We are unable to display your institutional affiliation without JavaScript turned on.
Shibboleth

Shibboleth authentication is only available to registered institutions.

Project MUSE

Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Browse Results For:

Literature > Children's Literature

1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 57

:
:
Best Jewish books for Children and Teens Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Best Jewish books for Children and Teens

A JPS Guide

Authored by Linda R. Silver MLS

So many books, so little time! Where do you start? With this book: Linda Silver’s guide to the most notable books for young readers. Here are a top librarian’s picks of the best in writing, illustration, reader appeal, and authentically Jewish content in picture books, fiction and non-fiction, for early childhood through the high school years. You’ll find the classics like K’tonton and the All-of-a-Kind Family books, right on to Terrible Things, Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, and today’s bestsellers, along with hundreds of others. Chapters are organized by subject and entries within each include a succinct description of the book and author, and Silver’s own insights on what makes it worth reading. There are title, subject, author, and illustrator indexes, title-grouping by reading level, and lists of award winners. A wonderful reference for parents, grandparents, teachers, librarians—and, of course, the kids so dear to them.

Bloody Murder Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Bloody Murder

The Homicide Tradition in Children's Literature

Michelle Ann Abate

Given the long-standing belief that children ought to be shielded from disturbing life events, it is surprising to see how many stories for kids involve killing. Bloody Murder is the first full-length critical study of this pervasive theme of murder in children’s literature. Through rereadings of well-known works, such as Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, and The Outsiders, Michelle Ann Abate explores how acts of homicide connect these works with an array of previously unforeseen literary, social, political, and cultural issues. Topics range from changes in the America criminal justice system, the rise of forensic science, and shifting attitudes about crime and punishment to changing cultural conceptions about the nature of evil and the different ways that murder has been popularly presented and socially interpreted. Bloody Murder adds to the body of inquiry into America's ongoing fascination with violent crime. Abate argues that when narratives for children are considered along with other representations of homicide in the United States, they not only provide a more accurate portrait of the range, depth, and variety of crime literature, they also alter existing ideas about the meaning of violence, the emotional appeal of fear, and the cultural construction of death and dying.

 Cover
Access Restricted This search result is for a Journal

Bookbird: A Journal of International Children's Literature

Vol. 46 (2008) through current issue

Published by the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), Bookbird communicates new ideas to the whole community of readers interested in children's books, publishing work on any topic in the field of international children's literature.

Bookwomen Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Bookwomen

Creating an Empire in Children’s Book Publishing, 1919–1939

Jacalyn Eddy

The most comprehensive account of the women who, as librarians, editors, and founders of the Horn Book, shaped the modern children's book industry between 1919 and 1939. The lives of Anne Carroll Moore, Alice Jordan, Louise Seaman Bechtel, May Massee, Bertha Mahony Miller, and Elinor Whitney Field open up for readers the world of female professionalization. What emerges is a vivid illustration of some of the cultural debates of the time, including concerns about "good reading" for children and about women's negotiations between domesticity and participation in the paid labor force and the costs and payoffs of professional life.

Published in collaboration among the University of Wisconsin Press, the Center for the History of Print Culture in Modern America (a joint program of the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the Wisconsin Historical Society), and the University of Wisconsin–Madison General Library System Office of Scholarly Communication.

 Cover
Access Restricted This search result is for a Journal

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Vol. 59 (2005) through current issue

The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books is devoted to the review of current books for children. Providing concise summaries and critical evaluations, this invaluable resource assists readers with questions regarding the ever-evolving children's literature field. Each issue of Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books includes expert reviews by a world-renowned staff. These reviews give an in-depth look at selected book's content, reading level, strengths and weaknesses, quality of the format, as well as suggestions for circular use. The Bulletin also includes: Bulletin Blue Ribbons- a selection of the year's most distinguished titles, The Big Picture- a monthly editorial that looks at titles and trends, Professional Connections- a section featuring bibliographies, reviews of new professional books, and abstracts of research articles, and a Subject and Use Index- an index allows readers to easily locate information by referring to subjects, curricular use, and genres.

