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Literature > American Literature > Hispanic American Literature

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Women and Power in Argentine Literature Cover

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Women and Power in Argentine Literature

Stories, Interviews, and Critical Essays

By Gwendolyn Díaz

The astonishing talent of Argentine women writers belies the struggles they have faced—not merely as overlooked authors, but as women of conviction facing oppression. The patriarchal pressures of the Perón years, the terror of the Dirty War, and, more recently, the economic collapse that gripped the nation in 2001 created such repressive conditions that some writers, such as Luisa Valenzuela, left the country for long periods. Not surprisingly, power has become an inescapable theme in Argentine women’s fiction, and this collection shows how the dynamics of power capture not only the political world but also the personal one. Whether their characters are politicians and peasants, torturers and victims, parents and children, or lovers male and female, each writer explores the effects of power as it is exercised by or against women. The fifteen writers chosen for Women and Power in Argentine Literature include famous names such as Valenzuela, as well as authors anthologized for the first time, most notably María Kodama, widow of Jorge Luis Borges. Each chapter begins with a “verbal portrait,” editor Gwendolyn Díaz’s personal impression of the author at ease, formed through hours of conversation and interviews. A biographical essay and critical commentary follow, with emphasis on the work included in this anthology. Díaz’s interviews, translated from Spanish, and finally the stories themselves—only three of which have been previously published in English—complete the chapters. The extraordinary depth of these chapters reflects the nuanced, often controversial portrayals of power observed by Argentine women writers. Inspiring as well as insightful, Women and Power in Argentine Literature is ultimately about women who, in Díaz’s words, “choose to speak their truth regardless of the consequences.”

Women of Thunder Cover

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Women of Thunder

Jerry Craven

In an attempt to regain a youthful innocence, Vietnam Veteran Tom Seal returns to El Tigrito, Venezuela, hoping to find his childhood friend, Rosa Rojas, nearly two decades after Tom’s family returned to the United States.

Tom longs to recreate an adventure he and Rosa shared when they were young and to return to the “Eden of their childhood” they had stumbled upon as children.

But the ensuing eighteen years have changed not only the jungle, but the two friends as well. Departing for the jungle in the rainy season, Tom and Rosa try to regain the same joy and happiness they had experienced so many years ago, but instead they are beset by howler monkeys, flesh-eating butterflies, the Jungle People, and perhaps most dangerous of all—the ghosts of their own painful pasts.

Wonder and Exile in the New World Cover

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Wonder and Exile in the New World

By Alex Nava

In Wonder and Exile in the New World, Alex Nava explores the border regions in-between wonder and exile particularly in relation to the New World. It traces the preoccupation with the concept of wonder in the history of the Americas beginning with the first European encounters, and goes on to investigate later representations in the Baroque age, and ultimately into the twentieth century with the emergence of so-called magical realism. In telling the story of wonder in the New World, special attention is given to the part it played in the history of violence and exile, either as a force that supported and reinforced the conquest, or as a voice of resistance and decolonization. Focusing on the work of New World explorers, writers, and poets—and their literary descendants, Nava finds that wonder and exile have been two of the most significant metaphors within Latin American cultural, literary, and religious representations. Beginning with the period of the Conquest, especially with Cabeza de Vaca and Las Casas, and continuing through the Baroque with Cervantes and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and into the twentieth century with Alejo Carpentier and Miguel Ángel Asturias, Nava produces a historical study of Latin American narrative in which religious and theological perspectives figure prominently.

A World among These Islands Cover

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A World among These Islands

Essays on Literature, Race, and National Identity in Antillean America

Roberto Marquez

Caribbean literature and culture have all too often been viewed in fragmented terms, without attention to the broader commonalities of the region. In this collection of essays written over many years, Roberto Márquez offers a more encompassing vision, one that respects the individual traditions of particular locales, languages, and cultures but also sees the larger themes that bind the area's literary heritage and history. Márquez begins by making the case for a genuinely Caribbean literary criticism, one that moves beyond the colonial history of fragmentation and isolation and the critical insularity of more conventional approaches. His pan-Caribbean perspective provides a point of departure for the scrutiny of the evolving dramas of race, nationality, nation-building, and cultural articulation in the region. Márquez then focuses specifically on Puerto Rico—its literary and socio—historical experience, the particularities of its "New Creole" incarnations, and the effects of waves of migration to the United States. In the final section of the book, he discusses writers and cultural figures from the other Spanish, Anglophone, and Francophone territories and the ways in which they engage or reflect the defining themes of literature, race, and national identity in Antillean America.

Writing Off the Hyphen Cover

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Writing Off the Hyphen

New Perspectives on the Literature of the Puerto Rican Diaspora

edited by Jose L. Torres-Padilla and Carmen Haydee Rivera

Your Brain on Latino Comics Cover

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Your Brain on Latino Comics

From Gus Arriola to Los Bros Hernandez

By Frederick Luis Aldama

Though the field of comic book studies has burgeoned in recent years, Latino characters and creators have received little attention. Putting the spotlight on this vibrant segment, Your Brain on Latino Comics illuminates the world of superheroes Firebird, Vibe, and the new Blue Beetle while also examining the effects on readers who are challenged to envision such worlds. Exploring mainstream companies such as Marvel and DC as well as rising stars from other segments of the industry, Frederick Aldama provides a new reading of race, ethnicity, and the relatively new storytelling medium of comics themselves. Overview chapters cover the evolution of Latino influences in comics, innovations, and representations of women, demonstrating Latino transcendence of many mainstream techniques. The author then probes the rich and complex ways in which such artists affect the cognitive and emotional responses of readers as they imagine past, present, and future worlds. Twenty-one interviews with Latino comic book and comic strip authors and artists, including Laura Molina, Frank Espinosa, and Rafael Navarro, complete the study, yielding captivating commentary on the current state of the trade, cultural perceptions, and the intentions of creative individuals who shape their readers in powerful ways.

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