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Bayesian Field Theory

Jörg C. Lemm

Ask a traditional mathematician the likely outcome of a coin-toss, and he will reply that no evidence exists on which to base such a prediction. Ask a Bayesian, and he will examine the coin, conclude that it was probably not tampered with, and predict five hundred heads in a thousand tosses; a subsequent experiment would then be used to refine this prediction. The Bayesian approach, in other words, permits the use of prior knowledge when testing a hypothesis. Long the province of mathematicians and statisticians, Bayesian methods are applied in this ground-breaking book to problems in cutting-edge physics. Joerg Lemm offers practical examples of Bayesian analysis for the physicist working in such areas as neural networks, artificial intelligence, and inverse problems in quantum theory. The book also includes nonparametric density estimation problems, including, as special cases, nonparametric regression and pattern recognition. Thought-provoking and sure to be controversial, Bayesian Field Theory will be of interest to physicists as well as to other specialists in the rapidly growing number of fields that make use of Bayesian methods.

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Beaked Whales

A Complete Guide to Their Biology and Conservation

Richard Ellis and James G. Mead

Beaked whales are a group that has been shrouded in mystery for most of the twentieth century. A few species were known to science only because a partial skeleton happened to wash up on a remote shore. Over the past few decades, however, scientists have gained a better understanding of this distinct group of cetaceans, gathering natural history information on twenty-two beaked whale species. In this book, famed artist and naturalist Richard Ellis and leading beaked whale researcher James G. Mead bring these unknown marine mammals into the limelight.

Beaked whales are long-lived cetaceans, with some living well past 70 years. They dive to great depths in search of prey, which they capture by expanding their oral cavity suddenly, causing a drop in pressure that sucks in the squid or fish they are hunting. The bodies of most males are covered with tooth-mark scars—possibly marks of mating battles. Because many species are only somewhat larger than dolphins, they are often confused with porpoises, although some larger beaked whale species may grow to 40 feet. These creatures need our help. Beaked whales have been a hot topic in conservation circles of late because their numbers are declining, perhaps due to the damaging effects of naval sonar on their auditory systems.

In Ellis and Mead’s book, the beaked whales finally get their due. The duo provides a combination of fascinating stories about the species, original Richard Ellis art, and photos from leading natural history photographers. The result is an accessible, beautiful book—the first of its kind on this unusual group of whales. Meet the beaked whales, and enjoy the fascinating and mysterious world in which they live.

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Becoming a Wildlife Professional

edited by Scott E. Henke and Paul R. Krausman

Working with wildlife can be a thrilling adventure steeped in the wonders of the natural world, but entering the field demands a strong personal commitment. With proper training and guidance, students can transform themselves into competitive applicants and forge successful careers. This book reveals the best way to become a wildlife management professional.

Becoming a Wildlife Professional is the first comprehensive book to describe the entry-level jobs available for the next generation of wildlife biologists and conservationists. Scott E. Henke and Paul R. Krausman include detailed chapters on how students should prepare for a vocation in the wildlife profession while offering pragmatic advice about applying for and obtaining a job. The core of the book presents over 100 diverse career options that are available to aspiring wildlife workers, including work in biological field research, forestry, rehabilitation, ranching, photography, and refuge management. It also details each position’s educational and technical requirements, challenges, salaries, and opportunities for advancement.

Bringing together useful advice from a range of seasoned experts who actually hold these jobs and have used these techniques to secure employment, Becoming a Wildlife Professional conveys important philosophical messages about the responsibilities and challenges of a career in wildlife conservation and management. This how-to manual is an essential text for wildlife science students interested in making themselves marketable for employers across a wide spectrum of wildlife jobs.

Chapter Author Contributors: Rick Baydack, Jessica L. Blickley, Monika Burchette, Shawn Cleveland, Kristy Deiner, Kelly Garbach, Ashley R. Gramza, Jim Heffelfinger, Scott E. Henke, Fidel Hernández, Serra J. Hoagland, Jessica A. Homyack, Winifred B. Kessler, Holley Kline, Lianne Koczur, Michel T. Kohl, John L. Koprowski, Blaise Korzekwa, Paul R. Krausman, Iara Lacher, Mariah H. Meek, Kelly F. Millenbah, Karen E. Munroe, Kerry L. Nicholson, John P. O’Loughlin, Lindsey Phillips, Lauren M. Porensky, William F. Porter, Terra Rentz, Nova J. Silvy, Kelley M. Stewart, Marit L. Wilkerson, Eric Winford. An additional 52 wildlife professionals describe the work of the profession.

