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Duke University Press

Duke University Press

Website: http://www.dukeupress.edu

Duke University Press offers more than forty journals that span a stimulating range of disciplines in mathematics, the humanities, and the social sciences, from East Asian cultural studies to French history, from lesbian and gay studies to the history of economic thought, from African literature and politics to medieval and early modern studies. Duke University Press has a strong reputation in the interdisciplinary area of theory and history of cultural production and is known as a publisher willing to take chances on nontraditional publications.


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Duke University Press

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Hopscotch: A Cultural Review

Vol. 1, no. 3 (1999); v. 2 (2000/01)

Hopscotch represents an invitation to look at past and present Hispanic cultures anew, to revisit its multifaceted history and identity by reencountering its diverse roots and heritage-from indigenous peoples to European settlers, from African slaves brought during colonial times to the subsequent waves of immigration from Asia, the Middle East, and Western and Eastern Europe. The journal covers art, literature, cinema, and politics and begins to consider the many faces of Hispanics in the world today.

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Intimate Distance

Andean Music in Japan

Michelle Bigenho

What does it mean to play “someone else’s music”? Intimate Distance delves into this question through a focus on Bolivian musicians who tour Japan playing Andean music and Japanese audiences who often go beyond fandom to take up these musical forms as hobbyists and even as professional musicians. Michelle Bigenho conducted part of her ethnographic research while performing with Bolivian musicians as they toured Japan. Drawing on interviews with Bolivian musicians, as well as Japanese fans and performers of these traditions, Bigenho explores how transcultural intimacy is produced at the site of Andean music and its performances. Bolivians and Japanese involved in these musical practices often express narratives of intimacy and racial belonging that reference shared but unspecified indigenous ancestors. Along with revealing the story of Bolivian music’s route to Japan and interpreting the transnational staging of indigenous worlds, Bigenho examines these stories of closeness, thereby unsettling the East-West binary that often structures many discussions of cultural difference and exotic fantasy.

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Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law

Vol. 24, nos. 4-5 (1999); Vol. 25 (2000) - vol. 29 (2004)

A leading journal in its field, and the primary source of communication across the many disciplines it serves, the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law focuses on the initiation, formulation, and implementation of health policy and analyzes the relations between government and health--past, present, and future.

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Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Vol. 27, no. 1 (1997); Vol. 30 (2000) - vol. 34 (2004)

The Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies publishes articles informed by historical inquiry and alert to issues raised by contemporary theoretical debate. The journal fosters rigorous investigation of historiographical representations of European and western Asian cultural forms from late antiquity to the seventeenth century. Its topics include art, literature, theater, music, philosophy, theology, and history, and it embraces material objects as well as texts; women as well as men; merchants, workers, and audiences as well as patrons; Jews and Muslims as well as Christians.

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Journal of Middle East Women's Studies

Vol. 1 (2005) through current issue

JMEWS (Journal of Middle East Women's Studies) is the official publication of the Association for Middle East Womens Studies and is a benefit of membership. Its purpose is to advance the fields of Middle East women's studies, gender studies, and Middle East studies through contributions across disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. JMEWS, which is published three times a year, publishes research informed by transnational feminist studies, cultural studies, modern historical studies, new forms of ethnography, and the emergent intersections of science and philosophy. JMEWS provides a forum in which area-specific questions can be discussed and debated among authors from the global north and south, through scholarly articles, book and film reviews, and other forms of communication.

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Latinamericanism after 9/11

John Beverley

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The Lettered Mountain

A Peruvian Village’s Way with Writing

Frank Salomon and Mercedes Niño-Murcia

Andean peoples joined the world of alphabetic literacy nearly 500 years ago, yet the history of their literacy has remained hidden until now. In The Lettered Mountain, Frank Salomon and Mercedes Niño-Murcia expand notions of literacy and challenge stereotypes of Andean “orality” by analyzing the writings of mountain villagers from Inka times to the Internet era. Their historical ethnography is based on extensive research in the village of Tupicocha, in the central Peruvian province of Huarochirí. The region has a special place in the history of Latin American letters as the home of the unique early-seventeenth-century Quechua-language book explaining Peru’s ancient gods and priesthoods. Granted access to Tupicocha’s surprisingly rich internal archives, Salomon and Niño-Murcia found that legacy reflected in a distinctive version of lettered life developed prior to the arrival of state schools. In their detailed ethnography, writing emerges as a vital practice underlying specifically Andean sacred culture and self-governance. At the same time, the authors find that Andean relations with the nation-state have been disadvantaged by state writing standards developed in dialogue with European academies but not with the rural literate tradition.

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Long Live Atahualpa

Indigenous Politics, Justice, and Democracy in the Northern Andes

Emma Cervone

Long Live Atahualpa is an innovative ethnography examining indigenous political mobilization in the struggle against discrimination in modern Ecuador. Emma Cervone explores the politicization of Indianness—the right of indigenous peoples to self-determination and political participation—through an analysis of Quichua mobilization in the central Andean province of Chimborazo, Ecuador. That mobilization led to the formation of grassroots organizations, such as the Inca Atahualpa. Cervone’s account of the region’s social history since the formation of a rural unionist movement in the 1950s illuminates the complex process that led indigenous activists to forge new alliances with the Catholic Church, NGOs, and regional indigenous organizations. She describes how the Inca Atahualpa contested racial subordination by intervening in matters of resource distribution, justice, and cultural politics. Considering local indigenous politics in relation to indigenous mobilization at the national and the international levels, Cervone discusses how state-led modernization, which began in the 1960s, created political openings by generating new economic formations and social categories. Long Live Atahualpa sheds new light on indigenous peoples operating at the crossroads of global capitalism and neoliberal reforms as they redefine historically rooted relationships of subordination.

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Making a New World

Founding Capitalism in the Bajío and Spanish North America

John Tutino

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Making Samba

A New History of Race and Music in Brazil

by Marc A. Hertzman

In November 1916, a young Afro-Brazilian musician named Donga registered sheet music for the song "Pelo telefone" ("On the Telephone") at the National Library in Rio de Janeiro. This apparently simple act—claiming ownership of a musical composition—set in motion a series of events that would shake Brazil's cultural landscape. Before the debut of "Pelo telephone," samba was a somewhat obscure term, but by the late 1920s, the wildly popular song had helped to make it synonymous with Brazilian national music.

The success of "Pelo telephone" embroiled Donga in controversy. A group of musicians claimed that he had stolen their work, and a prominent journalist accused him of selling out his people in pursuit of profit and fame. Within this single episode are many of the concerns that animate Making Samba, including intellectual property claims, the Brazilian state, popular music, race, gender, national identity, and the history of Afro-Brazilians in Rio de Janeiro. By tracing the careers of Rio's pioneering black musicians from the late nineteenth century until the 1970s, Marc A. Hertzman revises the histories of samba and of Brazilian national culture.

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