Browse Results For:

Religion > Christianity > Catholic Studies

previous PREV 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 NEXT next

Results 71-80 of 422

:
:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Christian Marriage

The New Challenge, Second Edition

David Thomas

2008 Catholic Press Association Award Winner!Couples who marry today enter into a relationship that is in many ways more challenging than it was a generation or two ago. The social institution of marriage has experienced almost cataclysmic change. The very foundations of marriage are often questioned. Yet Christian marriage, David Thomas insists, retains a power to transform and sanctify lives. Thomas presents in this second edition of Christian Marriage the same view as he did in his first book: a positive view of Christian marriage grounded in sacramental living. Yet this edition is entirely new as Thomas reflects on how current theological, cultural, and economic perspectives influence and inform Christian marriage. Thus A Journey Together (the subtitle of the earlier edition) becomes The New Challenge. And readers enter with Thomas into a discussion of contemporary concerns such as intimacy and sexuality, gender equality and relational spirituality, and parenting with hope in a world of unknowns.Facing these challenges of marriage, Christian couples will discover ways to meet the one great challenge: to love each other as Christ Jesus has and continues to love us.David Thomas, PhD, is the current co-director of The Bethany Family Institute. For over thirty years he was a Professor of Systematic Theology, Religion, and Family Life at St. Louis University, St. Meinrad School of Theology in Indiana, and Regis University in Denver. Thomas served as a theological consultant to the United States Catholic Bishops ' Committee on Marriage and Family Life. He and Karen, his wife of forty years, are the parents of seven children and seventy-five foster children. He now lives in Whitefish, Montana.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Christianity and Culture in the Middle Ages

Essays to Honor John Van Engen

David C. Mengel

This volume celebrates the remarkable scholarly career of medieval historian John Van Engen with eighteen exceptional essays contributed by Van Engen’s colleagues and former doctoral students, a group that includes some of the best established scholars of the Middle Ages as well as leading younger ones. Together, their work reflects the wide-ranging but coherent body of John Van Engen’s own scholarship. In a section on Christianization, Ruth Mazo Karras explores medieval marriage, Lisa Wolverton offers a new model of the Christianization of Bohemia, R. I. Moore examines the historiography of the Cathars, and Christine Caldwell Ames links the inquisition with medieval and modern concepts of popular religion. Under the rubric of twelfth-century culture, Maureen C. Miller uses eleventh-century Roman frescoes to rethink reform, Jonathan R. Lyon unpacks Otto of Freising’s notions of advocacy and tyranny, Rachel Koopmans traces testimonial letters associated with the cult of Thomas Becket, Dyan Elliot deliberates on the importance of what she calls counterfactual, or alternative, realities in twelfth-century thought and literature, and Giles Constable traces manifestations of the cross in monastic life. Three essays study Jews and Christians in society. Susan Einbinder probes the connections between martyrdom, politics, and poetry in thirteenth-century Castile, William Chester Jordan traces anti-Judaism in the Christina Psalter, and David C. Mengel highlights the significance of urban space for Jews in fourteenth-century Prague and Nuremberg. Lastly, contributors explore topics in late medieval religious life, a special focus of Van Engen’s scholarship. Walter Simons edits and analyzes a letter defending beguines in the Low Countries, William J. Courtenay traces the effects on pastoral care of papal provisions to university scholars, and James D. Mixson reinterprets the fifteenth-century treatise Firefly. An essay by Marcela K. Perett looks at vernacular anti-Hussite treatises, Daniel Hobbins employs a fifteenth-century Italian story about Antichrist to consider hearsay, belief and doubt, and Roy Hammerling contemplates Martin Luther’s understanding of himself as a beggar.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Christianity in Evolution

