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Southeast Asia Program, Cornell University

Website: http://seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/

SEAP is designated as a NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER (NRC) by the United States Department of Education 2010 – 2014. As such, the Program is nationally prominent in promoting advanced foreign language training, area and international knowledge in the liberal arts and applied discipline focused on Southeast Asia. SEAP successfully trains undergraduate and graduate students who distinguish themselves in universities, area study centers, businesses, banks, foundations, governments and multinational agencies both in the US and abroad. It offers outreach to regional K-12 and Post-secondary schools/teachers and is known for its academic publications focused on the region.


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Southeast Asia Program, Cornell University

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Cambodia's Second Kingdom

Nation, Imagination, and Democracy

by Astrid Norén-Nilsson

The legal history of Southeast Asia has languished because few texts are accessible in translation. The Three Seals Code is a collection of Thai legal manuscripts surviving from the Ayutthaya era. The Palace Law, probably dating to the late-fifteenth century, was the principal law on kingship and government. The Thammasat, a descendant of India’s dharmaśāstra, stood at the head of the Code and gave it authority. Here these two key laws are presented in English translation for the first time along with detailed annotations and analyses of their content.

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The Land of Gold

Post-Conflict Recovery and Cultural Revival in Independent Timor-Leste

by Judith Bovensiepen

In the village of Funar, located in the central highlands of Timor-Leste, the disturbing events of the twenty-four-year-long Indonesian occupation are rarely articulated in narratives of suffering. Instead, the highlanders emphasize the significance of their return to the sacred land of the ancestors, a place where “gold” is abundant and life is thought to originate. To recover from the forced dislocation the highlanders experienced under the Indonesian occupation, they seek to reestablish a mythical, primordial unity with the land by reinvigorating ancestral practices.

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A Sarong for Clio

Essays on the Intellectual and Cultural History of Thailand--Inspired by Craig Reynolds

edited by Maurizio Peleggi

A Sarong for Clio testifies to an ongoing intellectual dialogue between its ten contributors and Craig J. Reynolds, who inspired these essays. Conceived as a tribute to an innovative scholar, dedicated teacher, and generous colleague, it is this volume's ambition to make a concerted intervention on Thai historiography—and Thai studies more generally—by pursuing in new directions ideas that figure prominently in Reynolds's scholarship. The writings gathered here revolve around two prominent themes in Reynolds's scholarship: the nexus of historiography and power, and Thai political and business cultures—often so intertwined as to be difficult to separate. The chapters examine different types of historical texts, Thai political discourse and political culture, and the media production of consumer culture. Contributors: Chris Baker; Patrick Jory, University of Queensland, Brisbane; Tamara Loos, Cornell University; Yoshinori Nishizaki, National University of Singapore; James Ockey, University of Canterbury; Maurizio Peleggi, National University of Singapore; Pasuk Phongpaichit, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok; Kasian Tejapir, Thammasat University, Bangkok; Villa Vilaithong, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok; Thongchai Winichakul, University of Wisconsin–Madison

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Voices from the Second Republic of South Vietnam (1967-1975)

edited by K.W. Taylor

The Republic of (South) Vietnam is commonly viewed as a unified entity throughout the two decades (1955–75) during which the United States was its main ally. However, domestic politics during that time followed a dynamic trajectory from authoritarianism to chaos to a relatively stable experiment in parliamentary democracy. The stereotype of South Vietnam that appears in most writings, both academic and popular, focuses on the first two periods to portray a caricature of a corrupt, unstable dictatorship and ignores what was achieved during the last eight years. The essays in Voices from the Second Republic of South Vietnam (1967–1975) come from those who strove to build a constitutional structure of representative government during a war for survival with a totalitarian state. Those committed to realizing a noncommunist Vietnamese future placed their hopes in the Second Republic, fought for it, and worked for its success. This book is a step in making their stories known.

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Southeast Asia Program, Cornell University

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