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Hegel's Absolute Cover

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Hegel's Absolute

An Introduction to Reading the Phenomenology of Spirit

Reputed to be one of the most difficult yet rewarding works of philosophical literature, Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit has long been in need of an introduction for English readers. Without using jargon or technical terms, Donald Phillip Verene provides that introduction, guiding the reader through Hegel’s text as a whole and offering a way to grasp the major insights and sections of Hegel’s text without oversimplifying its narrative. A glossary of sixty of Hegel’s terms, discussed in both their original German and English equivalents, is included.

Heidegger and Aristotle Cover

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Heidegger and Aristotle

The Twofoldness of Being

Walter A. Brogan’s long-awaited book exploring Heidegger’s phenomenological reading of Aristotle’s philosophy places particular emphasis on the Physics, Metaphysics, Ethics, and Rhetoric. Controversial and challenging, Heidegger and Aristotle claims that it is Heidegger’s sustained thematic focus and insight that governs his overall reading of Aristotle, namely, that Aristotle, while attempting to remain faithful to the Parmenidean dictum regarding the oneness and unity of being, nevertheless thinks of being as twofold. Brogan offers a careful and detailed analysis of several of the most important of Heidegger’s treatises on Aristotle, including his assertion that Aristotle’s twofoldness of being has been ignored or misread in the traditional substance-oriented readings of Aristotle. This groundbreaking study contributes immensely to the scholarship of a growing community of ancient Greek scholars engaged in phenomenological approaches to the reading and understanding of Aristotle.

Heidegger and Language Cover

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Heidegger and Language

Edited by Jeffrey Powell

The essays collected in this volume take a new look at the role of language in the thought of Martin Heidegger to reassess its significance for contemporary philosophy. They consider such topics as Heidegger’s engagement with the Greeks, expression in language, poetry, the language of art and politics, and the question of truth. Heidegger left his unique stamp on language, giving it its own force and shape, especially with reference to concepts such as Dasein, understanding, and attunement, which have a distinctive place in his philosophy.

Heidegger and Plato Cover

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Heidegger and Plato

Toward Dialogue

Partenie and Rockmore

For Martin Heidegger the "fall" of philosophy into metaphysics begins with Plato. Thus, the relationship between the two philosophers is crucial to an understanding of Heidegger and, perhaps, even to the whole plausibility of postmodern critiques of metaphysics. It is also, as the essays in this volume attest, highly complex, and possibly founded on a questionable understanding of Plato.

Heidegger and Rhetoric Cover

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Heidegger and Rhetoric

Featuring essays by renowned scholars Michael J. Hyde, Theodore Kisiel, Mark Michalski, Otto Pöggeler, and Nancy S. Struever, this book provides the definitive treatment of Martin Heidegger’s 1924 lecture course, “Basic Concepts of Aristotelian Philosophy.” A deep and original interview with philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer, who attended the lecture course, is also included. Conducted over the course of three years, just prior to his death in 2002, the interview is Gadamer’s last major philosophical statement. By carefully considering this lecture course in the context of Heidegger’s life and work, the contributors compel us to reconsider the history and theory of rhetoric, as well as the history of twentieth-century continental philosophy.

Heidegger Change, The Cover

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Heidegger Change, The

On the Fantastic in Philosophy

Elaborates the author’s conception of plasticity by proposing a new way of thinking through Heidegger’s writings on change. After the readings of Jacques Derrida and Emmanuel Levinas and the broad disengagement from him in critical theory and humanities, the work of Martin Heidegger has generally not been the subject of inventive interpretations, especially not by thinkers developing their own body of concepts. In this work, one of France’s most inventive contemporary philosophers, Catherine Malabou, undertakes such a reading, arguing that behind Heidegger’s question of being lies another, one not yet addressed in continental philosophy: change. Treating under this deceptively simple heading the themes of exchange, substitution, migration, and metamorphosis, Malabou argues that Heidegger’s thought offers a radical theory of “ontico-ontological” transformability not found in any other thinker, and sketches its implications for a whole range of issues—capitalism, the gift, ethics, suffering, the biological, technology, imagination, and time—of central concern to the humanities. A major step in the series of texts in which Malabou elaborates a body of theory that starts from certain consequences of the philosophies of difference in order to go beyond them, The Heidegger Change is also an audacious work of theory for an age at risk of forgetting what it might take to do theory. A piece of writing in its own right, the text invents its own terminological and metaphoric lexicon while addressing its reader directly and urgently, and thus recalls the inventiveness and style of the classic theoretical texts of previous decades even as it stakes a route toward novel conceptual possibilities.