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Becoming Criminal

Transversal Performance and Cultural Dissidence in Early Modern England

Bryan Reynolds

In this book Bryan Reynolds argues that early modern England experienced a sociocultural phenomenon, unprecedented in English history, which has been largely overlooked by historians and critics. Beginning in the 1520s, a distinct "criminal culture" of beggars, vagabonds, confidence tricksters, prostitutes, and gypsies emerged and flourished. This community defined itself through its criminal conduct and dissident thought and was, in turn,officially defined by and against the dominant conceptions of English cultural normality. Examining plays, popular pamphlets, laws, poems, and scholarly work from the period, Reynolds demonstrates that this criminal culture, though diverse, was united by its own ideology, language, and aesthetic. Using his transversal theory, he shows how the enduring presence of this criminal culture markedly influenced the mainstream culture's aesthetic sensibilities, socioeconomic organization, and systems of belief. He maps the effects of the public theater's transformative force of transversality, such as through the criminality represented by Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, and Dekker, on both Elizabethan and Jacobean society and the scholarship devoted to it.

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Becoming Neapolitan

Citizen Culture in Baroque Naples

John A. Marino

Naples in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries managed to maintain a distinct social character while under Spanish rule. John A. Marino's study explores how the population of the city of Naples constructed their identity in the face of Spanish domination. As Western Europe’s largest city, early modern Naples was a world unto itself. Its politics were decentralized and its neighborhoods diverse. Clergy, nobles, and commoners struggled to assert political and cultural power. Looking at these three groups, Marino unravels their complex interplay to show how such civic rituals as parades and festival days fostered a unified Neapolitan identity through the assimilation of Aragonese customs, Burgundian models, and Spanish governance. He discusses why the relationship between mythical and religious representations in ritual practices allowed Naples's inhabitants to identify themselves as citizens of an illustrious and powerful sovereignty and explains how this semblance of stability and harmony hid the city's political, cultural, and social fissures. In the process, Marino finds that being and becoming Neapolitan meant manipulating the city's rituals until their original content and meaning were lost. The consequent widening of divisions between rich and poor led Naples's vying castes to turn on one another as the Spanish monarchy weakened. Rich in source material and tightly integrated, this nuanced, synthetic overview of the disciplining of ritual life in early modern Naples digs deep into the construction of Neapolitan identity. Scholars of early modern Italy and of Italian and European history in general will find much to ponder in Marino's keen insights and compelling arguments.

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Before and After Cancer Treatment

Heal Faster, Better, Stronger

Julie K. Silver, MD

A twelve-year cancer survivor and oncology rehabilitation specialist, Dr. Julie K. Silver wrote After Cancer Treatment to help others recover from the exhaustion and physical devastation that often follow treatment. This new edition of the book, retitled Before and After Cancer Treatment, describes improved therapies, better delivery of care, holistic care options, and energetics. In covering the benefits of prehabilitation strategies, which improve physical and emotional strength before beginning therapy, the book adds another dimension to the experience of cancer treatment. Dr. Silver fills this survivor-oriented book with exercise and diet recommendations as well as step-by-step instructions for fighting fatigue, monitoring mood, and overcoming setbacks. Readers are encouraged to set balanced goals, take time to heal, and consult both conventional and alternative medicine. Most people will live for many years after their initial cancer diagnosis—often cured or in remission. Some will live with cancer as a chronic condition. The goal is always to live life to the fullest, which means feeling as strong as possible—physically and emotionally. Dr. Silver recommends daring to dream again and preparing for the future. Wherever they are in their own journey with cancer, readers will find here a personal, practical, and powerful guide to recovery.

