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Chinese University Press

Website: http://www.chineseupress.com/

The Chinese University Press was established in 1977 as the publishing house of The Chinese University of Hong Kong. It is a non-profit organization devoted to the advancement, conservation and dissemination of knowledge, as well as the promotion of scholastic interchange between the Chinese and other cultures.


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Chinese University Press

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Huangdi Neijing Cover

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Huangdi Neijing

A Synopsis with Commentaries

Translated and Annotated by Y. C. Kong

Neijing is traditional Chinese medicine; it encompasses all the central tenets of Chinese medicine practised today. Neijing zhiyao, in two volumes, compiled by Li Zhong-zi of the Ming dynasty, was carefully proof-read by Xue Sheng-bai of the Qing dynasty. Among the hundred or so annotated editions of Neijing Suwen and Lingshu that appeared in different formats and styles in previous generations, only Neijing zhiyao compiled by Mr. Li Nian-er of the Ming dynasty is the most succinct but pithy. —— from Sibu Zonglu Yiyaobian

I Can Almost See The Clouds of Dust Cover

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I Can Almost See The Clouds of Dust

Selected Poetry of Yu Xiang

Translated by Fiona Sze-Lorrain

Yu Xiang comfortably inhabits the negative space between viewer and subject, artist and artwork, the lover and her beloved in this acrobatic, ekphrastic, meditatively-compelling collection. Fiona Sze-Lorrain’s crisp translation invites American readers to experience Yu Xiang’s poetic mastery half a world away from its formative origins in the Shandong province, bringing into focus the voice of one of China’s most celebrated and memorable female voices. “I have a lonely yet / stable life,” Yu admits at one point in the book. “This is my house. If / you happen to walk in, it’s certainly not / for my rambling notes.” Yu Xiang disarms her reader with exacting imagery and pathos in order to tell the aching, unavoidable truth of womanhood in these striking poems. —Dorianne Laux

I Like Hong Kong Cover

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I Like Hong Kong

Art and Deterritorialization

Frank Vigneron

Contemporary Chinese art is nowadays a subject area widely taught and researched in academic and non-academic publications, but it has not yet been studied by 'localizing' the research in specific cultural areas within the Chinese world. Selecting Hong Kong for a first such study was an obvious choice, since Hong Kong culture has had for already quite a long time very specific features which have put it apart from the generally accepted definition of Chinese national culture. Although it is not a survey of 'Hong Kong art,' as such a study would demand many more books, the works of about eighty artists working in Hong Kong (and sometimes outside) have been analyzed and contextualized in these pages.

In the Serious Light of Nothing Cover

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In the Serious Light of Nothing

Peter Minter, Edited by Bei Dao, Shelby Chan, Gilbert Fong, Lucas Klein, and Christopher Mattison

Following the convening of Hong Kong International Poetry Nights 2013, The World of Words is a collection of selected works by some of the most internationally acclaimed poets today. The poem of "In the Serious Light of Nothing" by Peter Minter (Australia) is finest contemporary poetry in trilingual or bilingual presentation.

The Invisible Citizens of Hong Kong Cover

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The Invisible Citizens of Hong Kong

Art and Stories of Vietnamese Boatpeople

Sophia Suk-Mun Law

On May 3, 1975, Hong Kong received its first cohort of 3,743 Vietnamese boatpeople. The incident opened a 25-year history that belongs to a larger context of forced migration in modern social history. By researching all possible textual material available, the book provides a comprehensive review of the collective history of the Vietnamese boatpeople. Moreover, it intertwines historical archives with personal drawings created by the Vietnamese living in Hong Kong detention camps, recapping a collective memory with its human face. By interpreting and analyzing these drawings, the author demonstrates the expressive and communicative power of imagery as a form of language, and illustrates how art can tell a personal tragic story when language fails. She unfolds the stories and artworks throughout the whole book with the hope that new insights and meanings can be attained through the conscious review and re-interpretation of the past.

