Browse Results For:

TCU Press

previous PREV 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 NEXT next

Results 41-50 of 83

:
:
Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

If in Later Years

Ron Moore

If in Later Years is filled with poems of depth and insight that provoke, engage, surprise, and astound. Reading Ron Moore’s second collection of poetry takes readers on journeys around the world and back through the ages of time. Each poem is written with great insight, learning, and craft, and each invites multiple readings and reflection.

From a Tibetan monk sitting in silence and contemplating the atom to a love affair with Buenos Aires, Moore takes his readers on journeys that are both personal and profound. While each poem has its own voice and beauty, Moore shapes all of them with lyrical and mindful skill. Unafraid to tackle the hard questions of philosophy, aesthetics, consciousness, and art, he uses his poems to delve into themes of desire, loss, love, beauty, and the distant horizons of the mind.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

In the Rough

The Business Game of Golf

David Hueber

There has never been a book about the inner workings of the golf business or its leading players from an insider’s point of view. In the Rough reads like a novel, but it could also be required reading in a business school. This book takes the reader on a ride through the author’s unusual professional career and what he discovered in the most revealing settings and scenes of the golf industry at its awkward and colorful best. Most of the events and incidents appearing here are firsthand accounts portraying a host of famous and colorful characters in both golf and the business world.

The central characters in this book are Ben Hogan, one of the five best players of all time and a highly successful golf-equipment executive; Deane Beman, a star amateur and successful professional golfer who became the commissioner and invented the modern-day PGA Tour; and Minoru Isutani, a wealthy Japanese entrepreneur who is probably best known for having lost $350 million on the purchase and sale of Pebble Beach. Some of the other costars include Jack Nicklaus, Karsten Solheim (Ping Golf Company), Greg Norman, and Ely Callaway—all names you have seen etched on a wood, an iron, or a putter, among other places.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

In Their Shoes

In Their Shoes

Grace Halsell

Probably no American journalist, man or woman, has had a more extraordinary career than Grace Halsell. Before President Lyndon Johnson personally hired her to work in the White House, Halsell had, over a period of two decades, written her way around the world - Europe, the Middle East, Africa, the Orient, and the Americas.

Born on the windswept plains of West Texas, Halsell was encouraged from the age of five by her pioneer father, who had led cattle drives on the Chisolm Trail, "to travel, to get the benefit" of knowing other peoples. She began her travels at the age of twenty, going first to Mexico and then touring the British Isles by bicycle. Halsell studied at the Sorbonne in Paris and lived in London, Tokyo, Berlin, and Seoul.

In Hong Kong, where she lived on a fishing junk with a Chineses family of nineteen, she wrote a column for the Tiger Standard; in Tokyo, where she slept on tatami mats, ate raw fish and took scalding ofuro baths, she was a columnist for the Japan Times. Moving to South America, she traveled on a tug for 2,000 miles down the Amazon and crossed the Andes by jeep. In Lima, she became a columnist for the Spanish-langauge daily, La Prensa.

Halsell has seen the Big Buddha, the Taj Mahal, the pyramids and the Machu Micchu, has interviewed presidents, movie stars, kinds, and prime ministers. Her newspaper dispatches for the New York Herald Tribune, the New York Post, and the Christian Science Monitor have datelined war zones in Korea, Vietnam, and Bosnia, as well as Russia, China, Macedonia, and Albania.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Incident at Ashton

Jay Milner

Republished with a foreword by John Tisdale, director of TCU’s School of Journalism, the late Jay Milner’s novel is a riveting portrayal of a scenario that unhappily mirrored real-life incidents throughout the South in the mid-twentieth century.

In Ashton, a fictional town in the deep South, an elderly black man walks into the courthouse one day and makes a simple request. He wants to register to vote. At first the clerk is confused. Never before in the town’s history had a Negro displayed such arrogance. The clerk tries to discourage him, but the old man is adamant. A few days later they pull his body from the river, a gaping wound in his head. Only a few years earlier, this incident would have gone practically unnoticed in Ashton. But that time has passed. Phil Arrow, a young newspaperman, demands a full measure of justice from the people of his town.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Inside Texas

Culture, Identity and Houses, 1878–1920

Cynthia A. Brandimarte

“Inside Texas: Culture, Identity and Houses, 1878–1920” is a 464 page book with 296 photos that tests and rejects the notion that Texas homes, like all things Texan, were unique and different.  Over the 40 year time span covered by the book, decorating ideas nationally and in Texas went from the era of Victorianism with “all that stuff” to the spare, clean lines of the arts and crafts movement. By 1920, like Americans across the country, many Texans, especially the wealthier, were taking their decorating ideas from the new professionals – architects and designers – and their homes reflected less their own identity than the taste and eye of the decorator.

