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Jesus the Mediator Cover

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Jesus the Mediator

In Jesus the Mediator, William L. Brownsberger offers an account of the human psychology assumed by the Second Person of the Trinity in light of its salvific significance

John Cuthbert Ford, SJ Cover

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John Cuthbert Ford, SJ

Moral Theologian at the End of the Manualist Era

John Cuthbert Ford, SJ (1902-1989) was one of the leading American Catholic moralists of the 20th century. This is the first full-length analysis of his work and influence, one that not only reveals a traditionally Catholic method of moral analysis but al

John Duns Scotus - Four Questions On Mary Cover

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John Duns Scotus - Four Questions On Mary

Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Allan Wolter

This small book offers, in a Latin/English editon, a contribution of John Duns Scotus to the theological discussion on Mary the Mother of God. His views had a profound influence on Marian doctrine and devotion over the centuries, culminating in Pius IX’s dogmatic proclamation of Mary’s Immaculate Conception. The questions are dealt with in Scotus’s Ordinatio and are set up in the stylized tripartite format used by medieval professional theologians in their commentaries on the Sentences of Peter Lombard.

Journey toward God in Augustine's Confessions, The Cover

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Journey toward God in Augustine's Confessions, The

Books I-VI

This detailed discussion of Augustine’s journey toward God, as it is described in the first six books of the Confessions, begins with infancy, moves through childhood and adolescence, and culminates in youthful maturity. In the first stage, Augustine deals with the problems of original innocence and sin; in the second, he addresses a pear-stealing episode that recapitulates the theft of the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden and confronts the problem of sexuality with which he wrestles until his conversion; and in the third, he turns toward philosophy, only to be captivated successively by dualism, skepticism, and Catholicism. Augustine’s journey exhibits temporal, spatial, and eternal dimensions and combines his head and his heart in equal proportions. Vaught shows that the Confessions should be interpreted as an attempt to address the person as a whole rather than through our intellectual or volitional dimensions exclusively. The passion with which Augustine describes the end of his journey is reflected best in a sentence found in the opening chapter of the text—“You have made us for yourself, and our heart is restless until it rests in you.” Interpreting this statement, Carl G. Vaught presents a more emphatically Christian Augustine than is usually found in contemporary scholarship. Refusing to view Augustine in an exclusively Neoplatonic framework, Vaught holds that Augustine baptizes Plotinus just as successfully as Aquinas baptizes Aristotle. It cannot be denied that Ancient philosophy influences Augustine decisively. Nevertheless, he holds the experiential and the theoretical dimensions of his journey toward God together as a distinctive expression of the Christian tradition.

Juan de Sogovia and the Fight for Peace Cover

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Juan de Sogovia and the Fight for Peace

Christians and Muslims in the Fifteenth Century

Anne Marie Wolf

Juan de Segovia (d. 1458), theologian, translator of the Qur'an, and lifelong advocate for the forging of peaceful relations between Christians and Muslims, was one of Europe's leading intellectuals. Today, however, few scholars are familiar with this important fifteenth-century figure. In this well-documented study, Anne Marie Wolf presents a clear, chronological narrative that follows the thought and career of Segovia, who taught at the University of Salamanca, represented the university at the Council of Basel (1431–1449), and spent his final years arguing vigorously that Europe should eschew war with the ascendant Ottoman Turks and instead strive to convert them peacefully to Christianity. What could make a prominent thinker, especially one who moved in circles of power, depart so markedly from the dominant views of his day and advance arguments that he knew would subject him to criticism and even ridicule? Although some historians have suggested that the multifaith heritage of his native Spain accounts for his unconventional belief that peaceful dialogue with Muslims was possible, Wolf argues that other aspects of his life and thought were equally important, especially his approach to the Bible and his experience at the Council of Basel, where his defense of conciliarism in the face of opposition contributed to his ability to defend an unpopular position and where his insistence on conversion through peaceful means was bolstered by discussions about the proper way to deal with the Hussites. Ultimately Wolf demonstrates that Segovia's thought on Islam and the proper Christian stance toward the Muslim world was consistent with his approach to other endeavors and with cultural and intellectual movements at play throughout his career.

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The Jurist: Studies in Church Law and Ministry

Vol. 72 (2012) through current issue

The only journal published in the United States devoted to the study and promotion of canon law. The Jurist explores canon law issues relating to the life of the church today, its historical sources, and various applications in diverse church ministries. The journal is peer-reviewed.

Kierkegaard and the Catholic Tradition Cover

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Kierkegaard and the Catholic Tradition

Conflict and Dialogue

Jack Mulder, Jr.

Although Søren Kierkegaard, considered one of the most passionate Christian writers of the modern age, was a Lutheran, he was deeply dissatisfied with the Lutheran establishment of his day. Some scholars have said that he pushed his faith toward Catholicism. Placing Kierkegaard in sustained dialogue with the Catholic tradition, Jack Mulder, Jr., does not simply review Catholic reactions to or interpretations of Kierkegaard, but rather provides an extended look into convergences and differences on issues such as natural theology, natural moral law, Christian love, apostolic authority, the doctrine of hell, contrition for sins, the doctrine of purgatory, and the communion of saints. Through his analysis of Kierkegaard's philosophy of religion, Mulder presents deeper possibilities for engagements between Protestantism and Catholicism.

Learning Christ Cover

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Learning Christ

Gregory Vall

The Legacy of Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J.:His Words and His Witness Cover

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The Legacy of Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J.:His Words and His Witness

His Words and His Witness

Ann-Marie Kirmse

In his nearly 50-year career teaching philosophy and theology at Fordham and other distinguished universities, Cardinal Avery Dulles wrote and traveled extensively, writing 25 books and more than 800 articles, book reviews, forewords, introductions, and letters to the editor, translated into at least 14 languages and distributed worldwide. This work serves as a companion to the previous volume of McGinley Lectures, published as Church and Society(Fordham, 2008), and also provides an independent research guide for scholars, theologians, and anyone interested in American Catholicism in the decades immediately before and following the Second Vatican Council.From his poems and reflections composed in prep school where he first crossed paths with John Fitzgerald Kennedy (with whom he would graduate from Harvard in 1940) to a private meeting in his last days arranged at Pope Benedict XVI's personal request, the book explores a theological topography that includes truly monumentalfigures and events of the modern era. As the product of perhaps the most influential American Catholic theologian in history, Dulles's writings continue to inspire and shape the way theology has been studied and practiced in academic institutions throughout the United States and the world.Having worked closely with Cardinal Dulles, the editors have compiled an exhaustive bibliography of his works and have included a series of essays that shed light on the twilight of his life, one that intersects with ecclesiastical, theological, philosophical, and political leaders of every stripe and worldview. Contributions include Dulles's farewell lecture as McGinley Professor of Religion and Society with a stirring response by Robert Imbelli; a reflection on the Cardinal's last days by longtime research assistant Anne-Marie Kirmse, O.P.; and the moving homily given at his funeral by Edward Cardinal Egan.The book also chronicles Cardinal Dulles's relationship with Fordham University, where he began his academic career as a Jesuit regent, teaching philosophy (1951 53), and where, for the last twenty years of his life, he held an endowed chair named in honor of a former president of Fordham, Laurence J. McGinley, S.J. This text will serve as a liminal passageway into the splendid mansion of Dulles's thought for theologians, scholars, believers, and all thinking men and women of goodwill.

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