We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Browse Results For:

Religion > Biblical Studies

previous PREV 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 NEXT next

Results 91-100 of 408

:
:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Contours of Old Testament Theology

By Bernhard W. Anderson

In this masterwork, one of America's leading biblical scholars takes a fresh look at the theology of the Old Testament. Anderson cuts his own path and provides us with creative new insights on all the major sections of the Old Testament. He illuminates the nuances of the various covenants and theological shifts in a highly readable style. His conversation partners include the formative contributors from both the Christian community (Eichrodt, von Rad, Childs) and the Jewish community (Heschel, Herberg, Levenson) while interacting with the most recent developments in the field, especially Walter Brueggemann's Theology of the Old Testament.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Creation Is Groaning

Biblical and Theological Perspectives

Mary L. Coloe, PBVM

If, as some scholars attest, Christianity has been complicit in the destruction of the environment, then Christianity can and must also have a role in changing human behavior in a way that helps to solve this massive problem. In Creation is Groaning, a set of highly regarded theologians and Scripture scholars offer a theology and spirituality of creation based on principles of eco-justice and environmental responsibility.Contributors to this volume are Denis Edwards, Antoinette Collins, Dermot Nestor, Laurie Woods, Mary Coloe, and Anthony Kelly. Key elements of their project include: ·tracing the development of Israel's view of creation through different historical situations and key writings, with a particular focus on what ethical responsibilities toward creation emerge from its theology ·examining Israel's theology of Sabbath" and its developing understanding of the end time, thus encompassing creation in its origins and its final destiny ·considering the cosmic impact of the Jesus event as Paul and John understood itTogether, the authors establish a firm foundation for a new ethic that promotes the flourishing of all planetary life and a just global community.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Creative Word

Canon as a Model for Biblical Education

by Walter Brueggemann with a Foreword by Amy Erickson

Every faith community knows the challenges of inviting new members and the next generation into its shared life without falling into an arid traditionalism or a shallow relativism. Renowned scholar Walter Brueggemann finds a framework for education in the structure of the Hebrew Bible canon, with its assertion of center and limit (in the Torah), of challenge (in the Prophets), and of inquiry (in the Writings). Incorporating the best insights from his own career and from the fields of canonical criticism, Old Testament theology, and pedagogical theory, Brueggemann offers a vision of how the community can draw on the shape of Scripture to educate its members. First published in 1982, The Creative Word is now updated and introduced with a foreword by Amy Erickson of Iliff School of Theology.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Critical Edition of Q

edited by James M. Robinson, Paul Hoffmann, and John S. Kloppenborg

A major new resource on the text and traditions of the Sayings Gospel. The existence of Q (simply defined as the non-Markan material common to Matthew and Luke) as a document in the earliest churches was first hypothesized by C. H. Weisse in 1838. The existence, character, and significance of Q as a document from primitive Christianity has further been developed since then by numerous scholars, including the two groundbreaking Fortress Press books by John S. Kloppenborg: The Formation of Q (1987) and Excavating Q (2000). Q remains a subject of heated debate. The Q material consists mainly of sayings of Jesus, but begins with some sayings of John the Baptist. For the most part narratives are missing; most conspicuously of all is the Passion Narrative. The critical text edition will include an introduction; the running text of Q; new translations of Q in English, German, and French; the fully formatted Greek text of Q with parallels in Matthew, Luke, Mark, Gospel of Thomas, and other gospels wherever relevant; a concordance; and a bibliography. This book is a cooperative venture between Fortress Press and Peeters Publishers (Leuven, Belgium). This also is the first volume of Hermeneia Supplements.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Cross and Resurrection

God's Wonder and Mystery

by Klaus Schwarzwäller; translated by Ken Sundet Jones and Mark C. Mattes

German theologian, Klaus Schwarzwäller reclaims Christ's cross and resurrection as God's wonder and mystery. He connects with art, history, contemporary culture, and especially scripture in presenting a trenchant analysis of the modes of power and production that have undergirded both society and the church since the Enlightenment.

The church in the present era comes under the power of the Enlightenment's quest for truth in the measurable, reproducible, and rational. The proof of the Spirit’s power thus comes to depend on the criteria of reason and theory, rather than on the Spirit’s work in the reality of daily life.

When the church and theology operate in this way, the cross and resurrection become something that requires our management, manipulation, or expert interpretation. Thus, the church and theology wind up existing for their own ends, and freedom and faith are replaced with brutal indifference and control.

