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Cork University Press

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The Irish Soccer Split

by Cormac Moore

The Irish Football Association (IFA) was founded in Belfast in 1880. It was the governing body for soccer for the whole of the island of Ireland. Soccer in Ireland was united for over forty years. It was, though, an uneasy alliance. Many in the south believed the governing body was heavily biased towards Ulster. Most internationals were played in Belfast, most players selected were from the North-East. With the country moving politically towards partition, soccer in Ireland was arguably affected more by the political environment than any other sport. As tensions rose between unionist and nationalist communities, soccer, with strong support bases in both communities, became embroiled in the conflict, playing host to many ugly sectarian incidents.Divisions in the sport reached a climax after the First World War, culminating in the split of 1921 when Leinster seceded from the IFA and formed the Football Association of Ireland (FAI).Making use of extensive primary sources from the IFA, FAI, the English FA and the Leinster Football Association as well as contemporary newspaper sources, The Irish Soccer Split details the events and causes that led to the split in soccer in Ireland. It compares soccer to other sports that remained or became united after partition. The Irish Soccer Split recounts the early years of the FAI and its attempts to gain international recognition. Many efforts were made to heal the division throughout the 1920s and the early 1930s. Efforts were renewed during the Troubles in the 1970s and 1980s to bring about an all-Ireland international team. Some came very close, all ultimately failed, leaving soccer in Ireland today, as it is politically, divided North and South.

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JG Farrell in His Own Words

Selected Letters and Diaries

Edited by Lavinia Greacen

The novelist J.G. Farrell – known to his friends as Jim – was drowned on August 11, 1979 when he was swept off rocks by a sudden storm while fishing in the West of Ireland. He was in his early forties. “Had he not sadly died so young,” remarked Salman Rushdie in 2008, “there is no question that he would today be one of the really major novelists of the English language. The three novels that he did leave are all in their different way extraordinary.”

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JG Farrell

The Making of a Writer

by Lavinia Greacen

This new, expanded edition of the widely praised biography of the Booker Prize-winning author JG Farrell is timely. His literary achievement is still in the ascendent, as proved by the posthumous award in 2010 of the ‘Lost’ Booker for ‘Troubles’, decided by international e-vote. That made him a double Booker winner, and the publicity given to his renowned Empire Trilogy novels has left the general reading public wanting to know more. Lavinia Greacen has uncovered fresh material and additional photographs since the publication of the first edition, shedding further light on Farrell’s short life and tragic death, as well as the development of his writing career. The result is a fascinating and compelling story about the man described by the latest Estudios Irlandeses as ‘one of the English language’s most accomplished and enigmatic figures’.The life of the novelist J.G. Farrell (1935 – 1979) is almost stranger than fiction. He was a schoolboy sporting hero struck down by polio, a dedicated writer living on a shoestring who was awarded the Booker Prize in 1973, and, with his literary reputation secure and a newly-converted house on the scenic west Cork coastline, he was drowned at the age of 44 while fishing from rocks nearby. This expanded biography, interweaving letters and interviews from sources previously unknown, tells the moving story of his peripatetic life. It ranges from his childhood in Ireland to public school and university in England; from his base in London, where most of his novels took shape, to extended stays in France and the United States, and to periods spent in Mexico, India, Vietnam and Singapore. Readers will discover that Farrell’s celebrated Empire Trilogy, which includes Troubles, The Siege of Krishnapur and The Singapore Grip, reflects his own travels and personal experiences, as well as his unique wit and imagination. This biography reveals the very private man behind the celebrated literary novelist. ‘After reading it’, wrote Gerald Dawe, Senior Lecturer in English at Trinity College, Dublin, ‘I felt not only that I knew J.G. Farrell, but that I, too, mourned his loss as if he were a friend.’

