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End-of-Life Care:

Ethics and Law

Edited by Joan McCarthy, Mary Donnelly, Dolores Dooley, Louise Campbell and David Smith

This book offers an Ethical Framework for end-of-life decision making in healthcare settings. The Framework, consisting of eight Modules of Learning, is a set of educational resources for health professionals, allied professionals, healthcare ethics and law lecturers and students. It aims to foster and support ethically and legally sound clinical practice in end-of-life treatment and care in Ireland.

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The Female Figure in Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s Poetry

This is a six chapter study of the image of the female in Ní Chuilleanáin’s poetry emphasizing the ways in which she revises conventional cultural images of women in order to challenge stereotypical images and create a more multidimensional perspective on women’s lives and achievements. It explores the way in which she uses history, myth and folklore, religion and ritual, and architectural space to revise and create alternative female figures.

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Flann O’Brien

Contesting Legacies

This book brings together a number of established Flann O’Brien scholars (Keith Hopper, Joseph Brooker, Jennika Baines, Neil Murphy, Thierry Robin) Joyceans (John McCourt, Thomas Jackson Rice), authors (Julian Gough), translators (Adrian Otoiu) and emerging Flann scholars to broaden and develop the critical space opened up by various conferences and events held during the Flann O’Brien centenary year. This will be achieved by re-drafting the Flann O’Brien canon, considering him in new and broader inter/national contexts and by testing the previously under-explored range of critical perspectives through which his work may be profitably approached.

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Flann O’Brien

Problems With Authority

edited by Ruben Borg, Paul Fagan, John McCourt

With its penchant for dissecting rehearsed attitudes and subverting expectations, Flann O’Brien’s writing displays an uncanny knack for comic doubling and self-contradiction. Focusing on the satirical energies and anti-authoritarian temperament invested in his style, Flann O'Brien: Problems with Authority interrogates the author's clowning with linguistic, literary, legal, bureaucratic, political, economic, academic, religious and scientific powers in the sites of the popular, the modern and the traditional.By taking O’Brien’s riotous clashes with diverse manifestations of authority as an entry point, the volume draws together disparate elements of the writer's work. Each chapter reflects on some aspect of his iconoclastic impulses; on the impertinent send-ups of pretension and orthodoxy to be found in his fiction, columns, and writing for stage and screen; on the very nature of his comedic inspiration.... Among the topics addressed are O’Brien’s satirical use of the pseudonym, the cliché and the Irish language; his irreverent repackaging of inherited myths, sacred texts and formative canons; and his refusal of literary and ideological closure.The emerging picture is of a complex literary project that is always, in some way, a writing against the weight of received wisdoms and inherited sureties. Together, these essays invite us to reconsider O’Brien’s profile as, at once, a local comedian, a critic of provincial attitudes, a formal innovator and an inimitable voice in the twentieth-century avant-garde. Most pressingly, Flann O'Brien: Problems with Authority compels us to consider the many ways in which O’Brien’s texts bring into sharp relief the kinship between comic genius and an anti-authoritarian temperament.

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Freedom

by Kevin Ryan and Fiona Whelan

As a figure of thought, the concept of freedom tends to shuttle between abstraction and ideal – the first exemplified by Isaiah Berlin’s contrast between negative and positive liberty, and the second by Philip Pettit’s neo-republican conception of freedom as non-domination. Located within the realm of lived experience however, freedom is invariably forged from context-specific constraints.The point of departure is to approach freedom as a practice which is ‘conditioned’ by enclosures of power/knowledge which are also enclosures of the imagination. In terms of destination, the objective is to explore the question of how to breach such enclosures, thereby opening out spaces for alternative ways of practising freedom to emerge. The analysis will encompass three fields of practice and examine how freedom is drawing inwards around the freedom to compete in a zero-sum game among winners and losers. To get to grips with the ‘how’ of this requires dispensing with analytical tools that operate on the basis of dichotomy (such as power/resistance, freedom/domination, top-down/bottom-up) while also stretching the analysis across distinct-yet-related fields of action. The book will thus begin with a brief discussion that sets out key concepts and ideas before putting these to work through an analysis of 1. Sport & Academia, and 2. Art.

