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Christ and Analogy

The Christocentric Metaphysics of Hans Urs von Balthasar

By Junius Johnson

As one of the pillars of the nouvelle theologie movement, a main influence upon the Second Vatican Council, and one of the few figures to complete a full-scale multi-volume systematics, Hans Urs von Balthasar is undoubtedly one of the towering figures of twentieth-century theology. Until now, the structural undergirding of von Balthasar’s main contribution, a weighty 15-volume, three-part “triptych” dogmatics, has not been assessed. In this volume, the author presents an analysis of von Balthasar’s work in dogmatics and provides the structural linchpin for understanding the whole of this massive (and massively important) systematic theology by reconstructing the metaphysics of von Balthasar. Taking the person of Jesus Christ as the metaphysical starting point, the project highlights the fundamental connections to key doctrinal, historical, and philosophical issues. This is a critical volume for professors, scholars, and students in systematic theology, philosophical theology, and the study of twentieth-century Catholic and Protestant theology and history.

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Christ Crucified in a Suffering World

The Unity of Atonement and Libreation

By Nathan D. Hieb

What is the connection between Christian doctrine and concrete social action? This question marks the often unarticulated divide between systematic theology and liberation theology, each often emphasizing one primarily or formally over the other. Examining the work of Karl Barth, T. F. Torrance, and Jon Sobrino, here Nathan Hieb contests this bifurcation, specifically around the nodal points of the crucifixion, or the doctrine of atonement, and the context of suffering. This book is an innovative study that bridges the boundaries of method, doctrine, and praxis, creating a strong theological and action-oriented relationship between systematic and liberation theology.

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Christ Divided

Antiblackness as Corporate Vice

By Katie Walker Grimes

Bringing the wisdom of generations of black Catholics into conversation with contemporary scholarly accounts of racism, Christ Divided diagnoses "antiblackness supremacy" as a corporate vice that inhabits the body of Christ. To truly understand racial inequality, theologians must acknowledge the existence of "antiblackness supremacy" and recognize its uniquely foundational role in prevailing processes of racialization and racial hierarchy.

In addition to introducing a new framework of racial analysis, this book proposes a new approach to virtue ethics. Because the church‘s participation in and performance of white supremacy occurs as a result of corporate habituation, the church most needs new habits, not new teachings. The theory of corporate virtue outlined here provides a framework through which to evaluate these habits and propose new ones-to be made to "do the right thing."

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Christ Our Hope

An Introduction to Eschatology

Christ Our Hope is a masterful reflection on Christian eschatology, in a textbook of twelve accessible chapters.

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Christ's First Theologian

The Shape of Paul’s Thought

Leander E. Keck

For half a century Leander Keck thought, taught, and wrote about the New Testament. He first served as a Professor of New Testament at Vanderbilt Divinity School and Emory University’s Candler School of Theology before becoming Dean and Professor of Biblical Theology at Yale Divinity School. Keck’s lifelong work on Jesus and Paul was a catalyst for the emerging discussions of New Testament Christology and Pauline theology in the Society of Biblical Literature and the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas. Keck wrote a staggering number of now industry-standard articles on the New Testament. Here, they are all collected for the first time. In Why Christ Matters and Christ's First Theologian, readers will discover how Keck gave new answers to old questions even as he carefully reframed old answers into new questions. Keck’s work is a treasure trove of historical, exegetical, and theological interpretation.

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Christ's Gift, Our Response

Martin Luther and Louis-Marie Chauvet on the Connection between Sacraments and Ethics

Benjamin Durheim

Sacramental theology has often been a challenging area of conversation between Catholics and Protestants. In Christ’s Gift, Our Response, Benjamin Durheim envisions a collaborative way forward, forging a conversation between two contemporary approaches to the connection between sacraments and ethics. Drawing primarily from Louis-Marie Chauvet and the Finnish school of Luther interpretation, Durheim constructs a mutually enriching theological dialogue. Beyond comparison and contrast, this is an attempt to draw these theologies together as sources for each other, rather than as competitors.

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Christ the Light

The Theology of Light and Illumination in Thomas Aquinas

by David L. Whidden III

Light is one of the most ancient and significant metaphors adopted by Christianity by which to understand the significance of Jesus Christ. The Easter liturgy, for instance, is marked by beautiful and powerful rituals proclaiming Christ as the light of the world in his death and resurrection. That understanding developed over subsequent centuries into a larger doctrine of illumination—how Christians come to understand and know God through Christ the Light. In this work, David Whidden takes up that theme in contesting a standard paradigm of interpretation that asserts that Aquinas eliminated the doctrine of illumination in his theology.

In Christ the Light, Whidden argues that illumination is a critical systematic motif in Aquinas’s theology, one that involves the nature of truth, knowledge, and God; at the root, Aquinas’s theology of light, or illumination, is Christological, grounding human knowledge of God and eschatological beatitude. This volume establishes the theological network formed by the crucial motif of light/illumination in Aquinas, from how theology operates to the systematic, sacramental, and moral coordinates in Aquinas’ theology. Christ the Light thus provides a much needed and illuminating retrieval of the one of the most important and creative theologians in the western Christian tradition.

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Christ the Miracle Worker in Early Christian Art

By Lee M. Jefferson

Artistic representations were of significant value to early Christian communities. In Christ the Miracle Worker in Early Christian Art, Lee Jefferson argues that images provided visual representations of vital religious and theological truths crucial to the faithful and projected concepts beyond the limitations of the written and spoken word. Images of Christ performing miracles or healings functioned as advertisements for Christianity and illustrated the nature of Christ. Using these images of Christ, Jefferson examines the power of art, its role in fostering devotion, and the deep connection between art and its elucidation of pivotal theological claims.

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Christian Doctrine and the Grammar of Difference

A Contribution to Feminist Systematic Theology

by Janice McRandal

Christian Doctrine and the Grammar of Difference argues that the most potent and resourceful theological response to the challenging questions of gender and difference is to be found in a retrieval of a doctrinal framework for feminist theology. In particular, it is suggested that a doctrinal narrative of creation, fall, and redemption—underpinned by the doctrinal grammar of the Trinity—provides resources to resolve the theological impasse of difference in contemporary feminist theology. The divine economy reveals a God who enters into history and destabilizes fixed binaries and oppressive categories. The biblical narrative discloses a subtle yet potent fluidity to the Triune relationships. As created subjects—precisely in our difference—we are sustained, affirmed, and drawn back into the Triune life. The subtleties of divine transgression are already recognized in the patterns of the liturgy, in prayer, and in practices of contemplation. Here, bodies not only encounter the transgressive love of God but are enabled to inhabit their differentiated humanity with distinctiveness and grace. The grammar of Christian faith cannot ultimately be uncovered except in prayer, opened beyond itself to a source of life and giving.

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