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Literature > Latin American and Caribbean Literature

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Results 71-80 of 113

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On Latinidad Cover

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On Latinidad

U.S. Latino Literature and the Construction of Ethnicity

Marta Caminero-Santangelo

This is the first book to address head-on the question of how Latino/a literature wrestles with the pan-ethnic and trans-racial implications of the "Latino" label.

Refusing to take latinidad (Latino-ness) for granted, Marta Caminero-Santangelo lays the groundwork for a sophisticated understanding of the various manifestations of "Latino" identity. She examines texts by prominent Chicano/a, Dominican American, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American writers--including Julia Alvarez, Cristina García, Achy Obejas, Piri Thomas, and Ana Castillo--and concludes that a pre-existing "group" does not exist. The author instead argues that much recent Latino/a literature presents a vision of tentative, forged solidarities in the service of particular and sometimes even local struggles. She shows that even magical realism can figure as a threat to collectivity, rather than as a signifier of it, because magical connections--to nature, between characters, and to Latin American origins--can undermine efforts at solidarity and empowerment.

In the author's close reading of both fictional and cultural narratives, she suggests the possibility that Latino identity may be even more elastic than the authors under question recognize.

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One Hundred Years after Tomorrow

Brazilian Women's Fiction in the Twentieth Century

Edited and translated by Darlene J. Sadlier

"Appearing for the first time in English, these stories express the anguish and courage of women from their different classes and regions as they recognize their common restlessness and forge a new consciousness."  -- Booklist

"... provocative... Although not all the pieces are outwardly political, there is a political edge to the book; the tone of the stories is bleak as they tell of Brazilian women's struggles with government, society, men and their own private demons. Sadlier's able translations retain a distinctive voice and style for each writer." -- Publishers Weekly

"Sadlier... has done a service to students of Comparative Literature and Women's Studies as well as to general readers who sincerely want to know what literature of quality is being written in that all-too-rarely studied Portuguese language of Brazil."  -- Revista de Estudios Hispanicos

"The pieces... convey... the evolution in the consciousness of the writers, their sense of themselves, and their place in society as well as the changes affecting Brazil's political climate and society at large during this century."  -- Review of Contemporary Fiction

"A superb addition to the increasing number of anthologies dedicated to Brazilian literature." -- Choice

"A must for any modern literary collection." -- WLW Journal

Women writers have revolutionized Brazilian literature, and this impressive collection will provide English readers with a window on this revolution. These twenty previously untranslated selections by some of Brazil's most important writers illustrate the remarkable power of women's voices and the important contributions they have made to twentieth-century literature.

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Orientalismo en el Modernismo Hispanoamericano

by Araceli Tinajero

Araceli Tinajero's Orientalismo en el modernismo hispanoamericano falls within the present revisionist trend with respect to Spanish American modernism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. The text's uniqueness stems from its focus on allusions to images, artifacts, and thought from the East—primarily Japan—found in central and peripheral writings within the Spanish American movement.

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Packaged Vacations

Tourism Development in the Spanish Caribbean

Evan R. Ward

Evan Ward's compelling study provides analytical insight into the evolution of today's principal tourism destinations in the Spanish Caribbean. Packaged Vacations examines the political and economic forces that led to the creation of resorts in Puerto Rico, Mexico, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic, as well as the impact tourism has had on local environments, economies, and cultures.

By comparing and contrasting a number of case studies, Ward reveals how historical, political, architectural, planning, and environmental factors led to the unique identities of resorts throughout the region. He also demonstrates that the growth of tourism in the region into a major economic force is driven as much by local and European interests as by those of American corporations.

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Painting Modernism

Ivan A. Schulman

Studies the influence of the plastic arts on the major writers of Latin American modernism.

