

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Israel, Church, and the Gentiles in the Gospel of Matthew

Matthias Konradt

Israel, Church, and the Gentiles in the Gospel of Matthew addresses one of the central theological problems of Matthew’s Gospel: what are the relationships between Israel and the Church and between the mission to Israel and the mission to the Gentiles? To answer these questions, Matthias Konradt traces the surprising transition from the Israel-centered words and deeds of Jesus (and his disciples) before Easter to the universal mission of Jesus’ earliest followers after his resurrection. Through careful historical and narrative analysis, Konradt rejects the interpretation of the Gospel of Matthew that the Church replaced Israel in God’s purposes—that is, the interpretation that because Israel rejected Jesus as Israel’s Messiah, the Church replaced Israel in the role of God’s chosen people. Konradt instead discovers in Matthew that the Israel- and universally-centered dimensions of God’s saving purposes are far more positively connected. Matthew develops a narrative that features Jesus’ identity as both the messianic Son of David and the universal Son of God. What developed into a mainly Gentile Church should never think of itself as the "new" or "true” Israel; but, according to Matthew’s Gospel, the Church represents an extension of the promises first made to Israel and now inclusive of the Gentiles.

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