The truth of the gospel is that on the cross Christ bore the brunt of power and production that could not bear his utter devotion to God and care for the powerless. The cross excludes our control and the power of the resurrection ensures that the negativity of human life borne on the cross will be overcome.

Schwarzwäller calls the church and theologians to relinquish both their conformity to society and the indifference that power and production create and instead focus on tending to God’s word so that the cross and resurrection are again revealed as God’s wonder and mystery.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Cross before Constantine

The Early Life of a Christian Symbol

by Bruce W. Longenecker

This book brings together, for the first time, the relevant material evidence demonstrating Christian use of the cross prior to Constantine. Bruce W. Longenecker upends a longstanding consensus that the cross was not a Christian symbol until Constantine appropriated it to consolidate his power in the fourth century. Longenecker presents a wide variety of artifacts from across the Mediterranean basin that testify to the use of the cross as a visual symbol by some pre-Constantinian Christians. Those artifacts interlock with literary witnesses from the same period to provide a consistent and robust portrait of the cross as a pre-Constantinian symbol of Christian devotion. The material record of the pre-Constantinian period illustrates that Constantine did not invent the cross as a symbol of Christian faith; for an impressive number of Christians before Constantine’s reign, the cross served as a visual symbol of commitment to a living deity in a dangerous world.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

The Cultural Life Setting of the Proverbs

by John J. Pilch

Often, readers and commentators read the Proverbs as “timeless” observations and recommendations regarding human nature, valid for all cultures and places. This blunts their cultural relevance, argues John J. Pilch. For example, proverbs regarding the “good wife” and the “quarrelsome wife” take on different meaning in a context where a married couple were rarely in close daily contact, and the predominantly masculine language used in the Proverbs points to the different cultural spheres of men and women and the different child-rearing practices employed with boys and girls. Similar in approach and format to the Social-Science Commentary on the New Testament volumes that he authored with Richard L. Rohrbaugh and Bruce J. Malina, this volume explores and describes the cultural matrix of the Mediterranean world from which the Proverbs come and of which they are descriptive. The biblical text is paired with commentary addressing those proverbs and proverb collections with particular bearing on patterns of social roles and expectations. A list of social-science “scenarios” provides ready reference to particular aspects of the large cultural area of the ancient Mediterranean region and North Africa.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Dangerous Sisters of the Hebrew Bible

By Amy Kalmanofsky

Fathers, sons, and mothers take center stage in the Bible’s grand narratives, Amy Kalmanofsky observes. Sisters and sisterhood receive less attention in scholarship but, she argues, play an important role in narratives, revealing anxieties related to desire, agency, and solidarity among women playing out (and playing against) their roles in a patrilineal society. Most often, she shows, sisters are destabilizing figures in narratives about family crisis, where property, patrimony, and the resilience of community boundaries are at risk. Kalmanofsky demonstrates that the particular role of sisters had important narrative effects, revealing previously underappreciated dynamics in Israelite society.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Daniel

A Commentary on the Book of Daniel

by John J. Collins

The most comprehensive English-language commentary on Daniel in 65 years. Collins situates the Old Testament in its historical context and offers a full explanation of the text, especially its religious imagery.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Dark Mirrors

Azazel and Satanael in Early Jewish Demonology

Discusses the two most important figures in early Jewish mythologies of evil, the fallen angels Azazel and Satanael. Dark Mirrors is a wide-ranging study of two central figures in early Jewish demonology—the fallen angels Azazel and Satanael. Andrei A. Orlov explores the mediating role of these paradigmatic celestial rebels in the development of Jewish demonological traditions from Second Temple apocalypticism to later Jewish mysticism, such as that of the Hekhalot and Shi>ur Qomah materials. Throughout, Orlov makes use of Jewish pseudepigraphical materials in Slavonic that are not widely known. Orlov traces the origins of Azazel and Satanael to different and competing mythologies of evil, one to the Fall in the Garden of Eden, the other to the revolt of angels in the antediluvian period. Although Azazel and Satanael are initially representatives of rival etiologies of corruption, in later Jewish and Christian demonological lore each is able to enter the other’s stories in new conceptual capacities. Dark Mirrors also examines the symmetrical patterns of early Jewish demonology that are often manifested in these fallen angels’ imitation of the attributes of various heavenly beings, including principal angels and even God himself.

previous PREV 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 NEXT next

Results 91-100 of 408

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (406)
  • (2)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access