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Cork University Press

Cork University Press

Website: http://www.corkuniversitypress.com

Cork University Press aims to stimulate Irish learning by reflecting distinctive and distinguished scholarship in its lists. The Press began publishing in 1925 and is the oldest university press in Ireland. Its philosophy has been to encourage a broad spectrum of debate in the field of Irish Studies by publishing research which engages with contemporary cultural debate.

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Cork University Press

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Results 21-30 of 53

Hellenism and Reconciliation in Ireland from Yeats to Field Day Cover

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Hellenism and Reconciliation in Ireland from Yeats to Field Day

This book is a genealogy of reconciliation in modern Ireland. As Seamus Deane has written, reconciliation stands at a nexus between politics and aesthetics in Irish writing, and has therefore often been a vehicle of colonial ideology. This book shows that the term often fits into a pattern that the author calls the ‘iconography of reconciliation’.This iconography began in the 1810s when Samuel Taylor Coleridge synthesized Edmund Burke’s thoughts about Ciceronian conciliatio and Aristotelian ethos with Schlegelian literary organicism. That is, Coleridge identified what Artistotle called ‘ethical music’ with the ‘balanced’ personality of Romantic literary genius itself. Wallace then shows that Matthew Arnold and Edward Dowden adopted this Coleridgean synthesis and used it to make their writings about Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Sophocles (now icons of reconciliation) chime with their writings in favour of the Anglo-Irish Union.Moving on to the twentieth century, Wallace shows first that Yeats and Joyce contested the Unionist icons and, later, that Conor Cruise O’Brien revived them in his writings about Northern Ireland. Wallace finishes by arguing that Field Day countered O’Brien’s ‘Sophoclean’ reading of the Troubles with their own, more ethically responsive icons of Sophoclean reconciliation between 1980 and 1990.

Imperial Refugee Cover

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Imperial Refugee

Olivia Manning’s Fictions of War

by Eve Patten

Olivia Manning (1908-1980) had a reputation as a difficult personality and this has threatened to obscure her reputation as a writer. The book aims to recover Manning’s place as a pre-eminent novelist of British wartime experience. Manning belonged to a British literary generation which held tenaciously to its diverse Irish connections in the wartime years, but, as with Cyril Connolly or Lawrence Durrell, her claims on Irishness were intermittent and often distinctly pragmatic.The book deals in depth with a diverse range of biographical, historical and literary detail. It examines the troubled interface between public and domestic narratives” and the ways in which Manning developed, through her experiences of living in Romania, Athens, Egypt and Jerusalem, her creative methods of politicising the refugee experience. As well as looking at Manning’s novels within their diverse settings the book also examines the varied literary modes Manning deploys and adapts – the gothic, autobiography and writing the self, the serial novel, the wartime and epic and more.Although interest in World War II literature has been proliferating over the past twenty years a full length study of Manning will be of great interest to scholars of modern British literature and cultural history. In the fields of postcolonial and transnational studies, Manning should be a necessary presence as she crosses geographical, political, and cultural borders in her life and writing. Her experiments with ‘the serial form’ also provide critical gloss to studies of modernism and realism as well as being of great import to the now burgeoning study of the Middlebrow.

Ireland Through European Eyes Cover

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Ireland Through European Eyes

Western Europe, the EEC and Ireland, 1945-1973

Edited by Mervyn O’Driscoll, Dermot Keogh, and Jérôme aan de Wiel

This novel collection draws together a European field of expertise and resources. It reveals how Belgian, French, Italian, Luxembourg, Dutch, and West German politicians, policymakers and commentators perceived independent Ireland from the end of the Second World War until Irish accession to the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1973. These six West European states initiated and sustained the integration process from the debris of the Second World War. They offered Ireland a developmental and international alternative to small nation state obscurity and vulnerability. Together with the EEC institutions of the Commission and the Council of Ministers principally, these states both transformed European relations and determined the fate of Ireland’s application to enter the EEC after 1961.

Irish Blood English Heart Cover

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Irish Blood English Heart

Second Generation Irish Musicians in England

Sean Campbell

Second-generation Irish musicians have played a vital role in the history of popular music in England. This book explores the role of Irish ethnicity in the lives and work of these musicians, focusing on three high-profile projects: Kevin Rowland and Dexys Midnight Runners, Shane MacGowan and The Pogues, and Morrissey/Marr and The Smiths. The book locates these musicians in a hyphenated ‘Irish-Englishness’ marked by ‘in-between-ness’ and explores the different ways that they engaged with this in-betweenness through their creative work and their engagements with audiences, the media and the music industry.

Irish Catholicism and Science Cover

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Irish Catholicism and Science

From "Godless Colleges" to the Celtic Tiger

by Don O’Leary

Science and Roman Catholicism have both acted as powerful agents of change in Ireland and elsewhere. But the interaction between Catholicism and science in Ireland has received very little attention from historians to date. The purpose of this book, therefore, is to address this longstanding deficiency in Irish historical literature. There is a strong international dimension to this study. The period of interest is from the Famine to the “Celtic Tiger.”The subject matter encompasses a diverse range of topics. Issues indigenous to Ireland include recurring controversies about university education, the relative paucity of Catholic scientists in nineteenth-century Ireland, the perception of science as a trait of a Protestant and colonial mindset, anti-Catholicism and science, the economic and political conditions in the Irish Free State which worked against the growth of science in Ireland, and the impact of science and technology on Irish Catholicism in recent decades. These subjects are interwoven with topics which extend far beyond Irish interest - such as evolutionary debates, the question of whether or not Catholicism was compatible with science, anti-modernism in the Catholic Church, Vatican pronouncements on science, the theological implications of extra-terrestrial life and of Big Bang cosmology, whether human freewill is real or not, and the importance of science in arguments about the existence of God.

