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Texas A&M University Press

Texas A&M University Press

Website: http://www.tamupress.com/catalog/CategoryInfo.aspx?cid=152

Texas A&M University Press concentrations include nautical archaeology, environmental sustainability, military history, presidential studies, borderland studies, and a significant contribution to Texas history and regional landscaping, wildlife, and exploration.


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Texas A&M University Press

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Archie P. McDonald

A Life in Texas History

Archie P. McDonald

Historian Archie P. McDonald (1935–2012) retired in 2008 as director of the East Texas Historical Association and editor of the East Texas Historical Journal after thirty-seven years of service. A beloved professor and author of numerous books, he charted the course of the ETHA and served as leader of several organizations. He was an inspiration to countless students, colleagues, and others who share a common appreciation for Lone Star history. Dan K. Utley sat down with McDonald on several occasions to capture and preserve his experiences for posterity.

The resulting memoir not only serves to trace McDonald’s life and career but also reveals much about the maturation of a scholarly organization and its journal. McDonald was an evangelist for the study of history who believed in an open tent. This book is a valentine to both the memory of Archie McDonald and the association he served, as well as an important contribution to the historiography of Texas.

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Architectural Project

By Alfonso Corona-Martínez; Edited by Malcolm Quantrill; Foreword by Marco Frascari

An Essay Concerning the Project considers the practice of architectural design as it has developed during the last two centuries. In this challenging interpretation of design education and its effect on design process and products, Argentinean scholar Alfonso Corona-Martinez emphasizes the distinction between an architectural project, created in the architect’s mind and materialized as a set of drawings on paper, and the realized three-dimensional building. Corona-Martinez demonstrates how representation plays a substantial role in determining both the notion and the character of architecture, and he traces this relationship from the Renaissance into the Modern era, giving detailed considerations of Functionalism and Typology. His argument clarifies the continuity in the practice of design method through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, a continuity that has been obscured by the emphasis on changing goals instead of design procedures, and examines the influences of modernity and the legend of the Bauhaus. Architectural schooling, he suggests, has had a decisive role in the transmission of these practices. He concludes that the methods formalized in Beaux Arts teaching are not only still with us but are in good part responsible for the stylistic instability that haunts Modern architecture. Abstract but not abstruse, An Essay Concerning the Project provides clear information for a deeper understanding of the process of design and its results. More so than any other recent text, it shows the scope and richness of the field of speculation in architecture. It presents subtle considerations that must be mastered if an architect is to properly use typology, the means of representation, and the elements of composition and in architecture. Students, teachers, and practitioners alike will benefit from its warning about the deeper aspects of the endeavor of architecture.

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Art from the Trenches

America's Uniformed Artists in World War I

Alfred Emile Cornebise

Since ancient times, wars have inspired artists and their patrons to commemorate victories. When the United States finally entered World War I, American artists and illustrators were commissioned to paint and draw it. These artists’ commissions, however, were as captains for their patron: the U.S. Army. The eight men—William J. Aylward, Walter J. Duncan, Harvey T. Dunn, George M. Harding, Wallace Morgan, Ernest C. Peixotto, J. Andre Smith, and Harry E. Townsent—arrived in France early in 1918 with the American Expeditionary forces (AEF).

Alfred Emile Cornebise presents here the first comprehensive account of the U.S. Army art program in World War I. The AEF artists saw their role as one of preserving images of the entire aspect of American involvement in a way that photography could not.

Unsure of what to do with these official artists, AEF leadership in France issues passes that allowed them relative freedom to move about, sketching as they went and finding supplies and lodgings where they could. But the bureaucratic confusion over the artists’ mission soon created controversy in Washington. The army brass there was dismayed at the slow trickle of art coming in and at some of the bucolic, behind-the-lines scenes, which held little promise as dramatic magazine illustrations or propaganda.

The Armistice came only a matter of months after the American Artists arrived in France, and they marched into the Rhineland with the American occupation forces, sketching along the way. Soon returning to France the artists went into separate studios to finish their works, but the army hurriedly discharged them and they were civilian artists once more.

The author conducted research for this book in the World War I army records in the National Archives, as well as the collections of the Smithsonian Institution, and others throughout the country. The sixty-six black-and-white pictures reproduced here are some of the approximately five hundred pieces of official AEF combat art, which shortly after the war were turned over to the Smithsonian Institution, where most of them remain.

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The Art of Found Objects

Interviews with Texas Artists

Robert Craig Bunch

In this first book of interviews with visual artists from across Texas, more than sixty artists reflect on topics from seminal influences and inspirations to their common engagement with found materials. Beyond the art itself, no source is more primary to understanding art and artist than the artist’s own words. After all, who can speak with more authority about the artist’s influences, motivations, methods, philosophies, and creations?

Since 2010, Robert Craig Bunch has interviewed sixty-four of Texas’ finest artists, who have responded with honesty, clarity, and—naturally—great insight into their own work. None of these interviews has been previously published, even in part. Incorporating a striking, full-color illustration of each artist’s work, these absorbing self-examinations will stand collectively as a reference of lasting value.

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The Art of the Woman

The Life and Work of Elisabet Ney

Emily Fourmy Cutrer

The Art of the Woman explores the life of German-born Elisabet Ney, a flamboyant sculptor who transfixed the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer and left the court of the half-mad Ludwig of Bavaria to put down new roots in Texas. Born in 1833, Ney gained notoriety in Europe by sculpting the busts of such figures as Ludwig II, Schopenhauer, Garibaldi, and Bismarck. In 1871 she abruptly emigrated to America and became something of a recluse until resuming her sculpting career two decades later. In Texas, she was known for stormy relationships with officials, patrons, and women’s organizations. Her works included sculptures of Sam Houston and Stephen F. Austin and are exhibited in the state and US capitols as well as the Smithsonian.