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John McGahern and the Imagination of Tradition

by Stanley van der Ziel

John McGahern (1934-2006) has been widely acknowledged as one of the foremost Irish prose writers of the twentieth and the early twenty-first century. McGahern has traditionally been regarded as a ‘chronicler’ of the lives of farmers, teachers and policemen in the Irish midlands in the twentieth century. The social and historical veracity which so many readers admire in his novels and stories accounts for his popular success in his native country. It has also been the subject of a significant body of criticism of his work. This new book on McGahern’s fiction argues how he was not only an acute social commentator but also an intelligent and perceptive reader interested in the nature and function of literature. It presents McGahern as a highly literary writer aware of the various literary traditions he had inherited, and shows how his imagination was shaped by his lifelong immersion in Irish, English and European literature. Drawing on archival material as well as on original close readings of his fiction, Stanley van der Ziel examines how McGahern’s reading of classic books and authors determined the concerns of his novels and stories, by placing some key elements of McGahern’s aesthetic in their appropriate literary contexts.

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Léann an Dúchais

Aistí in Ómós do Ghearóid Ó Crualaoich

Edited by Stiofán Ó Cadhla and Diarmuid Ó Giolláin

This collection of fourteen essays covers a wide range of material that reflects the current range of enquiry within the traditional discipline of folklore, the range of interaction between it and various other disciplines, and indeed the breadth of Gearóid Ó Crualaoich’s own interests. Areas covered include the history and practice of fieldwork / collection, the historical and current interaction between the oral and written traditions in Ireland, the use of oral sources for historiography, the ideologies underlying the establishment of museums in Ireland and internationally, and individual studies of oral and material phenomena, an Ghaeilge agus an idé-eolaíocht pholaitiúil .

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Landscape and Society in Contemporary Ireland

by Brendan McGrath

This book is both about exceptional Irish landscapes like the Burren and also the everyday landscape experience in Ireland. The aim of the book is to give an account of contemporary Irish landscape and to describe and explain how it has changed over the last forty years and how it continues to change

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The Life and Music of James Wilson

by Mark Fitzgerald

This book is the first study of the Irish composer James Wilson (1922–2005). A founding member of Aosdana in the 1950s and 60s, Wilson was a key figure in the Music Associatoon of Ireland and played an important role in developing the structures that support composers and musicians in Ireland today.

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The Life and Work of George Boole

A Prelude to the Digital Age

by Desmond MacHale

This book, aimed at the general reader and now available in paperback for the first time, is the first full-length biography of George Boole (1815–1864) who has been variously described as the founder of pure mathematics, one of the fathers of computer science and discoverer of symbolic logic. Boole is mostly remembered as a mathematician and logician whose work found application in computer science long after his death, but this biography reveals Boole as much more than a mathematical genius; he was a child prodigy, self-taught linguist and practical scientist, turbulent academic and devoted teacher, social reformer and poet, psychologist and humanitarian, religious thinker and good family man – truly a nineteenth-century polymath.

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Listen, O Isles, unto me

Studies in Medieval Word and Image in honour of Jennifer O'Reilly

Edited by Elizabeth Mullins and Diarmuid Scully

This interdisciplinary collection, which brings together new research on a range of patristic and medieval texts and visual materials, sets the cultural transformation of early medieval Ireland and Britain in the context of these islands’ inheritance from late antiquity and their engagement with the wider medieval world. It testifies to the imaginative ways in which scholars and artists assimilated and creatively re-interpreted the Christian and Mediterranean culture they encountered through the coming of Christianity, a central theme in the work of Dr Jennifer O’Reilly.

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Making Christian Landscapes in Atlantic Europe

Conversion and Consolidation in the Early Middle Ages

edited by Tomás Ó Carragáin and Sam Turner

Landscapes across Europe were transformed, both physically and conceptually, during the early medieval period (c AD 400-1200), and these changes were bound up with the conversion to Christianity and the development of ecclesiastical power structures. Whilst Christianity represented a more or less common set of beliefs and ideas, early medieval societies were characterised by vibrant diversity: much can potentially be learned about these societies by comparing and contrasting how they adapted Christianity to suit local circumstances. This is the first book to adopt a comparative landscape approach to this crucial subject.It considers the imprint of early medieval Christianity on landscapes along the continent’s western shore from Galicia to Norway, and across the northern islands from Britain and Ireland to Iceland. The construction of new monuments clearly led to some major physical changes, but landscapes are not just affected by tangible, material alterations: they are also shaped by new types of knowledge and changing perceptions. Christianity was associated with many such changes including new ways of seeing the land that directly affected how landscapes were inhabited and managed. By examining how people chose to shape their landscapes, this book provides fresh perspectives on the Christianisation of Atlantic Europe.

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