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California Cuisine and Just Food

Sally K. Fairfax, Louise Nelson Dyble, Greig Tor Guthey, Lauren Gwin, Monica Moore, and Jennifer Sokolove

An account of the shift in focus to access and fairness among San Francisco Bay Area alternative food activists and advocates.

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Cannabinoids and the Brain

Linda A. Parker

The cannabis plant has been used for recreational and medicinal purposes for more than 4,000 years, but the scientific investigation into its effects has only recently yielded useful results. In this book, Linda Parker offers a review of the scientific evidence on the effects of cannabinoids on brain and behavioral functioning, with an emphasis on potential therapeutic uses. Parker describes the discovery of tetrahydocannbinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of cannabis, and the further discovery of cannabinoid receptors in the brain. She explains that the brain produces chemicals similar to THC, which act on the same receptors as THC, and shows that the endocannabinoid system is involved in all aspects of brain functioning. Parker reports that cannabis contains not only the psychoactive compound THC, but also other compounds of potential therapeutic benefit, and that one of them, cannabidiol (CBD), shows promise for the treatment of pain, anxiety, and epilepsy. Parker reviews the evidence on cannabinoids and anxiety, depression, mood, sleep, schizophrenia, learning and memory, addiction, sex, appetite and obesity, chemotherapy-induced nausea, epilepsy, and such neurodegenerative disorders as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease. Each chapter also links the scientific evidence to historical and anecdotal reports of the medicinal use of cannabis. As debate about the medical use of marijuana continues, Parker's balanced and objective review of the fundamental science and potential therapeutic effects of cannabis is especially timely.

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Car Crashes without Cars

Lessons about Simulation Technology and Organizational Change from Automotive Design

Paul M. Leonardi

A novel theory of organizational and technological change, illustrated by an account of the development and implementation of a computer-based simulation technology.

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Carnal Resonance

Affect and Online Pornography

Susanna Paasonen

An exploration of the modalities, affective intensities, and disturbing qualitites of online pornography.

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Carving Nature at Its Joints

Natural Kinds in Metaphysics and Science

Edited by Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke, and Matthew H. Slater

Reflections on the metaphysics and epistemology of classification from a distinguished group of philosophers.

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A Case for Climate Engineering

David Keith

Climate engineering -- which could slow the pace of global warming by injecting reflective particles into the upper atmosphere -- has emerged in recent years as an extremely controversial technology. And for good reason: it carries unknown risks and it may undermine commitments to conserving energy. Some critics also view it as an immoral human breach of the natural world. The latter objection, David Keith argues in <I>A Scientist's Case for Climate Engineering</I>, is groundless; we have been using technology to alter our environment for years. But he agrees that there are large issues at stake. A leading scientist long concerned about climate change, Keith offers no naïve proposal for an easy fix to what is perhaps the most challenging question of our time; climate engineering is no silver bullet. But he argues that after decades during which very little progress has been made in reducing carbon emissions we must put this technology on the table and consider it responsibly. That doesn't mean we will deploy it, and it doesn't mean that we can abandon efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But we must understand fully what research needs to be done and how the technology might be designed and used. This book provides a clear and accessible overview of what the costs and risks might be, and how climate engineering might fit into a larger program for managing climate change.

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Causing Human Actions

New Perspectives on the Causal Theory of Action

Edited by Jesús H. Aguilar and Andrei A. Buckareff

Leading figures working in the philosophy of action debate foundational issues relating to the causal theory of action.

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Changing Lanes

Visions and Histories of Urban Freeways

Joseph F.C. DiMento and Cliff Ellis

The story of the evolution of the urban freeway, the competing visions that informed it, and the emerging alternatives for more sustainable urban transportation.

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Chaos and Organization in Health Care

Thomas H. Lee, M.D. and James J. Mongan, M.D.

Two leading physicians’ prescription for solving our health care problems: organizing the fragmented system that delivers care.

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Chasing Men on Fire

The Story of the Search for a Pain Gene

Stephen G. Waxman

Two soldiers, both with wounds injuring the same nerve, show very different responses: one is disabled by neuropathic pain, unable to touch the injured limb because even the lightest contact triggers excruciating discomfort; the other notices numbness but no pain at all. Could the difference lie in their genes? In this book, described in the foreword by Nobel Laureate James Rothman as "so well written that it reads like a detective novel," Stephen Waxman recounts the search for a gene that controls pain -- a search spanning more than thirty years and three continents.  The story moves from genes to pain-signaling neurons that scream when they should be silent to people with a rare genetic disorder who feel they are on fire. Waxman explains that if pain-signaling neurons are injured by trauma or disease, they can become hyperactive and send pain signals to the brain even without external stimulus. Studying the hyperactive mutant pain gene in man on fire syndrome has pointed the way to molecules that produce pain more broadly within the general population, in the rest of us. Waxman's account of the many steps that led to discovery of the pain gene tells the story behind the science, of how science happens.

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