Browse Results For:

Lawrence & Wishart

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 NEXT next

Results 21-30 of 127

:
:
restricted access This search result is for a Book

Education and the Social Order

1940-1990

Brian Simon

Education and the Social Order examines the changes and developments in the British education system from the Second World War to the eve of the millennium.Education has always been a battlefield and never more so than in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century. Simon argues that educational policy usually reflects the outcome of a struggle between progressives who see reform as a first step towards social change, and conservatives who prefer a stratified system which reflects existing social divisions. Beginning with the 1944 Education Act, the book documents the changes that took place as the result of these battles: it begins with the 1944 Education Act and the massive extension of educational opportunity that took place in the postwar period; it then deals with the subsequent prolonged debates about comprehensive education, and other measures of liberalisation during the 1960s and 1970s; and it ends with the years of Conservative government, the 1980s and 1990s, when systematic attempts were made to reverse the advances that had been made during the earlier period.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Expecting the Earth

Life, Culture, Biosemiotics

by Wendy Wheeler

Wendy Wheeler formulates a history and theory of biosemiotic and proto-biosemiotic thinking in order to open up new possibilities of contemporary social, philosophical, aesthetic and technological engagement. This is essential reading for those interested in these groundbreaking new developments, and is relevant to the environmental humanities, social ecology and the life sciences more generally. Expecting the Earth draws on the semiotic philosophy of the American scientist and logician Charles Sanders Peirce, the semiotic ethology of Jakob von Uexküll’s Umwelt Theory, Gregory Bateson’s cybernetic ecology of mind, Jesper Hoffmeyer’s development of biosemiotics, and briefly upon philosophical precursors such as Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari and Gilbert Simondon, as well as the growth of ecological developmental biology more widely. It argues that the age of gene-centrism and mechanism is slowly passing. In its place, the biological sciences increasingly recognise that life isn’t simply a genetically determined programme but is centrally a matter of information and communication systems nested in larger communicative systems. The latter include both internal and external, and natural and cultural, environments. But ‘information’ is an under-unanalysed term in relation to living systems. Accordingly, a new interdiscipline, biosemiotics, has grown up to study the ontology of sign relations in biological, aesthetic and technological ecologies. From the Greek bios for life and semeion for sign, biosemiotics is the study of these intertwined natural and cultural sign systems of the living.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Fedor Il'ich Dan

A Menshevik Leader in Lenin's Russia

translated by Francis King

This is the first translation into any language of Fedor (Theodore) Dan’s Dva goda skitaniy [Two Years of Wandering], written in early 1922, and published in Russian in Berlin later that year. It is a remarkable portrayal of Soviet Russia during and after the civil war, as seen by one of the most senior social-democratic Menshevik leaders in Russia at that time. Dan’s memoir is not the account of a politically disinterested witness. He had been active in the Russian revolutionary movement since 1894, and had been a consistent critic of Lenin and his supporters in Russian Marxist politics for almost two decades. The memoir was written not for posterity, but first and foremost as a political intervention. But this does not detract from its value as a source on this period of early Soviet history, for several reasons. First, it is very immediate. Shortly after his expulsion from Russia at the end of January 1922, Dan started writing the memoir, and by June of that year he was already correcting the proofs. Second, although it seems to have been written without notes, it is generally very accurate. Where it has been possible to check Dan’s recollections against other accounts or archival documents, they tally, despite occasional minor errors of detail. Third – a related point – it seems to be a generally honest memoir.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Female Fetishism

A New Look

by Lorraine Gammon and Merja Makinen

The Freudian construction of a passive female sexuality has been severely criticised by feminists. This book tackles the question of female fetishism and documents women's engagement with this form of sexuality. Most psychoanalytic theory excludes the very possibility of the existence of female fetishism. In the face of the wealth of material about fetishistic practices gathered in this book, the authors suggest that Freudian phallocentrism has prevented analysts from seeing the evidence before their eyes.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

