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Texas Tech University Press

Website: http://www.ttup.ttu.edu/

Texas Tech University Press, in business since 1971, publishes nonfiction titles in the areas of natural history and the natural sciences; eighteenth-century and Joseph Conrad studies; studies of modern Southeast Asia, particularly the Vietnam War; costume and textile history; and all aspects of the Great Plains and the American West, especially biography, history, memoir, and travel. In addition, the Press publishes one invited poetry manuscript annually and occasionally a regional novel with national appeal.


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Texas Tech University Press

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Vietnam Labyrinth Cover

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Vietnam Labyrinth

Allies, Enemies, and Why the U.S. Lost the War

Tran Ngoc Chau, with Ken Fermoyle; foreword by Daniel Ellsberg

The Way of Oz Cover

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The Way of Oz

A Guide to Wisdom, Heart, and Courage

Robert V. Smith, with illustrations by Dusty Higgins

You’ve met them in your own life: the influential mentor who made a difference. The public servant whose energy and dedication were an inspiration to all. The business leader who overcame adversity and succeeded in an admirable endeavor. The visionary who drew an entire community or organization together. You may not realize that you’ve also met them in a classic of American literature and cinema. Veteran educator Robert V. Smith adopts the virtues of the beloved and familiar characters from the Wizard of Oz stories, along with the trials and triumphs of their creator, L. Frank Baum, as a road map for personal and professional growth. The magical archetypes of the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, the Cowardly Lion, Dorothy, Toto, and the Wizard guide readers—especially those preparing for college and career—to a deeper understanding of lifelong learning, loving, serving, and leading. Smith blends Baum’s fascinating biography and publishing history with practical advice and philosophy drawn from a rich array of sources. Further, the book’s chapters are enhanced with rich video content linked by interactive codes. For seekers and teachers alike, The Way of Oz opens the door to an imaginative, inspiring journey and challenges all aspirants to make a difference in their work and world.

Where the West Begins Cover

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Where the West Begins

Debating Texas Identity

Glen Sample Ely, with foreword by Alwyn Barr

Unsure which of its legacies are true and which to embrace, Texas grapples with an identity crisis. One camp insists that the state’s roots in slavery, segregation, and cotton make it southern. Another argues that its Native and ranching history make it western. Outside Texas, southern and western historians who don’t know what to make of the state ignore it altogether. In his innovative settling of the question, Glen Sample Ely examines the state’s historical DNA, making sense of Lone Star identity west of the hundredth meridian and defining Texas’s place in the American West.Focusing on the motives that shape how Texans appropriate their past—from cashing in on tourism to avoiding historical realities—Ely reveals the inner workings of a multiplicity of Texas identities.

Will Rogers Cover

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Will Rogers

A Political Life

Richard D. White, Jr.

He was the top male box office attraction at the movies, one of the most widely read newspaper columnists in America, a radio commentator with an audience of more than 60 million, and a globetrotting speaker who filled lecture halls across the land. But how did humorist Will Rogers also become one of the most powerful political figures of his day?From just before World War I, through the Roaring Twenties, Prohibition, and the Great Depression, Rogers provided a refreshing yet sobering appraisal of current events and public policy. Through him, millions formed their opinion of President Wilson’s quest for a League of Nations, debated freedom of speech and religion during the Scopes Monkey Trial, questioned the success of several disarmament conferences, took pity upon the sufferers of the Great Flood of 1927, and tried to grasp the awful reality of the Great Depression.Rogers visited Washington often to attend congressional sessions and official receptions, testify at hearings, meet with cabinet officers, and speak at the exclusive Gridiron and Alfalfa Clubs. His open access to the Oval Office, the Senate cloakroom, and other inner sancta of national power was unmatched for someone not holding public office.In this groundbreaking biography Richard D. White argues that the nation’s most popular entertainer was not only an incisive political commentator but also a significant influence upon national leaders and their decisions. When Will Rogers perished in a plane crash in Alaska in 1935, Americans lost their most popular and beloved humorist, a man who put smiles on their faces, took their minds off war and depression and, for a moment, allowed them to laugh at his cracker-barrel humor and ultimately themselves. But Americans also lost their most trusted source of reason, a man who, more than any other, broke down the complex issues of the day and gave them a critically honest appraisal of American politics and world affairs.

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William Carlos Williams Review

Vol. 26 (2006) through current issue

Devoted to critical discussion of the life and times of the American poet at the center of postwar poetry, the William Carlos Williams Review invites articles exploring all aspects of literature and life in light of the influence and times of William Carlos Williams.

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