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Going to the Well for Water

The Seamus Ennis Field Diary 1942-1946

Ríonach uí Ógáin

This is a translation of the diaries of Seamus Ennis, fulltime collector of music and song with the Irish Folklore Commission describing his day-to-day work, the people he met, the material he gathered and his constant communication with the head office of the commission in Dublin. In addition to presenting the history of folklore collecting, the book also illustrates life in the Gaeltacht during the Second World War. Although best known as a piper, Ennis was a collector par excellence. The book is a personal account of his field work during those years.

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Gold, Silver and Green

The Irish Olympic Journey, 1896-1924

Kevin McCarthy

The book focuses on the Irish and Irish diasporal involvement in the Olympic Games. It discusses in detail the sporting involvement but, even more so, the political and national battles which accompanied the Irish Olympic journey prior to independence. It challenges our traditional perceptions of sporting nationalism and places the Irish story in a quite unique international context, showing how decisions made in London, Lausanne and New York had a profound impact on the Irish sporting, and national, destiny.

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Great Deeds in Ireland

Richard Stanihurst’s De Rebus in Hibernia Gestis

This is a translation of Richard Stanihurst’s De Rebus in Hibernia Gestis which was originally published at Leiden in the Netherlands by the famous Plantin press in 1584. It was the first history of Ireland to appear on continent. The core of book is five parts – four chapters called ‘books’ and an appendix. There is also a preface and index. Our edition will consist of the Latin text with a parallel translation plus a scholarly introduction and extensive annotation.

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Hellenism and Reconciliation in Ireland from Yeats to Field Day

This book is a genealogy of reconciliation in modern Ireland. As Seamus Deane has written, reconciliation stands at a nexus between politics and aesthetics in Irish writing, and has therefore often been a vehicle of colonial ideology. This book shows that the term often fits into a pattern that the author calls the ‘iconography of reconciliation’.This iconography began in the 1810s when Samuel Taylor Coleridge synthesized Edmund Burke’s thoughts about Ciceronian conciliatio and Aristotelian ethos with Schlegelian literary organicism. That is, Coleridge identified what Artistotle called ‘ethical music’ with the ‘balanced’ personality of Romantic literary genius itself. Wallace then shows that Matthew Arnold and Edward Dowden adopted this Coleridgean synthesis and used it to make their writings about Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Sophocles (now icons of reconciliation) chime with their writings in favour of the Anglo-Irish Union.Moving on to the twentieth century, Wallace shows first that Yeats and Joyce contested the Unionist icons and, later, that Conor Cruise O’Brien revived them in his writings about Northern Ireland. Wallace finishes by arguing that Field Day countered O’Brien’s ‘Sophoclean’ reading of the Troubles with their own, more ethically responsive icons of Sophoclean reconciliation between 1980 and 1990.

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Imperial Refugee

Olivia Manning’s Fictions of War

by Eve Patten

Olivia Manning (1908-1980) had a reputation as a difficult personality and this has threatened to obscure her reputation as a writer. The book aims to recover Manning’s place as a pre-eminent novelist of British wartime experience. Manning belonged to a British literary generation which held tenaciously to its diverse Irish connections in the wartime years, but, as with Cyril Connolly or Lawrence Durrell, her claims on Irishness were intermittent and often distinctly pragmatic.The book deals in depth with a diverse range of biographical, historical and literary detail. It examines the troubled interface between public and domestic narratives” and the ways in which Manning developed, through her experiences of living in Romania, Athens, Egypt and Jerusalem, her creative methods of politicising the refugee experience. As well as looking at Manning’s novels within their diverse settings the book also examines the varied literary modes Manning deploys and adapts – the gothic, autobiography and writing the self, the serial novel, the wartime and epic and more.Although interest in World War II literature has been proliferating over the past twenty years a full length study of Manning will be of great interest to scholars of modern British literature and cultural history. In the fields of postcolonial and transnational studies, Manning should be a necessary presence as she crosses geographical, political, and cultural borders in her life and writing. Her experiments with ‘the serial form’ also provide critical gloss to studies of modernism and realism as well as being of great import to the now burgeoning study of the Middlebrow.

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