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Battling to the End

Conversations with Benoit Chantre

René Girard

In Battling to the End René Girard engages Carl von Clausewitz (1780-1831), the Prussian military theoretician who wrote On War. Clausewitz, who has been critiqued by military strategists, political scientists, and philosophers, famously postulated that "War is the continuation of politics by other means." He also seemed to believe that governments could constrain war.
     Clausewitz, a firsthand witness to the Napoleonic Wars, understood the nature of modern warfare. Far from controlling violence, politics follows in war's wake: the means of war have become its ends.
     René Girard shows us a Clausewitz who is a fascinated witness of history's acceleration. Haunted by the French-German conflict, Clausewitz clarifies more than anyone else the development that would ravage Europe. Battling to the End pushes aside the taboo that prevents us from seeing that the apocalypse has begun. Human violence is escaping our control; today it threatens the entire planet.

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Bearing Witness

Living with Ovarian Cancer

Bearing Witness is a collection of stories from women who went through the diagnosis of ovarian cancer, and treatment for it, only to find that the cancer recurred and any hope of recovery was gone. These women represent a spectrum of ages, ethnic backgrounds, marital circumstances, and professional experiences. From their stories we learn how each woman shapes the meaning of her life. Facing a life crisis can make one bitter and angry, but it can also provide the key to a thankful and generous spirit within.

Storytelling is an important art form present in many cultures: it is a way of processing life events, of searching for meaning, and of allowing teller and listener to wrestle with the message. It is a form of teaching and learning. For the women in Bearing Witness, stories are tangible legacies for family and friends and a chance to share their thoughts on living with the “glass half full.” They inspire the reader to reflect on life’s struggles and to find within themselves a sense of optimism, perhaps when they least expect to.

Kathryn Carter’s concluding essay places these stories in the context of contemporary discourses of illness and healing.

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Beasts of the Earth

Animals, Humans, and Disease

E. Fuller Torrey and Robert H. Yolken

Humans have lived in close proximity to other animals for thousands of years. Recent scientific studies have even shown that the presence of animals has a positive effect on our physical and mental health. People with pets typically have lower blood pressure, show fewer symptoms of depression, and tend to get more exercise.

But there is a darker side to the relationship between animals and humans. Animals are carriers of harmful infectious agents and the source of a myriad of human diseases. In recent years, the emergence of high-profile illnesses such as AIDS, SARS, West Nile virus, and bird flu has drawn much public attention, but as E. Fuller Torrey and Robert H. Yolken reveal, the transfer of deadly microbes from animals to humans is neither a new nor an easily avoided problem.

Beginning with the domestication of farm animals nearly 10,000 years ago, Beasts of the Earth traces the ways that human-animal contact has evolved over time. Today, shared living quarters, overlapping ecosystems, and experimental surgical practices where organs or tissues are transplanted from non-humans into humans continue to open new avenues for the transmission of infectious agents. Other changes in human behavior like increased air travel, automated food processing, and threats of bioterrorism are increasing the contagion factor by transporting microbes further distances and to larger populations in virtually no time at all.

While the authors urge that a better understanding of past diseases may help us lessen the severity of some illnesses, they also warn that, given our increasingly crowded planet, it is not a question of if but when and how often animal-transmitted diseases will pose serious challenges to human health in the future.

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Becoming Bicultural

Risk, Resilience, and Latino Youth

Paul Smokowski, Martica Bacallao

Although the United States has always been a nation of immigrants, the recent demographic shifts resulting in burgeoning young Latino and Asian populations have literally changed the face of the nation. This wave of massive immigration has led to a nationwide struggle with the need to become bicultural, a difficult and sometimes painful process of navigating between ethnic cultures.

While some Latino adolescents become alienated and turn to antisocial behavior and substance use, others go on to excel in school, have successful careers, and build healthy families. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data ranging from surveys to extensive interviews with immigrant families, Becoming Bicultural explores the individual psychology, family dynamics, and societal messages behind bicultural development and sheds light on the factors that lead to positive or negative consequences for immigrant youth. Paul R. Smokowski and Martica Bacallao illuminate how immigrant families, and American communities in general, become bicultural and use their bicultural skills to succeed in their new surroundings The volume concludes by offering a model for intervention with immigrant teens and their families which enhances their bicultural skills.

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Becoming Visible

by Jessica Catherine Lieberman

Becoming Visible brings together scholarly discussions of visibility and illness, photographs of an experience in treatment for Hodgkins lymphoma, and personal testimonial about that time. An artistic and academic contribution to the fields of trauma studies, disability studies and autopathography, this cancer journey reveals how the forces of art and narrative can contribute to social dynamics for change.

