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The University of Akron Press


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The Search for the Ultimate Sink Cover

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The Search for the Ultimate Sink

Urban Pollution in Historical Perspective

By Joel A. Tarr

Whether it comes by air, by land, or by water, pollution has long plagued the American city. And for just as long, the question of how to deal with urban wastes has taxed the minds of scientists, engineers, and public officials - and the pocketbooks of ordinary citizens. For more than twenty years, Joel A. Tarr has written about the issues of urban pollution. In this collection of his essays, Professor Tarr surveys what technology has done to, and for, the environment of the American city since 1850. In studies ranging from the horse to the railroad, from infrastructure development to industrial and domestic pollution, from the Hudson River to the smokestacks of Pittsburgh, his constant theme is the tension between the production of wastes and the attempts to dispose of them or control them with minimal costs. The Search for the Ultimate Sink: Urban Pollution in Historical Perspective stands alone in its scholarly depth and scope. These essays explore not only the technical solutions to waste disposal, but also the policy issues involved in the trade-offs among public health, environmental quality, and the difficulties and costs of pollution control, and all this against the broader background of changes in civic and professional values. Any reader concerned with the interactive history of technology, the environment, and the American city will find in The Search for the Ultimate Sink an informative and compelling account of pollution problems from the past and a serious guide to urban policies for the future

Sex & Gender in Biomedicine Cover

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Sex & Gender in Biomedicine

Theories, Methodologies, Results

Ineke Klinge and Claudia Wiesemann, Editors

Sex and gender in biomedicine are innovative research concepts of theoretical and clinical medicine that enable a better understanding of health and disease, evidence-based knowledge, effective therapies, and better health outcomes for women and men. Gender medicine, which focuses on the impact of gender on human physiology, pathophysiology, and clinical features of diseases, stimulates new ways of doing research by considering sex and gender at all levels of investigation, from basic research into gene polymorphisms to health behavior. New research questions have been put forward that focus not on differences per se but on the developmnetal path of these differences. In this book, contributions from the fields of neuroscience, addiction research, and organ transplantation exemplify concepts, approaches, methods and results in the field of gender medicine.

Sexual Politics Cover

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Sexual Politics

The Gay Person in America Today

By Shannon Gilreath

Contemporary and controversial, Shannon Gilreath's Sexual Politics is an important update to the continuing debate over the place of gay people in American law, politics, and religion. Gilreath incisively navigates a number of complex issues, including the delicate balance between sexual privacy and public equality, the entwining of religion and U.S. law and politics, and gay marriage. He offers astute academic observation and depth of personal reflection to create an unmatched critique of gay people in American society. Ultimately, Gilreath argues for the further emergence of a gay and lesbian ethos of public attentiveness and the practice of "transformative politics," encompassing all those activities of gay and lesbian people: art, literature, sports, business, education, spirituality, and otherwise conventional forms of politics. Conversational and written with a compelling frankness, this book is vital for the serious legal and political student and the informed general reader alike.

Signaletics Cover

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Signaletics

by Emilia Phillips

Signaletics pits the measured against the immeasurable, the body against identity, and the political against the personal. With a defunct 19th-century body measurement system of criminal identification as a foundation, the poems move in and out of history, only to arrive at the immediate voice of a speaker, distraught about the death of a child brother, the remove of a father, and the estrangement of the personal with the politics of her country.

Spoken among the Trees Cover

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Spoken among the Trees

By Jeff Gundy

I am a native but not exactly at home, says the speaker near the end of "The Song of the Weed Witch," a declaration that echoes through Jeff Gundy's Spoken among the Trees. Gundy is restless in body and spirit-and in poetic form-a compulsive explorer through the flatlands of Ohio and Indiana. On one level, he seeks out "the green, astonishing world" abuzz with birds and water and wind through the trees. On another level, he looks to the immediate sensations of nature for spiritual clues, entrances into the realm beyond blue jays and pines. But, as he drolly says in "The Recovery of Imaginary Friends," "The guidebook of holy places lacks directions." Spoken among the Trees may hunger after moments of recognition and release, but not with the chill pallor of pietism. These poems mingle the romantic and ironic; they tell jokes and light up a scene with the flash of an incandescent phrase. Titles offer delights of their own, as in "June Report with Suppressed Geese and Sweatbees," or this collision of the sublime and the mundane, "Soul Travel at the Electric Brew, Goshen, Indiana" (with another statement of Gundy's restless theme: "If I could, I would live everywhere for a little while"). Spoken among the Trees is a book to live with, companionable even as it challenges easy beliefs and resists the overly earnest with a warm wit. Jeff Gundy's intricate and musical poems are wise in their humility, as probing as they are sweetly reasonable.