An Exploration

Jack Mahoney

Evolution has provided a new understanding of reality, with revolutionary consequences for Christianity. In an evolutionary perspective the incarnation involved God entering the evolving human species to help it imitate the trinitarian altruism in whose image it was created and counter its tendency to self-absorption. Primarily, however, the evolutionary achievement of Jesus was to confront and overcome death in an act of cosmic significance, ushering humanity into the culminating stage of its evolutionary destiny, the full sharing of God’s inner life. Previously such doctrines as original sin, the fall, sacrifice, and atonement stemmed from viewing death as the penalty for sin and are shown not only to have serious difficulties in themselves, but also to emerge from a Jewish culture preoccupied with sin and sacrifice that could not otherwise account for death. The death of Jesus on the cross is now seen as saving humanity, not from sin, but from individual extinction and meaninglessness. Death is now seen as a normal process that affect all living things and the religious doctrines connected with explaining it in humans are no longer required or justified. Similar evolutionary implications are explored affecting other subjects of Christian belief, including the Church, the Eucharist, priesthood, and moral behavior.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Christianity's Quiet Success

The Eusebius Gallicanus Sermon Collection and the Power of the Church in Late Antique Gaul

Lisa Kaaren Bailey

Lisa Kaaren Bailey’s Christianity’s Quiet Success: The Eusebius Gallicanus Sermon Collection and the Power of the Church in Late Antique Gaul is the first major study of the Eusebius Gallicanus collection of anonymous, multi-authored sermons from fifth- and sixth-century Gaul. Bailey sheds new light on these sermons, which were strikingly popular and influential from late antiquity to the High Middle Ages, as the large number of surviving manuscripts attests. They were used for centuries by clergy as a preaching guide and by monks and pious lay people as devotional reading. Bailey’s analysis demonstrates the extent to which these stylistically simple and straightforward sermons emphasize consensus, harmony, and mutuality as the central values of a congregation. Preachers encouraged tolerance among their congregants and promoted a model of leadership that placed themselves at the center of the community rather than above it. These sermons make clear the delicate balancing act required of late antique and warly medieval pastors as they attempted to explain the Christian faith and also maintain the clerical control considered necessary for a universal church. The Eusebius Gallicanus collection gives us fresh insight inyo the process by which the Catholic Church influenced the lives of Western Europeans.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Church and Society

The Laurence J. McGinley Lectures, 1988-2007

Avery Cardinal Dulles

One of the leading theologians of our time, Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J., has written and lectured on a wide range of topics across his distinguished career, and for a wide range of audiences. Integrating faith and scholarship, he has created a rich body of work that, in the words of one observer, is both faithful to Catholic tradition and fresh in its engagement with the contemporary world.Here, brought together for the first time in one volume, are the talks Cardinal Dulles has given twice each year since the Laurence J. McGinley Lectures were initiated in 1988, conceived broadly as a forum on Church and society. The result is a diverse collection that reflects the breadth of his thinking and engages with many of the most important-and difficult-religious issues of our day.Organized chronologically, the lectures are often responses to timely issues, such as the relationship between religion and politics, a topic he treated in the last weeks of the presidential campaign of 1992. Other lectures take up questions surrounding human rights, faith and evolution, forgiveness, the death penalty, the doctrine of religious freedom, the population of hell, and a whole array of theological subjects, many of which intersect with culture and politics. The life of the Church is a major and welcome focus of the lectures, whether they be a reflection on Cardinal Newman or an exploration of the difficulties of interfaith dialogue. Dulles responds frequently to initiatives of the Holy See, discussing gender and priesthood in the context of church teaching, and Pope Benedict's interpretation of Vatican II. Writing with clarity and conviction, Cardinal Dulles seeks to render the wisdom of past ages applicable to the world in which we live.For those seeking to share in this wisdom, this book will be a consistently rewarding guide to what it means to be Catholic-indeed, to be a person of any faith-in a world of rapid, relentless change.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Church Confronts Modernity

Catholicism since 1950 in the United States, Ireland, and Quebec

Leslie Woodcock Tentler

The Church Confronts Modernity assesses the history of Roman Catholicism since 1950 in the United States, the Republic of Ireland, and the Canadian province of Quebec