First New Left, The

Edited by Michael Kenny

In the late 1950s Stuart Hall, Edward Thompson and Raymond Williams, among others, came together as part of a promising new political formulation, the New Left. The six years of the group's formal existence represents one of the richest and most exciting periods in the intellectual history of the left in Britain. This short period saw the beginning of many future theoretical developments in radical politics, and the founder members of the New Left are now associated with ground-breaking work in history, culture and politics. Michael Kenny documents and analyses the debates of the New Left, showing how their preoccupations prefigure many contemporary concerns: the broadening of the previously narrow definition of politics, an engagement with popular culture, the exploration of a Gramscian politics, and the attempt to open a 'third space' between a defunct Marxism-Leninism and an intellectually barren labourist tradition.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

From Serrfdom to Socialism

by Keir Hardie with introduction by John Callow

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Further Selections from Prison Notebooks

Translated and edited by Derek Boothman

Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks, written between 1929 and 1935, are the work of one of the outstanding and most original thinkers in Western Europe. With meticulous scholarship, Derek Boothman has made available an invaluable selection of Gramsci's work. This volume brings together Gramsci's writings on religion, education, science, philosophy, and economic theory. The theme that links these writings is the investigation of ideology at its different levels, and the structures that embody and reproduce it. Concepts such as subalternity and corporate consciousness, hegemony and the building of a counter hegemony, recur throughout the book. Further Selections from the Prison Notebooks is an important addition to the corpus of work available to English-speaking scholars of Gramsci, useful to a wide audience of both scholars and public intellectuals, including historians, philosophers, political scientists, literary theorists, and critics.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Gramsci's Political Thought

by Roger Simon; Introduction by Stuart Hall

Antonio Gramsci was the twentieth century’s most original and wide-ranging Marxist thinker. His writing, particularly the Prison Notebooks, has been hugely influential on left thinking. The flexibility of his approach has helped to rescue Marxist thinking from the determinism and economic reductionism to which it has sometimes been reduced and his creative use of terms such as hegemony, civil society and historic block has added a new dimension to political vocabulary. The fragmentary nature of the Gramsci’s notebooks has meant it has not always been easy to grasp the significance of his ideas. This book, with an introductory essay by Stuart Hall, provides an account of Gramsci’s work which makes his writing accessible and comprehensible for everyone.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Gramsci's Political Thought

An Introduction

by Roger Simon

Antonio Gramsci was an innovative and wide-ranging thinker whose interpretations of Marxism helped rescue it from determinism and economic reductionism. In the words of Stuart Hall: ‘Reading Gramsci has fertilised our political imagination, transformed our way of thinking, our style of thought, our whole political project’. Gramsci’s creative use of terms such as hegemony, civil society and historic block adds a new dimension to political vocabulary. But the fragmentary nature of his writings, especially in the Prison Notebooks, means that it is not always easy to grasp the full significance of his ideas. This book, completely revised in 1991 and further revised in 2015, provides an account of Gramsci’s work which makes his writing accessible and comprehensible for the contemporary reader

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Great and Terrible World, A

The Pre-Prison Letters 1908-1926 Antonio Gramsci

Edited and translated by Derek Boothman

This edition of letters by Antonio Gramsci vividly evokes the ‘great and terrible world’ in which he lived (a description he used a number of times in his correspondence). The letters show Gramsci beginning to form the theoretical concepts that come to fuller fruition in the Prison Notebooks, but they also give an essential and rounded picture of Gramsci’s development - politically, intellectually and emotionally. Broadly speaking, the letters are of three types: early letters to Gramsci’s family; overtly political letters from Turin, Moscow, Vienna, and Rome; and letters to the Schucht sisters, including Jul’ka, whom he married while in Moscow. The political letters constitute a fascinating insight into the period, both with regard to the Communist International and, more often, to Italian politics. The letters to his wife give a poignant insight into his emotional life. The volume also includes the famous letter of 1926 in which Gramsci, writing in the name of the Italian Party’s Political Bureau, criticises the Central Committee of the Soviet Communist Party for their handling of internal opposition. There are approximately 200 letters in this volume, including some that have been recently discovered and published for the first time in this volume. The collection begins with the letters that the young Gramsci sent back to his family when he was a student in Cagliari and ends with the last letter he wrote before his arrest in 1926.

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 NEXT next

Results 21-30 of 127

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Publishers

Lawrence & Wishart

Content Type

  • (125)
  • (2)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access