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Chinese University Press

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A Brighter Side

Protective and Risk Factors in the Rehabilitation of Chronic Drug Abusers in Hong Kong

Yuet Wah Cheung

Despite the increase of research investigating various aspects of the drug problem in Hong Kong in the past decade, little was known about the pathway to continuous drug use or recovery of chronic drug abusers. This book reports upon a pioneer longitudinal study of chronic drug abusers in Hong Kong that used an analytical framework consisting of sociological, psychological and treatment variables to explore the protective and risk factors affecting the relapse or abstinence of chronic drug abusers. The findings of the study have significant implications for theories of drug use and rehabilitation, especially highlighting the roles of social capital, self-efficacy, short-term abstinence and harm reduction in the chronic drug abuser’s road to recovery.

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The burden of being bama

by Ko Ko Thett

This pocket-sized paperback is one of the twenty-two titles published for 2015 Hong Kong International Poetry Nights. The theme of IPHHK2015 is “Poetry and Conflict”. 21 international poets from 18 different places are invited to participate in recitations, symposia and sharing sessions of the Poetry Nights. A recitation focusing on 10 local Hong Kong poets, “Hong Kong Cantonese Poetry Night” is included. This collection seeks to make accessible the best of contemporary international poetry with outstanding translations.

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Canyon in the Body (English and Simplified Chinese)

Lan Lan, Translated from Chinese by Fiona Sze-Lorrain

The tenderness of Lan Lan’s poetry is steely and perfectly judged. She shows us a world of subtle adjustments and intelligent beauty—although the stakes she deals in could not be higher. As its title suggests, Canyon in the Body uncovers both existential and domestic meanings, writ both large and small in the human environment. Fiona Sze-Lorrain’s limpid, unforced translations do the poet, and her Anglophone readers, a great service. —Fiona Sampson, Editor of Poem and Professor of Poetry, Roehampton University Lan Lan is discussing happiness with us. She cuts time, our faces, our dreams, our crystal gaze. So how does this happen: when we leave her, washed, new, mellow, happy that she conducted us, drowned us, left us hovering in this . . . what? nothing? Blessed be the day I discovered her writing. —Tomaž Šalamun

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The Changing Room

Selected poetry of Zhai Yongming

Translated by Andrea Lingenfelter

The author of six volumes of poetry, Zhai Yongming first became prominent in the mid-1980s with the publication of her twenty-poem cycle, "Woman," a work that forcefully articulated a female point-of-view in China??s largely patriarchal society. Her powerful imagery and forthright voice resonated with many readers. Zhai has continued to hone her critique of tranditional attitudes towards women, quickly becoming one of China??s foremost feminist voices and a major force in the contemporary literary scene. She is also an installation artist and prolific essayist, and stages poetry readings and other cultural events at the bar she owns in her native Chengdu.

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China Review

Vol. 13 (2013) through current issue

The China Review is a continuation of the China Review, an annual publication of Chinese University Press since 1990. It publishes twice a year in April and October since 2001; a scholarly journal covering various disciplines of study on Greater China and its people, namely, domestic politics and international relations; society, business and economic development; modern history, the arts and cultural studies.

It is the only China-based English journal devoted to the study of Greater China.

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China’s Great Transformation

Selected Essays on Confucianism, Modernization, and Democracy

Ambrose Y. C. King

This book examines how Confucian traditions have shaped modernity in East Asia. Ambrose Y. C. King discusses how China and East Asia developed a model of modern civilization distinct from the Western model of modernization, which involves not only a process of deconstructing the cultural tradition but also a process of reconstructing it. He shows how the experience of modernization diverges within different Chinese societies, namely Hong Kong, Mainland China, and Taiwan. By highlighting the impact of Confucianism, he argues that Confucianism contains the seeds of modernization and transformation, and that in the right institutional settings these seeds influence the course of development. King focuses on how Confucian ideas and values underpinning the foundation of East Asian societies, including social civility, political governance, the role of the family, and moral regulation, matter to the modern social and political transformations of Chinese societies today.

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Chinese Poetic Writing

The Case of Hong Kong

François Cheng, Translated by Donald A. Riggs and Jerome P. Seaton

Chinese Poetic Writing has been considered by many to be one of the most innovative studies of Chinese poetry. Cheng illustrates his text with an annotated anthology of 135 poems from the golden age of Tang Dynasty, featuring lively translations of the works of Tu Fu, Li Po, Wang Wei and other poets. The 1982 translation, based on the original French 1977 edition has been greatly expanded by Cheng with many new additions.

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Chinese Rhyme-Prose

Poems in the Fu Form from the Han and Six Dynasties Periods

Translated by Burton Watson • Preface by Lucas Klein

The fu, or rhyme-prose, is a major poetic form in Chinese literature, most popular between the 2nd century b.c. and 6th century a.d. Unlike what is usually considered Chinese poetry, it is a hybrid of prose and rhymed verse, more expansive than the condensed lyrics, verging on what might be called Whitmanesque. The thirteen long poems included here are descriptions of and meditations on such subjects as mountains and abandoned cities, the sea and the wind, owls and goddesses, partings and the idle life.

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City of the Dead and Song of the Night

translated by Gilbert C. F. Fong and Mabel Lee

Presented in English for the first time in this book are two plays by Gao Xingjian originally written in Chinese: City of the Dead and Song of the Night. City of the Dead is the first of Gao Xingjian’s plays to focus fully on the male-female relationship. In this work, he transforms a wellknown ancient morality tale, “Zhuangzi Tests His Wife”, which had been used to caution women against being unfaithful to their husbands, into a modern play that is in keeping with his own sympathetic stance towards women in male-female relationships. In a certain sense, City of the Dead may be regarded as defining Gao’s fundamental view that men possess a flippant and cavalier attitude to their female sexual partner or partners, and that women who become involved in sexual relationships with men are therefore doomed to suffer. Among Gao Xingjian’s theatrical portrayals of the female psyche, Song of the Night is his most ambitious and most detailed one. Gao’s articulation of the female psyche is embedded in a solid substratumbedrock of his autobiographical impulses. It is through female actors, and his range of ingenious theatrical innovations that Gao succeeds in convincingly portraying his personal view of the power dynamics generated in male-female sexual relationships, and how these are played out. Together, these two plays advance Gao Xingjian’s innovative theatrical experiments in dramatic prose across linguistic and cultural boundaries. The English translations of City of the Dead and Song of the Night in the present volume will lead to significant English-language productions of these plays, and concomitantly a greater understanding of Gao’s plays.

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Civilizing the Chinese, Competing with the West

Study Societies in Late Qing China

Chen Hon Fai

This book explores the development of late 19th century study societies in China against the context of the decline of the imperial Qing government and its control on ideological production, widespread social unrest, and intrusions by Western imperialist states. The author uncovers the history of civil society activism in China by examining the study societies in Shanghai, Beijing, and Hunan, which were organized around the goal of promoting and defending the Confucian religion. Illustrating a facet of the civil society that emerged in China as a reaction to the influences of Christianity, the modernization of Confucianism, and nationalist state formation, this study extends understanding of the unique and complex processes of Chinese political and cultural modernization in ways that differed from that of Western societies.

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