Bullying in Irish Education Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Bullying in Irish Education

Edited by Mona O’Moore and Paul Stevens

School bullying is receiving increasing attention as a phenomenon which is present in all schools. Despite previous books on the topic, bullying continues to thrive, become more sophisticated and pose serious problems for school populations in both primary and post-primary sectors.This book will be the first definitive review of bullying in Irish education written by researchers and practitioners working in the field. The appeal of this book is twofold. Firstly it explores bulling from different perspectives within education namely pupils, teachers and principals. Secondly it is research based but the concerns, shortcomings and challenges which bullying presents in the educational environment are explored and realistic strategies and support strategies are proposed.Given the keen interest in bullying internationally this book provides a comparative text clearing indicating research and practice in Ireland.

 Cover
Access Restricted This search result is for a Journal

Children's Literature

Vol. 1 (1972) through current issue

Children's Literature is the annual publication of the Modern Language Association Division on Children's Literature and the Children's Literature Association. Encouraging serious scholarship and research, Children's Literature publishes theoretically based articles that address key issues in the field. Each volume contains eight to ten articles, five to seven review essays, and an index. Some volumes also include a Varia section of shorter essays. Filled every year with outstanding articles and essays, Children's Literature has an international reputation as the pre-eminent publication in the field.

 Cover
Access Restricted This search result is for a Journal

Children's Literature Association Quarterly

Vol. 1 (1976) through current issue

With a new look and a new editorial staff, the Children's Literature Association Quarterly continues its tradition of publishing first-rate scholarship in Children's Literature Studies. Recent articles include "The Narnian Schism: Reading the Christian Subtext as Other in the Children's Stories of C. S. Lewis," "Dusty, the Dyke Barbie," and "Playing Empire: Children's Parlor Games, Home Theatricals, and Improvisational Play." Each issue features an editorial introduction, juried articles about research and scholarship in children's literature, and book reviews. The Quarterly is available to members of the Children's Literature Association as a part of membership.

Children's Literature of the Harlem Renaissance Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Children's Literature of the Harlem Renaissance

Katharine Capshaw Smith

The Harlem Renaissance, the period associated with the flowering of the arts in Harlem, inaugurated a tradition of African American children's literature, for the movement's central writers made youth both their subject and audience. W.E.B. Du Bois, Carter G. Woodson, Langston Hughes, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, and other Harlem Renaissance figures took an impassioned interest in the literary models offered to children, believing that the "New Negro" would ultimately arise from black youth. As a result, African American children's literature became a crucial medium through which a disparate community forged bonds of cultural, economic, and aesthetic solidarity. Kate Capshaw Smith explores the period's vigorous exchange about the nature and identity of black childhood and uncovers the networks of African American philosophers, community activists, schoolteachers, and literary artists who worked together to transmit black history and culture to the next generation.

Child-Sized History Cover

Access Restricted This search result is for a Book

Child-Sized History

Fictions of the Past in U.S. Classrooms

Sara L. Schwebel

For more than three decades, the same children’s historical novels have been taught across the United States. Honored for their literary quality and appreciated for their alignment with social studies curricula, the books have flourished as schools moved from whole-language to phonics and from student-centered learning to standardized testing. Books like Johnny Tremain, The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Island of the Blue Dolphins, and Roll of Thunder, Hear Me Cry stimulate children’s imagination, transporting them into the American past and projecting them into an American future. As works of historical interpretation, however, many are startlingly out of step with current historiography and social sensibilities, especially with regard to race. Unlike textbooks, which are replaced on regular cycles and subjected to public tugs-of-war between the left and right, historical novels have simply—and quietly—endured. Taken individually, many present troubling interpretations of the American past. But embraced collectively, this classroom canon provides a rare pedagogical opportunity: it captures a range of interpretive voices across time and place, a kind of “people’s history” far removed from today’s state-sanctioned textbooks. Teachers who employ historical novels in the classroom can help students recognize and interpret historical narrative as the product of research, analytical perspective, and the politics of the time. In doing so, they sensitize students to the ways in which the past is put to moral and ideological uses in the present. Featuring separate chapters on American Indians, war, and slavery, Child-Sized History tracks the changes in how young readers are taught to conceptualize history and the American nation.

1 2 3 4 NEXT next

Results 1-10 of 57

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (51)
  • (6)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access