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Baylor University Press

Baylor University Press

Website: http://www.baylorpress.com/Home

We at Baylor University Press are passionate about books that have a vocation, ones that seek to do "good". In an age that is obsessed with information, we publish, promote, and cultivate wisdom, wisdom that will help better humanity today and usher in a more promising tomorrow.

Established in 1897, Baylor University Press publishes thirty-five new books each year for scholars, students, and intellectually curious general readers. With a leading program in religious studies, Baylor University Press also boasts stellar works of social criticism, publishing in the areas of cultural studies, sociology, rhetoric, political science, history, popular culture, and literary criticism. Baylor University Press is a member of the Association of American University Presses.


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Baylor University Press

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Facing a Pandemic Cover

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Facing a Pandemic

The African Church and the Crisis of Aids

Elias K. Bongmba

Facing a Pandemic traces the history and spread of the HIV/AIDS virus in Africa and its impact on African society and public policy before considering new priorities needed to combat the pandemic. The central argument is that the theological motif of the image of God invites a prophetic critique of the social environment in which HIV/AIDS thrives and calls for a praxis of love and compassion.

Faith, Hope, and Love Cover

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Faith, Hope, and Love

The Ecumenical Trio of Virtues

by Geoffrey Wainwright

Faith, hope, and love: these words recall one of the most familiar passages in the entirety of the Christian Scriptures and represent three uniquely Christian virtues given by God to the Church. Geoffrey Wainwright explores the contemporary ecumenical potential of these historic Christian virtues. Faith, hope, and love are given to each Christian and are intended to be incorporated in the nature and life of every gathered Christian body. Wainwright pairs each virtue with a practice instituted by Christ himself. Holy baptism teaches faith as an enacted confession. The Lord’s Prayer invites petition as an address of hope. The Lord’s Supper offers bread and wine as an embodiment of love. These historic practices orient all Christians backward in faith to the formative events of the cross of resurrection, forward in hope of the final consummation, and toward all others gathered around the shared meal. Wainwright insists that faith, hope, and love pave a path to unity for a historically divided Church.

The Faithful Citizen Cover

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The Faithful Citizen

Popular Christian Media and Gendered Civic Identities

Kristy Maddux

For decades, American popular media have instructed audiences about their roles and significance in the public sphere. In The Faithful Citizen, rhetorical critic Kristy Maddux argues that popular Christian media not only communicate avenues for civic engagement but do so in profoundly gendered terms. Her detailed interrogation of popular Christian movies, books, and television shows—the Left Behind series, Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, Amazing Grace, 7th Heaven, and the blockbuster The Da Vinci Code—exposes five competing models of how Christians should behave in the civic sphere as their gendered selves. What emerges is a typology that insightfully reveals how these varying faith-based models of engagement uniquely shape public discourse and influence the larger picture of contemporary politics.

Faithful Economics Cover

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Faithful Economics

The Moral Worlds of a Neutral Science

James W. Henderson and John L. Pisciotta, editors

Economics is a value laden enterprise - and this despite the oft repeated claims of neutrality, objectivity, and the absence of bias. This volume explores the relationship between Christianity and economics, arguing that the two can and should be integrated. While no single Christian perspective drives the book, the authors do share in common a belief that scholarship shaped by Christian commitments is entirely appropriate and should be an integral part of the professional life of Christian economist. In particular, this volume demonstrates how Christianity shapes the worldview an economist brings to the task, the questions an economist asks, and the policies an economist advocates.

Family and the Politics of Moderation Cover

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Family and the Politics of Moderation

Private Life, Public Goods, and the Rebirth of Social Individualism

Lauren K. Hall

In Family and the Politics of Moderation, Lauren K. Hall argues that the family is a fulcrum upon which societal values balance. Hall describes a set of intermediate institutions that hold the power to alter polarized political and cultural views—churches, religious institutions, local governments, social organizations, and importantly, the family. For Hall the family moderates between broad collectivity and strict individualism. She contends that the family as an intermediate entity wields the strength to guide society between extreme viewpoints, be they social, political, or cultural. Family and the Politics of Moderation thus generates an imperative to ensure the survival of the family as an integral pillar of society. 

