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The Lettered Mountain

A Peruvian Village’s Way with Writing

Frank Salomon and Mercedes Niño-Murcia

Andean peoples joined the world of alphabetic literacy nearly 500 years ago, yet the history of their literacy has remained hidden until now. In The Lettered Mountain, Frank Salomon and Mercedes Niño-Murcia expand notions of literacy and challenge stereotypes of Andean “orality” by analyzing the writings of mountain villagers from Inka times to the Internet era. Their historical ethnography is based on extensive research in the village of Tupicocha, in the central Peruvian province of Huarochirí. The region has a special place in the history of Latin American letters as the home of the unique early-seventeenth-century Quechua-language book explaining Peru’s ancient gods and priesthoods. Granted access to Tupicocha’s surprisingly rich internal archives, Salomon and Niño-Murcia found that legacy reflected in a distinctive version of lettered life developed prior to the arrival of state schools. In their detailed ethnography, writing emerges as a vital practice underlying specifically Andean sacred culture and self-governance. At the same time, the authors find that Andean relations with the nation-state have been disadvantaged by state writing standards developed in dialogue with European academies but not with the rural literate tradition.

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Long Live Atahualpa

Indigenous Politics, Justice, and Democracy in the Northern Andes

Emma Cervone

Long Live Atahualpa is an innovative ethnography examining indigenous political mobilization in the struggle against discrimination in modern Ecuador. Emma Cervone explores the politicization of Indianness—the right of indigenous peoples to self-determination and political participation—through an analysis of Quichua mobilization in the central Andean province of Chimborazo, Ecuador. That mobilization led to the formation of grassroots organizations, such as the Inca Atahualpa. Cervone’s account of the region’s social history since the formation of a rural unionist movement in the 1950s illuminates the complex process that led indigenous activists to forge new alliances with the Catholic Church, NGOs, and regional indigenous organizations. She describes how the Inca Atahualpa contested racial subordination by intervening in matters of resource distribution, justice, and cultural politics. Considering local indigenous politics in relation to indigenous mobilization at the national and the international levels, Cervone discusses how state-led modernization, which began in the 1960s, created political openings by generating new economic formations and social categories. Long Live Atahualpa sheds new light on indigenous peoples operating at the crossroads of global capitalism and neoliberal reforms as they redefine historically rooted relationships of subordination.

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Making a New World

Founding Capitalism in the Bajío and Spanish North America

By John Tutino

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Making Samba

A New History of Race and Music in Brazil

by Marc A. Hertzman

In November 1916, a young Afro-Brazilian musician named Donga registered sheet music for the song "Pelo telefone" ("On the Telephone") at the National Library in Rio de Janeiro. This apparently simple act—claiming ownership of a musical composition—set in motion a series of events that would shake Brazil's cultural landscape. Before the debut of "Pelo telephone," samba was a somewhat obscure term, but by the late 1920s, the wildly popular song had helped to make it synonymous with Brazilian national music.

The success of "Pelo telephone" embroiled Donga in controversy. A group of musicians claimed that he had stolen their work, and a prominent journalist accused him of selling out his people in pursuit of profit and fame. Within this single episode are many of the concerns that animate Making Samba, including intellectual property claims, the Brazilian state, popular music, race, gender, national identity, and the history of Afro-Brazilians in Rio de Janeiro. By tracing the careers of Rio's pioneering black musicians from the late nineteenth century until the 1970s, Marc A. Hertzman revises the histories of samba and of Brazilian national culture.

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Mediterranean Quarterly

Vol. 10, no. 3 (1999); Vol. 11 (2000) through current issue

As the only journal that specifically addresses the problems of the Mediterranean region, the Mediterranean Quarterly is in a position to account for many of the crucial developments in international politics and policy that are redefining the world order. This unique publication delivers global issues with a Mediterranean slant and regional struggles of global impact. In the Mediterranean Quarterly, important voices from around the world speak with clarity and depth about the effects of history, culture, politics, and economics on the Mediterranean and the world.

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Minnesota Review

No. 1 (1973)-no. 62 (2004), missing nos. 2,3,9,39-44,50-51,55-57,63-74; No. 75 (2010) through current issue

Publishing contemporary poetry and fiction as well as reviews, critical commentary, and interviews of leading intellectual figures, the minnesota review curates smart yet accessible collections of progressive new work. This eclectic survey provides lively and sophisticated signposts to navigating current critical discourse. Under the leadership of new editor Janell Watson, the review will maintain its tradition of exploring the most exciting literary and critical developments for both specialists and a general audience.

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MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly

Vol. 60, no. 2 (1999); Vol. 61 (2000) - vol. 65 (2004)

The focus of MLQ is on change, both in literary practice and within the profession of literature itself. MLQ is open to papers on literary change from the Middle Ages to the present and welcomes theoretical reflections on the relationship of literary change or historicism to feminism, ethnic studies, cultural materialism, discourse analysis, and all other forms of representation and cultural critique. Seeing texts as the depictions, agents, and vehicles of change, MLQ targets literature as a commanding and vital force.

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Nepantla: Views from South

Vol. 1 (2000) - vol. 4 (2003)

Nepantla: Views from South is committed to fostering innovative reflection at the intersections of the humanities and the social sciences and of post-area studies and cultural studies. While inspired mainly by Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latinidad perspectives, Nepantla's scope is in no way limited to these perspectives and/or regions. The linkages that define borders of all kinds serve as points of departure for exploration: borders of empire; borders of class, gender, and ethnicity; and the disciplinary borders that have traditionally defined scholarship.

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Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art

Vol. 1 (1994) through current issue

Nka focuses on publishing critical work that examines the newly developing field of contemporary African and African Diaspora art within the modernist and postmodernist experience and therefore contributes significantly to the intellectual dialogue on world art and the discourse on internationalism and multiculturalism in the arts. Nka mainly includes scholarly articles, reviews (exhibits and books), interviews, and roundtable discussions.

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Patients of the State

The Politics of Waiting in Argentina

Javier Auyero

Patients of the State is a sociological account of the extended waiting that poor people seeking state social and administrative services must endure. It is based on ethnographic research in the waiting area of the main welfare office in Buenos Aires, in the line leading into the Argentine registration office where legal aliens apply for identification cards, and among people who live in a polluted shantytown on the capital’s outskirts, while waiting to be allocated better housing. Scrutinizing the mundane interactions between the poor and the state, as well as underprivileged people’s confusion and uncertainty about the administrative processes that affect them, Javier Auyero argues that while waiting, the poor learn the opposite of citizenship. They learn to be patients of the state. They absorb the message that they should be patient and keep waiting, because there is nothing else that they can do. Drawing attention to a significant everyday dynamic that has received little scholarly attention until now, Auyero considers not only how the poor experience these lengthy waits but also how making poor people wait works as a strategy of state control.

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