The Irish Dancing Cover

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The Irish Dancing

Cultural Politics and Identities 1900-2000

by Barbara O'Connor

This book engages with the role of dance in Irish culture and society over the course of the twentieth century. It adopts a perspective that sees dance as a prism through which to view key aspects of Irish society over the period under review. In terms of its academic provenance, it can be located broadly in the fields of Irish Cultural History/Sociology and Irish Cultural Studies. It selects a number of key moments or eras to explore the role of dance in constructing and reflecting a number of specific cultural identities, namely national identity, gender, ethnic, postmodern and global. Each chapter focuses on one specific kind of cultural identity though themes of gender and social class run through many of the chapters.

The Irish District Court Cover

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The Irish District Court

A Social Portrait

by Caroline O'Nolan

This book is about the Irish District Court which is a key linchpin in the Irish criminal justice system: the District Court is the court in which all persons charged with criminal offences are initially processed and, despite its limited jurisdiction, it accounts for the majority of committals to Irish prisons. The book presents courtroom based research which unveils the largely hidden decisions and processes of the District Court while also providing valuable insights into Irish policing priorities and practices. The numerous extracts of court proceedings which are interspersed throughout this book provide a detailed and nuanced picture of courtroom actors and courtroom practices and ensure readers acquire an in depth understanding of sentencing decisions and practices. The book describes the increased presence of foreign defendants in the District Court and considers how this local court has adapted to deal with global citizens. The account presented illustrates that while penal institutions and practices are fashioned to fit the fabric of local societies, in the current era of movement and flux these institutions and practices are also shaped by exogenous forces such as migration, increased mobility and transnational crime.

The Irish Novel 1960 - 2010 Cover

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The Irish Novel 1960 - 2010

by George O’Brien

The increased visibility of the Irish novel in recent years has been one of the outstanding developments in contemporary Irish literature. This development has coincided with a period of significant change in Ireland as a whole. The Irish Novel 1960-2010 is the first book to study how the novel has been involved in discussing the seeds of change and the response to change as it evolved. The result is a wide-ranging survey, accessible and rewarding for both the student and the general public. Original and insightful it is written with a distinctive blend of sympathy and engagement. The Irish Novel 1960-2010 is an invaluable guide to an important cultural phenomenon.Authors covered:Edna O’Brien, Sam Hanna Bell, John Broderick, Michael Farrell, Samuel Beckett, Brian Moore, Aidan Higgins, Flann O’Brien, Anthony C. West, James Plunkett, J.G. Farrell,Francis Stuart, Jennifer Johnston, Vincent Banville, Ian Cochrane, Maurice Leitch, Caroline Blackwood, Benedict Kiely, Patrick McGinley, John McGahern, Julia O’Faolain, John Banville, Dorothy Nelson, Bernard MacLaverty, Desmond Hogan, Mary Leland, J.M. O’Neill, Carlo Gébler, William Trevor, Timothy O’Grady, Dermot Bolger, Hugo Hamilton, Patrick McCabe, Roddy Doyle, Dermot Healy, Emma Donoghue, Seamus Deane, Anne Haverty, Joseph O’Connor, Glenn Patterson, Mary Morrissy, Eoin McNamee, Deirdre Madden, Keith Ridgway, Colm Tóibín, Sebastian Barry, Gerard Donovan, Anne Enright, Joseph O’Neill, Colum McCann, Paul Murray

The Irish Poet and the Natural World Cover

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The Irish Poet and the Natural World

An Anthology of Verse in English from the Tudors to the Romantics

This annotated anthology of poems makes available a rich variety of Irish texts depicting the relationship between humans and the environment between the years 1580 and 1820. More than a hundred poems are printed here, together with an extensive critical introduction, notes on each text, and a full bibliography. All the poets whose work is represented were born in Ireland or are identified as Irish.As well as re-publishing the work of major poets such as Oliver Goldsmith, Laurence Whyte and William Drummond, this anthology includes many works by little known or anonymous authors. This volume also reflects current scholarship on the relationship between literature and the environment, enriching our understanding of attitudes in pre-Romantic Ireland towards changing landscapes and agricultural practices, towards human responsibility for the non-human world, and towards the relationship between nature and aesthetics. As well as adding considerably to existing knowledge of the printing and reading of poetry in Ireland during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, this anthology also traces the developments in sensibility in Irish poetry during this period, offering new perspectives on the advent of Romanticism in England and on the ways in which this revolutionised the relationship between nature and representation.

JG Farrell in His Own Words  Cover

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JG Farrell in His Own Words

Selected Letters and Diaries

Edited by Lavinia Greacen

The novelist J.G. Farrell – known to his friends as Jim – was drowned on August 11, 1979 when he was swept off rocks by a sudden storm while fishing in the West of Ireland. He was in his early forties. “Had he not sadly died so young,” remarked Salman Rushdie in 2008, “there is no question that he would today be one of the really major novelists of the English language. The three novels that he did leave are all in their different way extraordinary.”

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