Family Politics Cover

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Family Politics

The Idea of Marriage in Modern Political Thought

Scott Yenor

With crisp prose and intellectual fairness, Family Politics traces the treatment of the family in the philosophies of leading political thinkers of the modern world. What is family? What is marriage? In an effort to address contemporary society’s disputes over the meanings of these human social institutions, Scott Yenor carefully examines a roster of major and unexpected modern political philosophers—from Locke and Rousseau to Hegel and Marx to Freud and Beauvoir. He lucidly presents how these individuals developed an understanding of family in order to advance their goals of political and social reform. Through this exploration, Yenor unveils the effect of modern liberty on this foundational institution and argues that the quest to pursue individual autonomy has undermined the nature of marriage and jeopardizes its future.

Finding Faith, Losing Faith Cover

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Finding Faith, Losing Faith

Stories of Conversion and Apostasy

Scot McKnight and Hauna Ondrey

This book examines conversion stories as told by people who have actually undergone a conversion experience, including experiences of apostasy. The stories reveal that there is not just one"conversion story."Scot McKnight and Hauna Ondrey show that"conversion theory"helps explain why some people walk away from one religion, often to another, very different religion. The book confirms the usefulness-particularly for pastors, rabbis, and priests, and university and college teachers-of applying conversion theory to specific groups. However, the book's sensitive detailing of the stories themselves makes conversion more than a theoretical occurrence; it makes the immediacy, and often the difficulty, of conversion both real and moving.

Flannery O'Connor Cover

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Flannery O'Connor

Writing a Theology of Disabled Humanity

Timothy J. Basselin

Flannery O’Connor is one of America’s most unique Southern authors. Shortly after she began her writing career she was diagnosed with lupus. Despite her illness, O’Connor authored more than two dozen short stories and two novels. Her highly regionalized Southern Gothic stories often involve grotesque characters.

Literature critic and theologian Timothy J. Basselin consults O’Connor’s life and work to illustrate the profound connections existing between the theme of the grotesque and Christian theology. O’Connor’s own disability, Basselin argues, inspired a theology that leads readers toward greater recognition of God’s activity in a sinfully grotesque world. By combining disability studies, literary critique, and theological reflection, Basselin discovers a new vision for approaching the disabled, the grotesque, and the other in society. Flannery O’Connor reignites O’Connor’s own critiques of the modern affinity for perfection, self-sufficiency, and a clear separation between “good” and “bad.”

Flesh Made Word Cover

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Flesh Made Word

Medieval Women Mystics, Writing, and the Incarnation

Emily Holmes

For most of Christian history, the incarnation designated Christ as God made man. The obvious connection between God and the male body too often excluded women and the female body. In Flesh Made Word, Emily A. Holmes displays how medieval women writers expanded traditional theology through the incarnational practice of writing. Holmes draws inspiration for feminist theology from the writings of these medieval women mystics as well as French feminist philosophers of écriture féminine. The female body is then prioritized in feminist Christology, rather than circumvented. Flesh Made Word is a fresh, inclusive theology of the incarnation.

Freedom's Distant Shores Cover

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Freedom's Distant Shores

American Protestants and Post-Colonial Alliances with Africa

R. Drew Smith, Editor

This volume examines relations between U.S. Protestants and Africa since the end of colonial rule. It draws attention to shifting ecclesiastical and socio-political priorities, especially the decreased momentum of social justice advocacy and the growing missionary influence of churches emphasizing spiritual revival and personal prosperity. The book provides a thought-provoking assessment of U.S. Protestant involvements with Africa, and it proposes forms of engagement that build upon ecclesiastical dynamism within American and African contexts.

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