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Becoming Worthy Ancestors

Archive, public deliberation and identity in South Africa

Why should nations care for their archives and develop a sense of shared identity? And why should these processes take place in the public domain? How can nations speak about a shared sense of identity in pluralistic societies where individuals and groups have multiple identities? And how can such conversations be given relevance in public discussions of reconciliation and development in South Africa? These are the issues that this volume, based on the Public Conversations lecture series – an initiative of the Constitution of Public Intellectual Life Project at Wits University – proceeded from in 2006. Crosscurrents in contemporary South Africa have made the resumption of public debate to clarify the meanings of identity and citizenship and to develop an understanding of ‘archive’ even more urgent. The title comes from Weber’s point, elaborated on in the chapter by Benedict Anderson, that the future asks us to be worthy ancestors to those not yet born. In a charged environment of public dialogue, the editor hopes to inspire a rethinking of the essence of what it means to be a citizen of South Africa. Becoming Worthy Ancestors aims to make accessible the theoretically informed, sometimes highly academic work of its various contributors.

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Before and After Cancer Treatment

Heal Faster, Better, Stronger

Julie K. Silver, MD

A twelve-year cancer survivor and oncology rehabilitation specialist, Dr. Julie K. Silver wrote After Cancer Treatment to help others recover from the exhaustion and physical devastation that often follow treatment. This new edition of the book, retitled Before and After Cancer Treatment, describes improved therapies, better delivery of care, holistic care options, and energetics. In covering the benefits of prehabilitation strategies, which improve physical and emotional strength before beginning therapy, the book adds another dimension to the experience of cancer treatment. Dr. Silver fills this survivor-oriented book with exercise and diet recommendations as well as step-by-step instructions for fighting fatigue, monitoring mood, and overcoming setbacks. Readers are encouraged to set balanced goals, take time to heal, and consult both conventional and alternative medicine. Most people will live for many years after their initial cancer diagnosis—often cured or in remission. Some will live with cancer as a chronic condition. The goal is always to live life to the fullest, which means feeling as strong as possible—physically and emotionally. Dr. Silver recommends daring to dream again and preparing for the future. Wherever they are in their own journey with cancer, readers will find here a personal, practical, and powerful guide to recovery.

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Behavioral Science & Policy

Vol. 1 (2015) through current issue

Behavioral Science & Policy is an international, peer-reviewed journal that features short, accessible articles describing actionable policy applications of behavioral scientific research that serves the public interest. Articles submitted to BSP undergo a dual-review process. Leading Scholars from specific disciplinary areas review articles to assess their scientific rigor; at the same time, experts in relevant policy areas evaluate them for relevance and feasibility of implementation. Manuscripts that pass this dual-review are edited to ensure their accessibility to scientists, policy makers, and lay readers. BSP is not limited to a particular point of view or political ideology.

BSP is a publication of the Behavioral Science & Policy Association and the Brookings Institution Press.

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Behavioral Sciences and the Mass Media

Presents papers which were discussed at the Arden House Conference—a conference held to establish a working relationship between sociologists at the Russell Sage Foundation and journalists of the Graduate School of Journalism of Columbia University. Both behavioral science and journalism have for a long time been concerned with some of the same major national social problems—juvenile delinquency, urban problems, race and minority group relations, international tensions, and labor relations. These papers touch on some of the barriers to communication and point to possible ways of breaking through those barriers.

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Behavioral Therapy for Rural Substance Abusers

Carl Leukefeld, Theodore Godlaski, James Clark, Cynthia Brown, and Lon Hays

The problems and needs of rural substance abusers vary from those of abusers in urban areas. Accordingly, the means of treatment must acknowledge and address these differences. Despite this call for specialized care, no theoretically grounded therapy has yet been made available to rural patients.

Behavioral Therapy for Rural Substance Abusers, developed and piloted over three years by University of Kentucky faculty and staff and substance abuse counselors in rural eastern Kentucky, provides a model for effective treatment for this segment of the population. A two-phase outpatient treatment, this approach combines group and individual sessions in an environment that is both comfortable and useful for the client.

The success of this method lies in its regional approach to therapy. Rather than using role-playing techniques to examine old behaviors, therapy is designed around storytelling activities. Rural patients respond more positively to such time-honored traditions and thus become active participants in their own treatment.

This manual offers a clear and well-constructed guide through the strategies of Structured Behavioral Outpatient Rural Therapy (SBORT). Supplemented with illustrations, sample exercises, and case studies, Behavioral Therapy for Rural Substance Abusers is a vital tool in meeting the treatment needs of an otherwise ignored rural population.

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