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Duke University Press

Duke University Press

Website: http://www.dukeupress.edu

Duke University Press offers more than forty journals that span a stimulating range of disciplines in mathematics, the humanities, and the social sciences, from East Asian cultural studies to French history, from lesbian and gay studies to the history of economic thought, from African literature and politics to medieval and early modern studies. Duke University Press has a strong reputation in the interdisciplinary area of theory and history of cultural production and is known as a publisher willing to take chances on nontraditional publications.


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Duke University Press

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Results 51-60 of 65

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Public Culture

Vol. 11, no. 2 (1999); Vol. 12 (2000) - vol. 16 (2004)

For fifteen years Public Culture has been publishing field-defining ethnographies and analyses of cultural studies. Public Culture essays have mapped the capital, human, and media flows drawing cities, peoples, and states into transnational relationships and political economies. Anthropologists, historians, sociologists, artists, and scholars of politics, literatures, architecture, and the arts have made groundbreaking contributions in the pages of Public Culture.

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Radical History Review

Issue 79 (2001) - Issue 90 (2004)

For more than a quarter of a century, Radical History Review has stood at the point where rigorous historical scholarship and active political engagement converge. The journal is edited by a collective of historians--men and women with diverse backgrounds, research interests, and professional perspectives. Articles in RHR address issues of gender, race, sexuality, imperialism, and class, stretching the boundaries of historical analysis to explore Western and non-Western histories.

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Singing for the Dead

The Politics of Indigenous Revival in Mexico

by Paja Faudree

Singing for the Dead chronicles ethnic revival in Oaxaca, Mexico, where new forms of singing and writing in the local Mazatec indigenous language are producing powerful, transformative political effects. Paja Faudree argues for the inclusion of singing as a necessary component in the polarized debates about indigenous orality and literacy, and she considers how the coupling of literacy and song has allowed people from the region to create texts of enduring social resonance. She examines how local young people are learning to read and write in Mazatec as a result of the region's new Day of the Dead song contest. Faudree also studies how tourist interest in local psychedelic mushrooms has led to their commodification, producing both opportunities and challenges for songwriters and others who represent Mazatec culture. She situates these revival movements within the contexts of Mexico and Latin America, as well as the broad, hemisphere-wide movement to create indigenous literatures. Singing for the Dead provides a new way to think about the politics of ethnicity, the success of social movements, and the limits of national belonging.

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Small Axe

Vol. 5 (2001) through current issue

Small Axe focuses on the renewal of practices of intellectual criticism. It recognizes a tradition of social, political, and cultural criticism in and about regional/disasporic Caribbean and honors that tradition but also argues with it because it is through such argument that a tradition renews itself.

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Social Text

Vol. 17, no. 3 (1999); Vol. 18 (2000) - vol. 22 (2004)

Social Text covers a broad spectrum of social and cultural phenomena, applying the latest interpretive methods to the world at large. A daring and controversial leader in the field of cultural studies, the journal consistently focuses attention on questions of gender, sexuality, race, and the environment, publishing key works by the most influential social and cultural theorists.

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The South Atlantic Quarterly

Vol. 98, no. 3 (1999) - vol. 103 (2004)

Founded amid controversy in 1901, the South Atlantic Quarterly continues to cover the beat, center and fringe, with bold analyses of the current scene--national, cultural, intellectual--worldwide. Now published exclusively in special issues, this vanguard centenarian journal is tackling embattled states, evaluating postmodernity's influential writers and intellectuals, and examining a wide range of cultural phenomena.

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Speaking of Flowers

Student Movements and the Making and Remembering of 1968 in Military Brazil

by Victoria Langland

Speaking of Flowers is an innovative study of student activism during Brazil's military dictatorship (1964–85) and an examination of the very notion of student activism, which changed dramatically in response to the student protests of 1968. Looking into what made students engage in national political affairs as students, rather than through other means, Victoria Langland traces a gradual, uneven shift in how they constructed, defended, and redefined their right to political participation, from emphasizing class, race, and gender privileges to organizing around other institutional and symbolic forms of political authority.

Embodying Cold War political and gendered tensions, Brazil's increasingly violent military government mounted fierce challenges to student political activity just as students were beginning to see themselves as representing an otherwise demobilized civil society. By challenging the students' political legitimacy at a pivotal moment, the dictatorship helped to ignite the student protests that exploded in 1968. In her attentive exploration of the years after 1968, Langland analyzes what the demonstrations of that year meant to later generations of Brazilian students, revealing how student activists mobilized collective memories in their subsequent political struggles.

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Sustaining Activism

A Brazilian Women’s Movement and a Father-Daughter Collaboration

by Jeffrey W. Rubin and Emma Sokoloff-Rubin

In 1986, a group of young Brazilian women started a movement to secure economic rights for rural women and transform women's roles in their homes and communities. Together with activists across the country, they built a new democracy in the wake of a military dictatorship. In Sustaining Activism, Jeffrey W. Rubin and Emma Sokoloff-Rubin tell the behind-the-scenes story of this remarkable movement. As a father-daughter team, they describe the challenges of ethnographic research and the way their collaboration gave them a unique window into a fiery struggle for equality.

Starting in 2002, Rubin and Sokoloff-Rubin traveled together to southern Brazil, where they interviewed activists over the course of ten years. Their vivid descriptions of women’s lives reveal the hard work of sustaining a social movement in the years after initial victories, when the political way forward was no longer clear and the goal of remaking gender roles proved more difficult than activists had ever imagined. Highlighting the tensions within the movement about how best to effect change, Sustaining Activism ultimately shows that democracies need social movements in order to improve people’s lives and create a more just society.

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Theater

Vol. 29, no. 2 (1999); Vol. 30 (2000) - vol. 34 (2004)

For more than thirty years Theater has been the most informative, serious, and imaginative American journal available to readers interested in contemporary theater. It has been the first publisher of pathbreaking plays from writers as diverse as Athol Fugard, Sarah Kane, W. David Hancock, David Greenspan, Richard Foreman, Rinde Eckert, and Adrienne Kennedy. It has printed writings on theater by dramatists including Heiner Müller, Dario Fo, Mac Wellman, and Suzan-Lori Parks. Its special issues have covered many topics: theater and social change, children's theater, Soviet theater, theater and photography, paratheater, theater and revolution, and theater and the apocalypse.

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Tikkun

Vol. 27 (2012) through current issue

Named after the Jewish concept of mending and transforming a fragmented world, the magazine Tikkun offers analysis and commentary that strive to bridge the cultural divide between religious and secular progressives. By bringing together voices from many disparate religious and secular humanist communities to talk about social transformation, political change, and the evolution of our religious traditions, Tikkun creates space for the emergence of a religious Left to respond to the influence of the religious Right and the distortions of global capitalism, while simultaneously critiquing reductionist views that sometimes prevail in liberal and progressive circles. The magazine, which began as a progressive Jewish publication, provides intellectually rigorous, psychologically sophisticated, and unconventional critiques of politics, spirituality, social theory, and culture and is known for its coverage of the Israel/Palestine conflict, social justice issues, and the environment.

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