 Emily Fourmy Cutrer’s biography of Ney makes extensive use of primary sources and was the first to appraise both Ney’s legend and individual works of art. Cutrer argues that Ney was an accomplished sculptor coming out of a neglected German neoclassical tradition and that, whatever her failures and eccentricities, she was an important catalyst to cultural activity in Texas.

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As If Light Actually Matters

New and Selected Poems

Larry D. Thomas

The present volume draws on nine book-length collections of Thomas’s poetry, and includes a generous selection of new poems.

Five of the collections are comprised of poems of geographic place, four of which are set primarily in Texas. His fifth “place” collection is set on the coast of Maine. The poems selected from his remaining collections range in subject matter from outlaw bikers to ekphrasis; from the avian world to an asylum for the criminally insane.

PIANO TUNER
The tools of his trade
are unassuming and relatively
primitive.  The stagehand
is his counterpart in drama.
 
In the shadows of architects,
for grand cathedrals of sonatas,
he lays the bricks.  Of pitch
and tone, he is master.
Even a concert pianist
steers clear of his ear.

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Ascension

J. Scott Brownlee

Set in the drought-plagued landscape of Central Texas, Ascension is a collection of lyric poems that chronicle life in and around Llano, Texas (population 3,033).  Brownlee’s poems meditate on the inescapability of place.  .

“In Ascension, J. Scott Brownlee takes us through the small towns and back woods of the Texas Hill Country, always with a keen sense of character and a fine ear for the beauties of language. This is a terrific collection of poems.” —Kevin Prufer, Final Judge


Organ Solo with Oblivion and Gar

Skittish fish lay eggs
  in this shallow stone
   cleft of an algae chorus.  
    Turn my soul into song,
      if you can, River Lord.  
       Treat believing the same
        as each minnow slipping            
         coin-like into deep murk.
          Your spirit mimics me          
          unblinking, fishbone
          face framing brackish
         absence, saying, Kneel
        into this.  Lean low,
       sinner, & drink. Bitter
      infidel, swallow the black
     granite whole if you are not
    afraid of what comes after it:
   ___________. Live forever.

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Assumed Identities

The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World

Edited by John D. Garrigus and Christopher Morris; Introduction by Franklin W. Knight

With the recent election of the nation’s first African American president—an individual of blended Kenyan and American heritage who spent his formative years in Hawaii and Indonesia—the topic of transnational identity is reaching the forefront of the national consciousness in an unprecedented way. As our society becomes increasingly diverse and intermingled, it is increasingly imperative to understand how race and heritage impact our perceptions of and interactions with each other. Assumed Identities constitutes an important step in this direction. However, “identity is a slippery concept,” say the editors of this instructive volume. This is nowhere more true than in the melting pot of the early trans-Atlantic cultures formed in the colonial New World during the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. As the studies in this volume show, during this period in the trans-Atlantic world individuals and groups fashioned their identities but also had identities ascribed to them by surrounding societies. The historians who have contributed to this volume investigate these processes of multiple identity formation, as well as contemporary understandings of them. Originating in the 2007 Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures presented at the University of Texas at Arlington, Assumed Identities: The Meanings of Race in the Atlantic World examines, among other topics, perceptions of racial identity in the Chesapeake community, in Brazil, and in Saint-Domingue (colonial-era Haiti). As the contributors demonstrate, the cultures in which these studies are sited helped define the subjects’ self-perceptions and the ways others related to them.

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The Atchafalaya River Basin

History and Ecology of an American Wetland

Bryan P. Piazza

In this comprehensive, one-volume reference, Nature Conservancy scientist Bryan P. Piazza poses five key questions:
—What is the Atchafalaya River Basin?
—Why is it important?
—How have its hydrology and natural habitats been managed?
—What is its current state?
—How do we ensure its survival?
For more than five centuries, the Atchafalaya River Basin has captured the flow of the Mississippi River, becoming its main distributary as it reaches the Gulf of Mexico in south Louisiana. This dynamic environment, comprising almost a million acres of the lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and Mississippi River Deltaic Plain, is perhaps best known for its expansive swamp environments dominated by baldcypress, water tupelo, and alligators. But the Atchafalaya River Basin contains a wide range of habitats and one of the highest levels of biodiversity on the North American continent.     
Piazza has compiled and synthesized the body of scientific knowledge for the Atchafalaya River Basin, documenting the ecological state of the basin and providing a baseline of understanding. His research provides a crucial resource for future planning. He evaluates some common themes that have emerged from the research and identifies important scientific questions that remain unexplored.

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Attracting Birds in the Texas Hill Country

A Guide to Land Stewardship

Rufus Stephens

After years of working with landowners, land managers, naturalists, county officials, and others about wildlife management and land stewardship for birds in the Texas Hill Country, biologist Rufus Stephens and educator Jan Wrede teamed up to write a practical guidebook on how to improve habitat for birds on both small and large properties throughout the Hill Country.

Because each bird species has specific needs for cover, food, water, nesting, and rearing their young, the book is organized by Hill Country habitat types: wooded slopes and savannahs; grasslands; rivers and creeks; canyons, seeps, and springs; tanks and ponds; plus residential backyards. Each chapter contains an in-depth discussion of common problems and possible solutions for developing optimum habitat. The book showcases 107 species in their habitats with color photographs and a short descriptive account of how to know the bird and care for its habitat. Three additional chapters on predator control, deer management, and cedar management offer detailed information on these special issues that impact the presence of birds throughout the region.

By helping readers recognize and evaluate habitat health and then use appropriate habitat enhancement practices, the authors hope to inspire and enable widespread and effective bird conservation in the Texas Hill Country.

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