Islands or Continents Cover

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Islands or Continents

International Poetry Nights in Hong Kong 2013 (Single-Volume Anthology)

Edited by Bei Dao, Shelby Chan, Gilbert Fong, Lucas Klein, and Christopher Mattison

Following the convening of International Poetry Nights in Hong Kong 2013, Islands or Continents is a collection of selected works by some of the most internationally acclaimed poets today. Included are the poems of Adonis (Syria), Aase Berg (Sweden), Conchitina Cruz (The Philippines), Menna Elfyn (Wales), Lee Seongbok (South Korea), Tim Lilburn (Canada), Zeyar Lynn (Myanmar), Dunya Mikhail (Iraq), Peter Minter (Australia), Tomasz Różycki (Poland), Olvido García Valdés (Spain), Jeffrey Yang (USA), Raúl Zurita (Chile) as well as leading Chinese poets such as Natalia Chan, Han Dong, Lan Lan, Un Sio San, and Ye Mimi. The collection makes a treasured anthology of the finest contemporary poetry in trilingual or bilingual presentation.

The Ivory Tower and the Marble Citadel Cover

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The Ivory Tower and the Marble Citadel

Essays on Political Philosophy in Our Modern Era of Interacting Cultures

By Thomas A. Metzger

The Ivory Tower and the Marble Citadel opens up a new way of pursuing the critical development of political philosophy in today’s intercultural intellectual arena. Metzger holds that political philosophies are linguistically unavoidable efforts to infer the principles of morally legitimate government from a maximally enlightened conceptualization of the universal human condition. Because these efforts depend on a vocabulary embodying culturally inherited premises, textual analysis uncovering these premises and debate about how they should be revised are crucial for the improvement of political philosophy.

Learning to Emulate the Wise Cover

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Learning to Emulate the Wise

The Genesis of Chinese Philosophy as an Academic Discipline in Twentieth-Century China

Edited by John Makeham

Learning to Emulate the Wise is the first book of a three-volume series that constructs a historically informed, multidisciplinary framework to examine how traditional Chinese knowledge systems and grammars of knowledge construction interacted with Western paradigms in the formation and development of modern academic disciplines in China. Within this volume, John Makeham and several other noted sinologists and philosophers explore how the field of "Chinese philosophy" (Zhongguo Zhexue) was born and developed in the early decades of the twentieth century, examining its growth and relationship with European, American, and Japanese scholarship and philosophy. The work discusses an array of representative institutions and individuals, including FengYoulan, Fu Sinian, Hu Shi, Jin Yuelin, Liang Shuming, Nishi Amane, Tang Yongtong, Xiong Shili, Zhang Taiyan, and a range of Marxist philosophers. The epilogue discusses the intellectual-historical significance of these figures and throws into relief how Zhongguozhexue is understood today.

The Lost Generation Cover

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The Lost Generation

The Rustication of China’s Educated Youth (1968–1980)

By Michel Bonnin

The Lost Generation is a vital component to understanding Maoism. The book provides a comprehensive account of the critical movement during which seventeen million young "educated" city-dwellers were supposed to transform themselves into peasants, potentially for life. Bonnin closely examines the Chinese leadership's motivations and the methods that they used over time to implement their objectives, as well as the day-to-day lives of those young people in the countryside, their difficulties, their doubts, their resistance and, ultimately, their revolt. The author draws on a rich and diverse array of sources, concluding with a comprehensive assessment of the movement that shaped an entire generation, including a majority of today’s cultural, economic, and political elite.

A Loud Noise Cover

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A Loud Noise

Han Dong, Edited by Bei Dao, Shelby Chan, Gilbert Fong, Lucas Klein, and Christopher Mattison

Following the convening of Hong Kong International Poetry Nights 2013, The World of Words is a collection of selected works by some of the most internationally acclaimed poets today. The poem of "A Loud Noise" by Han Dong (China) is finest contemporary poetry in trilingual or bilingual presentation.

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