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Before the Oath

How George W. Bush and Barack Obama Managed a Transfer of Power

Martha Joynt Kumar

It’s one of the hallmarks of American democracy: on inauguration day, the departing president heeds the will of the people and hands the keys to power to a successor. The transition from one administration to the next sounds simple, even ceremonial. But in 2009, as President George W. Bush briefed President-elect Barack Obama about the ongoing wars and plummeting economy he’d soon inherit, the Bush team revealed that they were grappling with a late-breaking threat to the presidency: U.S. intelligence sources believed that a terror group with links to Al Qaeda planned to attack the National Mall during the inaugural festivities. Although this violence never materialized, its possibility made it clear that well-laid contingency plans were essential. Political scientist Martha Joynt Kumar uncovered this secret peril while interviewing senior Bush and Obama advisers for her latest book. In Before the Oath, Kumar documents how two presidential teams—one outgoing, the other incoming—must forge trusting alliances in order to help the new president succeed in his or her first term. Kumar enjoyed unprecedented access to several incumbent and candidate transition team members, and she combines in-depth scholarship with one-on-one interviews to put readers squarely behind the scenes. Using the Bush-Obama handoff as a lens through which to examine the presidential transition process, Kumar interweaves examples from previous administrations as far back as Truman-Eisenhower. Her subjects describe in vivid detail the challenges of sowing campaign ideals across a sprawling executive branch as Congress, the media, and external events press in. Kumar’s lively account of lessons learned and pitfalls encountered during past presidential transitions provides an essential road map for presidential aspirants and their advisers, as well as campaign workers, federal employees, and political appointees.

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Being American in Europe, 1750–1860

Daniel Kilbride

While visiting Europe In 1844, Harry McCall of Philadelphia wrote to his cousin back home of his disappointment. He didn’t mind Paris, but he preferred the company of Americans to Parisians. Furthermore, he vowed to be “an American, heart and soul” wherever he traveled, but “particularly in England.” Why was he in Europe if he found it so distasteful? After all, travel in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries was expensive, time consuming, and frequently uncomfortable. Being American in Europe, 1750–1860 tracks the adventures of American travelers while exploring large questions about how these experiences affected national identity. Daniel Kilbride searched the diaries, letters, published accounts, and guidebooks written between the late colonial period and the Civil War. His sources are written by people who, while prominent in their own time, are largely obscure today, making this account fresh and unusual. Exposure to the Old World generated varied and contradictory concepts of American nationality. Travelers often had diverse perspectives because of their region of origin, race, gender, and class. Americans in Europe struggled with the tension between defining the United States as a distinct civilization and situating it within a wider world. Kilbride describes how these travelers defined themselves while they observed the politics, economy, morals, manners, and customs of Europeans. He locates an increasingly articulate and refined sense of simplicity and virtue among these visitors and a gradual disappearance of their feelings of awe and inferiority.

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Being Cool

The Work of Elmore Leonard

Charles J. Rzepka

Widely known as the crime fiction writer whose work led to the movies Get Shorty and Out of Sight, Elmore Leonard has a special knack for creating cool characters, which for him means characters who are good at what they do. The dope dealers, bookies, grifters, financial advisers, talent agents, shady attorneys, hookers, models, and crooked cops of Leonard's world may be nefarious, but they are generally confident, skilled, and composed, and they cope without effort or thought. In Being Cool, Charles Rzepka draws on more than twelve hours of personal interviews with Leonard and applies what he learned to his close analysis of Leonard's long life and prodigious output: 45 published novels, 39 published and unpublished short stories, and numerous essays written over the course of six decades. Leonard's writing methods and style epitomize how he conceives "being cool." Rzepka delineates the stages and patterns that characterize the author's creative evolution. Like jazz greats, Leonard forged an individual style immediately recognizable for its voice and rhythm, including his characters' rat-a-tat recitations, curt backhands, and ragged trains of thought. Taking being cool as the highway through Leonard's life and works, Rzepka finds plenty of byways to explore along the way.

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The Bestiary, or Procession of Orpheus

Guillaume Apollinaire translated, with an essay, by X. J. Kennedy woodcuts by Raoul Dufy

Guillaume Apollinaire’s first book of poems has charmed readers with its brief celebrations of animals, birds, fish, insects, and the mythical poet Orpheus since it was first published in 1911. Though Apollinaire would go on to longer and more ambitious work, his Bestiary reveals key elements of his later poetry, among them surprising images, wit, formal mastery, and wry irony. X. J. Kennedy’s fresh translation follows Apollinaire in casting the poems into rhymed stanzas, suggesting music and sudden closures while remaining faithful to their sense. Kennedy provides the English alongside the original French, inviting readers to compare the two and appreciate the fidelity of the former to the latter. He includes a critical and historical essay that relates the Bestiary to its sources in medieval “creature books,” provides a brief biography and summation of the troubled circumstances surrounding the book’s initial publication, and places the poems in the context of Apollinaire’s work as a poet and as a champion of avant garde art. This short introduction to the work of an essentially modern writer includes four curious poems apparently suppressed from the first edition and reprints of the Raoul Dufy woodcuts published in the 1911 edition.

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