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Church Fully Engaged

Yves Congar's Vision of Ecclesial Authority

Anthony Oelrich

The French Dominican, Fr. Yves Congar, was deeply convinced that in the church's ongoing tension with the secular world it was led to adopt very much the same attitudes as the temporal power itself, to conceive of itself as a society, as a power, when in reality it was a communion, with ministers and servants. It was Congar's lifelong theological project to help restore to the church a more evangelical, gospel-based understanding of her life. From the vast corpus of this great expert of the Second Vatican Council, this book gathers his efforts as they pertain specifically to the issue of authority in the church. The often hot-button nature of any discussion on how authority is exercised in the church will only benefit from the retrieval of the theological tradition on this issue brought forth by Congar. Congar's Vision ultimately demands that our understanding of authority must flow from our understanding of God as a Trinity of Persons and, therefore, be practiced in the mutuality of relationship and always be directed at growth in authentic relationship.Fr. Anthony Oelrich is a priest of the Diocese of St. Cloud, Minnesota, serving as rector and pastor of three parishes and the diocesan director of continuing education for clergy. He received his doctorate in theology from the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Church

Living Communion

Paul Lakeland

Drawing on the wisdom and teaching experience of highly respected theologians, the Engaging Theology series builds a firm foundation for graduate study and other ministry formation programs. Each of the six volumes 'Scripture, Jesus, God, Discipleship, Anthropology, and Church 'is concerned with retrieving, carefully evaluating, and constructively interpreting the Christian tradition. Comprehensive in scope and accessibly written, these volumes, used together or independently, will stimulate rich theological reflection and discussion. More important, the series will create and sustain the passion of the next generation of theologians and church leaders.Pal Lakeland's recent award-winning books on the place of the laity in the contemporary Roman Catholic Church have prepared him well to take on this ecclesiology from below." While paying close attention to the classical "marks of the Church, "Lakeland's focus is on what we can learn about the nature of the Church as living communion by examining the values and practices of ordinary believers. Following the advice of Bernard Lonergan, Lakeland adopts a resolutely inductive approach to ecclesial reflection. He explores ten questions that the Church must address, both those that affect the internal workings of the faith community and those that have to do with its relationships to other groups, religious and secular. Finally, he offers a constructive proposal for a contextual ecclesiology of the U.S. Catholic Church that utilizes the images of hospice, pilgrim, immigrant, and pioneer.Pal Lakeland is the Aloysius P. Kelley SJ Professor of Catholic Studies, and director of the Center for Catholic Studies at Fairfield University. He is active in the American Academy of Religion, the Catholic Theological Society of America, and the Workgroup for Constructive Theology. His two most recent writings, both winners of Catholic Press Association awards, are The Liberation of the Laity: In Search of an Accountable Church and Catholicism at the Crossroads: How the Laity Can Save the Church."

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Church, State, and Society

An Introduction to Catholic Social Doctrine

Church, State, and Society explains the nuanced understanding of human dignity and the common good found in the Catholic intellectual tradition.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

A Cloud of Witnesses

An Introduction to the Development of Christian Doctrine to AD 500

David N. Bell
Includes photos and illustrations

First published in 1989, A Cloud of Witnesses has been completelyrewritten to incorporate a multitude of minor amendments and a considerableamount of additional information. Like the first edition, it is intended as an introduction to the formative first five hundred years of the Christian theological tradition. In these pages the opinions and personalities of the Fathers of the Church that emerge are presented against the intellectual, social, and politicalworld of their times, but since the book is only an introduction, the author presentsthe development of Christian doctrine in a rather more logical and cohesivemanner than was the case in reality.

David N. Bell is University Research Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at The memorial University of Newfoundland. A graduate of the Universities of Leeds and Oxford, he has written on diverse subjects from the desert monastic tradition to the libraries of the medieval and seventeenth-century abbeys, taught courses in Asian as well as European religious traditions, and has translated works from Coptic, Greek, and Latin.

previous PREV 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 NEXT next

Results 71-80 of 422

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (412)
  • (10)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access