The Sunday Game Cover

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The Sunday Game

At the Dawn of Professional Football

By Keith McClellan

In the most complete and compelling account of the origins of professional football, The Sunday Game tells the stories of all the teams that played independent football in the small towns and industrial cities of the Midwest, from early in the twentieth century to the beginning of the National Football League shortly after the end of World War I. The foundations of what is now the most popular professional sport in America were laid by such teams as the Canton Bulldogs and the Hammond Clabbys, teams born out of civic pride and the enthusiasm of the blue-collar crowds who found, in the rough pleasure of the football field, the gritty equivalent of their own lives, a game they could cheer on Sunday afternoons, their only day free from work.

Teaching Ethics in Organ Transplantation Cover

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Teaching Ethics in Organ Transplantation

Cases and Movies

Silke Schicktanz, Claudia Wiesemann and Sabine Wöhlke, Editors

Organ transplantation allows modern surgeons to give "new life" to chronically ill patients. At the same time, the new opportunities raise ethical questions concerning human identity and the definition of the human body. These concerns do not play out the same in all cultures or in every situation. This collection of 30 case studies illustrates the range of global and local, ethical, social, and cultural problems associated with organ transplantation. The collection also provides a list of popular movies and websites to aid instructors and their students. This work is aimed at educators in medicine, health care, philosophy, and religious studies.

Thick Description and Fine Texture Cover

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Thick Description and Fine Texture

Studies in the History of Psychology

By David Baker

The essays contained in this volume offer a unique and personal perspective on the archival research process in the history of psychology. Celebrating the achievements of John A. Popplestone and Marion White McPherson, founders of the Archives of the History of American Psychology at The University of Akron in 1965, nine leading scholars describe the value, frustration, and satisfaction inherent in the archival process in the history of psychology. The essays provide valuable information on modern historiography in the history of psychology and the construction of historical narrative based on archival resources.

Thievery Cover

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Thievery

by Seth Abramson

Here is a book that is truly quietly deeply subtle. It appears to operate along the lines of here is how one thing follows another; it appears to rely on anticipated cause and effect to spring us forth from one fraction of a split second's thought to the next. There are many and then actions in this book. What follows comes as a surprise sometimes even when it shouldn't. For instance, at one poem's conclusion it says: An archer shoots. That's what an archer does. And this is astonishing. And then it is almost heartbreaking and then one must do a double take and then there is poetry.-Dara Wier In Thievery, his third and best book so far, Seth Abramson implicitly locates the source of the disaffection by which we are guided, not in the disasters of the twentieth century, which reconfirmed it, but in an unnameable and centuries-gone past. And by doing so he acknowledges that disaffection as the presence most familiar to us-indeed, its presence makes us familiar to each other: 'To be lost is to be connected / interminably.' These are grim and yet also startled poems, at home in a broken world and yet again and again and always surprised by its brokenness, and radiant with the sense that even the world in which one feels at home must be changed for the better. -Shane McCrae, Blood

Thomas Boyd Cover

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Thomas Boyd

Lost Author of the "Lost Generation"

By Brian Bruce

Mentored by F. Scott Fitzgerald and Sinclair Lewis and published under the renowned Scribner editor Maxwell Perkins, Thomas Boyd attained only modest success as a novelist and biographer. He is known most widely for his World War I novel Through the Wheat, which critics, praising its realistic depiction of war and battle, compared to the Red Badge of Courage. How does a writer like Boyd, with his prominent literary friends, political ideals, professional aspirations, complicated personal life, and early death, fall so easily into obscurity? In this first full biography of Thomas Boyd, Brian Bruce explores the events of Boyd's life and rescues him from the realm of insignificance. The 1920s were a magical and very attractive time for critics and historians of American literature. Hollywood and the radio would soon end the careers enjoyed by many writers, like Boyd, and the nature of the book market would change forever in ways that mark the novel's descent from a privileged position of cultural importance or influence. Richly based on correspondence, this book not only illuminates a forgotten writer, but also captures the publishing world at a mercurial peak.

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