Heideggerian Marxism Cover

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Heideggerian Marxism

Herbert Marcuse

The Frankfurt School philosopher Herbert Marcuse (1898–1979) studied with Martin Heidegger at Freiburg University from 1928 to 1932 and completed a dissertation on Hegel’s theory of historicity under Heidegger’s supervision. During these years, Marcuse wrote a number of provocative philosophical essays experimenting with the possibilities of Heideggerian Marxism. For a time he believed that Heidegger’s ideas could revitalize Marxism, providing a dimension of experiential concreteness that was sorely lacking in the German Idealist tradition. Ultimately, two events deterred Marcuse from completing this program: the 1932 publication of Marx’s early economic and philosophical manuscripts, and Heidegger’s conversion to Nazism a year later. Heideggerian Marxism offers rich and fascinating testimony concerning the first attempt to fuse Marxism and existentialism.
 
These essays offer invaluable insight concerning Marcuse’s early philosophical evolution. They document one of the century’s most important Marxist philosophers attempting to respond to the “crisis of Marxism”: the failure of the European revolution coupled with the growing repression in the USSR. In response, Marcuse contrived an imaginative and original theoretical synthesis: “existential Marxism.”

Heidegger's Philosophy of Religion Cover

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Heidegger's Philosophy of Religion

From God to the Gods

By Ben Vedder

In various texts, Martin Heidegger speaks of god and the gods, but the question of how exactly Heidegger’s thought relates to theology and religion in a broad sense—and to God in a specific sense—remains unclear and in need of careful, philosophical excavation. Ben Vedder provides the first book-length study on Heidegger’s relation to the philosophy of religion, offering greater accessibility into an area that continues to fascinate philosophers, theologians, and all those interested in the philosophy of religion. Heidegger’s Philosophy of Religion: From God to the Gods deals intimately with hotly debated topics such as Heidegger’s interpretation of Saint Paul, Nietzsche and the death of God, ontotheology, and Heidegger’s discussion of the “last god,” taking into account the early, middle, and later texts of Heidegger. Significantly, Vedder draws heavily on Heidegger’s The Phenomenology of Religious Life, long available in German, but only recently available to English readers. Vedder describes the tension between religion and philosophy, on the one hand, and religion and poetic expression, on the other. If we grasp religion completely from a philosophical point of view, we tend to neutralize it; but if we conceive it in a simply poetic way, we tend to be philosophically indifferent to it. Vedder demonstrates how Heidegger speaks a “poetry of religion,” a description of humanity’s relationship to the divine, and why Heidegger’s thinking is ultimately a theological thinking. Clearly written and comprehensive in scope, Heidegger’s Philosophy of Religion: From God to the Gods represents a major step forward in Heidegger scholarship.

The Helmholtz Curves Cover

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The Helmholtz Curves

Tracing Lost Time

Henning Schmidgen, Translated by Nils F. Schott

This book reconstructs the emergence of the phenomenon of “lost time,” by engaging with two of the most significant time experts of the nineteenth century: the German physiologist Hermann von Helmholtz and the French writer Marcel Proust. _x000B__x000B_Its starting point is the archival discovery of curve images that Helmholtz produced in the context of pathbreaking experiments on the temporality of the nervous system in 1851. With a “frog drawing machine” Helmholtz established the temporal gap between stimulus and response that has remained a core issue in debates between neuroscientists and philosophers._x000B__x000B_When naming the recorded phenomena, Helmholtz introduced the term temps perdu, or lost time. Proust had excellent contacts with the biomedical world of late-nineteenth-century Paris, and he was familiar with this term and physiological tracing technologies behind it. Drawing on the machine philosophy of Deleuze, Schmidgen highlights the resemblance between the machinic assemblages and rhizomatic networks within which Helmholtz and Proust pursued their respective projects._x000B_

Hiddenness and Alterity Cover

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Hiddenness and Alterity

Philosophical and Literary Sightings of the Unseen

By James Richard Mensch

In spite of the injunction of philosophy to “know oneself,” we realize that we often act from motives that are obscure; we realize that we often do not fully understand how we feel or react. In short, we understand ourselves as not completely knowable. In attempting to know ourselves, we recognize that some aspects of ourselves—not unlike when we try to know others—are hidden from us. In Hiddenness and Alterity, Mensch seeks to define how the hidden shows itself. In pursuing this issue, Mensch also raises a parallel one regarding the nature and origin of our self-concealment. In developing the theme of the exceeding quality of selfhood, in which part of our self is truly “other,” Mensch presents a unified theory of alterity. He examines how our acknowledgment (and suppression) of the other shapes our thought in ethics, politics, epistemology and theology. Further, he demonstrates such “sightings of the unseen” through original readings of the major figures of the phenomenological movement: Husserl, Levinas, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Derrida, Nietzsche, Lacan and Fackenheim. He draws further on works by Herman Melville and Joseph Conrad to examine the inherent alterity of our flesh and its implications for the ways in which we relate to the world around us.

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