Patrick Chamoiseau Cover

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Patrick Chamoiseau

A Critical Introduction

Wendy Knepper

Performing Women and Modern Literary Culture in Latin America Cover

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Performing Women and Modern Literary Culture in Latin America

Intervening Acts

By Vicky Unruh

Women have always been the muses who inspire the creativity of men, but how do women become the creators of art themselves? This was the challenge faced by Latin American women who aspired to write in the 1920s and 1930s. Though women's roles were opening up during this time, women writers were not automatically welcomed by the Latin American literary avant-gardes, whose male members viewed women's participation in tertulias (literary gatherings) and publications as uncommon and even forbidding. How did Latin American women writers, celebrated by male writers as the “New Eve” but distrusted as fellow creators, find their intellectual homes and fashion their artistic missions? In this innovative book, Vicky Unruh explores how women writers of the vanguard period often gained access to literary life as public performers. Using a novel, interdisciplinary synthesis of performance theory, she shows how Latin American women's work in theatre, poetry declamation, song, dance, oration, witty display, and bold journalistic self-portraiture helped them craft their public personas as writers and shaped their singular forms of analytical thought, cultural critique, and literary style. Concentrating on eleven writers from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela, Unruh demonstrates that, as these women identified themselves as instigators of change rather than as passive muses, they unleashed penetrating critiques of projects for social and artistic modernization in Latin America.

The Poetics of Ethnography in Martinican Narratives Cover

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The Poetics of Ethnography in Martinican Narratives

Exploring the Self and the Environment

Christina Kullberg

Drawing on narratives from Martinique by Aimé Césaire, Édouard Glissant, Ina Césaire, and Patrick Chamoiseau, among others, Christina Kullberg shows how these writers turn to ethnography—even as they critique it—as an exploration and expression of the self. They acknowledge its tradition as a colonial discourse and a study of others, but they also argue for ethnography’s advantage in connecting subjectivity to the outside world. Further, they find that ethnography offers the possibility of capturing within the hybrid culture of the Caribbean an emergent self that nonetheless remains attached to its collective history and environment. Rather than claiming to be able to represent the culture they also feel alienated from, these writers explore the relationships between themselves, the community, and the environment.

Although Kullberg’s focus is on Martinique, her work opens up possibilities for intertextual readings and comparative studies of writers from every linguistic region in the Caribbean—not only francophone but also Hispanic and anglophone. In addition, her interdisciplinary approach extends the reach of her work beyond postcolonial and literary studies to anthropology and ecocriticism.

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Properties of Modernity

Romantic Spain, Modern Europe, and the Legacies of Empire

Michael Iarocci

Michael Iarocci traces the ways in which Spain went from being central to European history and identity during the early modern period to being marginalized and displaced by England, France, and Germany during the Romantic period. He points out that it has long been an unspoken assumption tainting much of literary criticism that Spain did not have a strong Romantic movement even though Spain itself had come to be viewed by the "new" Europe as the location of all that was romantic. Through a close study of Cadalso, Saavedra, and Larra, Iarocci argues that Spanish writers were intensely concerned with the same issues taken up by more famous Romantics and that the ways in which they address these issues provides us with a richer notion, not only of Spain, but of all of Europe.

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Race, Romance, and Rebellion

Literatures of the Americas in the Nineteenth Century

Colleen C. O'Brien

As in many literatures of the New World grappling with issues of slavery and freedom, stories of racial insurrection frequently coincided with stories of cross-racial romance in nineteenth-century U.S. print culture. Colleen O’Brien explores how authors such as Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Livermore, and Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda imagined the expansion of race and gender-based rights as a hemispheric affair, drawing together the United States with Africa, Cuba, and other parts of the Caribbean. Placing less familiar women writers in conversation with their more famous contemporaries—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Lydia Maria Child—O’Brien traces the transnational progress of freedom through the antebellum cultural fascination with cross-racial relationships and insurrections. Her book mines a variety of sources—fiction, political rhetoric, popular journalism, race science, and biblical treatises—to reveal a common concern: a future in which romance and rebellion engender radical social and political transformation.

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