In seven years of research, Brandimarte traveled the state, collecting photographs of interiors of Texas homes – rare in comparison to exterior views.  The images reprinted here are arranged neither in chronological order nor according to decorating style but by identities –occupation, family, ethnicity, social group, region, culture and refinement, class and style.  Brief biographical information about the homeowners is incorporated into the text.

“Inside Texas” is about people and houses.  It is social history, a significant contribution to scholarship, an invaluable resource for preservationist, docents, architects and designers as well as a book to be treasured by anyone who loves old houses. 


Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Karla K. Morton

New and Selected Poems

Karla K. Morton

As the 2010 Texas Poet Laureate, Karla K. Morton believes that poetry is every man’s art, and has carved her place in Texas Letters with this stunning collection. Her poems take you on a journey; her flowing, storytelling style sparks memories and stirs emotions.  This beautiful, linen hardbound book is a word-lover’s dream.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Killing Cynthia Ann

Charles Brashear

The saga of Cynthia Ann Parker is well known to historians of the Texas frontier and readers of historical fiction. Kidnapped from Parker's Fort near Mexia by raiding Comanches in 1836, she was completely assimilated into the Noconi band. She married tribal leader Peta Nocona and bore him two sons, Quanah and Pecos, and a daughter, Toh-Tsee-Ah. Late in 1860, she and toddler Topsannah (as the whites called her) were recaptured by Texas Rangers and returned to "civilization" and the extended Parker clan.

Cynthia Ann never adapted to white culture. She was shunted from one Parker family to another, living in constant grief and doubt—about herself and her daughter and about the fate of her Comanche family still on the prairies. Convinced she was a captive of the Texans, Cynthia Ann was determined to escape to the high plains and the Comanche way. The Parkers neither cared for nor understood Cynthia Ann's obsession with returning to her homeland and her people.
Charles Brashear's thoroughly researched and vividly realistic novel, Killing Cynthia Ann, tells the story as it might have happened and turns it into a compelling and unforgettable drama.

“Basing his fictional speculation on a careful reading of the historical record, Brashear chronicles the heartbreaking descent into despair of a proud woman who could not forget her warrior husband and two sons. . . [The public] will appreciate this engrossing novel, which can also supply a personal perspective to supplement history texts.”--Library Journal

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Larry D. Thomas

New and Selected Poems

Larry Thomas

A mature poet, Larry Thomas has an extraordinary gift which has evolved through decades at his craft. Thomas explores the natural world of Texas—its animal icons like the Hereford or hawk or rattlesnake, the larger-than-life geography, which is the stuff out of which legends are made.

Thomas captures the spirit of place within larger truths that “travel well,” as editor Billy Bob Hill explains in his introduction. Hill also takes careful note of the poet’s deft alliteration and just-right compression of language as he urges readers to enjoy Thomas’ poems for their Texas elements but also the worldly art therein.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Lay Bare the Heart

An Autobiography of the Civil Rights Movement

James Farmer

Texas native James Farmer is one of the “Big Four” of the turbulent 1960s civil rights movement, along with Martin Luther King Jr., Roy Wilkins, and Whitney Young. Farmer might be called the forgotten man of the movement, overshadowed by Martin Luther King Jr., who was deeply influenced by Farmer’s interpretation of Gandhi’s concept of nonviolent protest.

Born in Marshall, Texas, in 1920, the son of a preacher, Farmer grew up with segregated movie theaters and “White Only” drinking fountains. This background impelled him to found the Congress of Racial Equality in 1942. That same year he mobilized the first sit-in in an all-white restaurant near the University of Chicago. Under Farmer’s direction, CORE set the pattern for the civil rights movement by peaceful protests which eventually led to the dramatic “Freedom Rides” of the 1960s.

In Lay Bare the Heart Farmer tells the story of the heroic civil rights struggle of the 1950s and 1960s. This moving and unsparing personal account captures both the inspiring strengths and human weaknesses of a movement beset by rivalries, conflicts and betrayals. Farmer recalls meetings with Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Jack and Bobby Kennedy, Adlai Stevenson (for whom he had great respect), and Lyndon Johnson (who, according to Farmer, used Adam Clayton Powell Jr., to thwart a major phase of the movement).

James Farmer has courageously worked for dignity for all people in the United States. In this book, he tells his story with forthright honesty.

First published in 1985 by Arbor House, this edition contains a new foreword by Don Carleton, director of the Dolph BriscoeCenter for American History at the University of Texas at Austin, and a new preface.

Access Restricted no This search result is for a Book

Legacy of the Sacred Harp

Chloe Webb

Brought to this continent by the settlers of Jamestown, the sacred harp, which refers to the human voice, is known as “fasola.” In Legacy of the Sacred Harp, author Chloe Webb follows the history of this musical form back four hundred years, and in the process uncovers the harrowing legacy of her Dumas family line.

previous PREV 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 NEXT next

Results 41-50 of 83

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Publishers

TCU Press

Content Type

  • (83)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access