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Innovative Practices for Teaching Sign Language Interpreters Cover

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Innovative Practices for Teaching Sign Language Interpreters

Cynthia B. Roy, Editor

Researchers now understand interpreting as an active process between two languages and cultures, with social interaction, sociolinguistics, and discourse analysis as more appropriate theoretical frameworks. Roy’s penetrating new book acts upon these new insights by presenting six dynamic teaching practices to help interpreters achieve the highest level of skill. Elizabeth Winston and Christine Monikowski begin by explaining discourse mapping to enable students to develop a mental picture of a message’s meaning and the relationships of context, form, and content. Kyra Pollitt discusses critical discourse analysis, to reveal some of the cultural influences that shape a speaker’s language use. Melanie Metzger describes preparing role-plays so that students learn to effectively switch back and forth between languages, manage features such as overlap, and make relevant contributions to interaction, such as indicating the source of an utterance. Jeffrey Davis illustrates the translation skills that form the basis for teaching consecutive and simultaneous interpreting to help students understand the intended meaning of the source message, and also the manner in which listeners understand it. Rico Peterson demonstrates the use of recall protocols, which can be used to teach metacognitive skills and to assess the student’s sign language comprehension. Finally, Janice Humphrey details the use of graduation portfolios, a valuable assessment tool used by faculty to determine a student’s level of competency. These imaginative techniques in Innovative Practices promise gains in sign language interpreting that will benefit teachers, students, and clients alike in the very near future.

International Perspectives on Sign Language Interpreting Cover

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International Perspectives on Sign Language Interpreting

Jemina Napier, Editor

From the moment the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) was established in 2005, an overwhelming wave of requests from around the world arrived seeking information and resources for educating and training interpreters. This new collection provides those answers with an international overview on interpreter training from experts in Austria, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Fiji, Finland, Ireland, Japan, Kenya, Kosovo, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Scotland, Sweden, and the United States. Whether from income-rich or income-poor countries, the 31 contributors presented here provide insights on how sign language interpreter training has developed in each nation, and also how trainers have dealt with the difficulties that they encountered. Many of the contributors relate the movement away from ad hoc short courses sponsored by Deaf communities. They mark the transition from the early struggles of trainers against the stigmatization of sign languages to full-time degree programs in institutions of higher education funded by their governments. Others investigate how culture, religion, politics, and legislation affect the nurturing of professional sign language interpreters, and they address the challenges of extending training opportunities nationally through the use of new technology. Together, these diverse perspectives offer a deeper understanding and comparison of interpreter training issues that could benefit the programs in every nation.

Interpreter Education in the Digital Age Cover

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Interpreter Education in the Digital Age

Innovation, Access, and Change

This collection brings together innovative research and approaches for blended learning using digital technology in interpreter education for signed and spoken languages. Volume editors Jemina Napier and Suzanne Ehrlich call upon the expertise of 21 experts, including themselves, to report on the current technology in applying digital enhancement to interpreter education in Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Belgium, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Divided into three parts, Innovation, Change, and Community Engagement, this study focuses on the technology itself, rather than how technology enhances curriculum, delivery, or resources. Initiatives described in this collection range from the implementation of on-demand interpreting using iPad technology; creating personalized, small-group, multidimensional models suited to digital media for 160 languages; introducing students to interpreting in a 3D world by through an IVY virtual environment; applying gaming principles to interpreter education; assessing the amenability of the digital pen in the hybrid mode of interpreting; development of multimedia teaching and learning objects to support blended delivery of Deaf; developing multimedia content for both open access and structured interpreter education environments; to preparing Interpreting Students for Interactions in social media forums, and more. Interpreter Education in the Digital Age provides a context for the application of technologies in interpreter education from an international viewpoint across languages and modalities.

Interpreters as Diplomats Cover

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Interpreters as Diplomats

A Diplomatic History of the Role of Interpreters in World Politics

Ruth A. Roland

This book looks at the role played throughout history by translators and interpreters in international relations. It considers how political linguistics function and have functioned throughout history. It fills a gap left by political historians, who seldom ask themselves in what language the political negotiations they describe were conducted.

Interpreting in Legal Settings Cover

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Interpreting in Legal Settings

Debra Russell and Sandra Hale, Editors

The work of interpreters in legal settings, whether they are spoken or signed language interpreters, is filled with enormous complexity and challenges. This engrossing volume presents six, data-based studies from both signed and spoken language interpreter researchers on a diverse range of topics, theoretical underpinnings, and research methodologies. In the first chapter, Ruth Morris analyzes the 1987 trial of Ivan (John) Demjanjuk in Jerusalem, and reveals that what might appear to be ethical breaches often were no more than courtroom dynamics, such as noise and overlapping conversation. Waltraud Kolb and Franz Pöchhacker studied 14 asylum appeals in Austria and found that interpreters frequently aligned themselves with the adjudicators. Bente Jacobsen presents a case study of a Danish-English interpreter whose discourse practices expose her attempts to maintain, mitigate, or enhance face among the participants. In the fourth chapter, Jemina Napier and David Spencer investigate the effectiveness of interpreting in an Australian courtroom to determine if deaf citizens should participate as jurors. Debra Russell analyzed the effectiveness of preparing sign language interpreter teams for trials in Canada and found mixed results. The final chapter presents Zubaidah Ibrahim-Bell’s research on the inadequate legal services in Malaysia due to the fact that only seven sign interpreters are available. Taken together, these studies point to a “coming of age” of the field of legal interpreting as a research discipline, making Interpreting in Legal Settings an invaluable, one-of-a-kind acquisition.

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Interpreting in Multilingual, Multicultural Contexts

Rachel Locker McKee and Jeffrey E. Davis, Editors

Nineteen international interpreting authorities contribute their research and findings to Interpreting in Multilingual, Multicultural Contexts, the seventh volume in the Studies in Interpretation series. These experts probe the complex nature of interpreted interaction involving Deaf and hearing people of diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds. They also analyze the contextualized interpreting practices and considerations that transpire from this diversity. In three parts, this trenchant collection shows how Deaf and hearing people use language in fluctuating ways to connect with each other. The chapters in Part 1C Expanding Frontiers: ASL-English-Spanish Interpreting in the United States C consider sign language interpreting at the border between Baja California and the state; trilingual video relay service (VRS) interpreting; and constructing a valid, reliable trilingual interpreting testing instrument. Part 2 C Mediating Indigenous Voices C explores how to construct roles in a Mori Deaf trilingual context; considerations for interpreting signed languages of American Indian Communities; and interpreting for indigenous Deaf clients in far north Queensland, Australia. In the final section, Part 3 C Globalizing: Interpreting in International Contexts C protocols for interpreting in multilingual international conferences are analyzed. The last chapter describes the arduousness of sign language interpreting in multilingual, international settings. It acts as a fitting conclusion to this examination of the challenges to the sociolinguistic repertoire of interpreters mediating across multiplex combinations of culture and language.

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Interpreting the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal

A Sociopolitical Analysis

Kayoko Takeda

In order to ensure its absolute authority, the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal (1946–1948), the Japanese counterpart of the Nuremberg Trial, adopted a three-tier structure for its interpreting: Japanese nationals interpreted the proceedings, second-generation Japanese-Americans monitored the interpreting, and Caucasian U.S. military officers arbitrated the disputes. The first extensive study on the subject in English, this book explores the historical and political contexts of the trial as well as the social and cultural backgrounds of the linguists through trial transcripts in English and Japanese, archival documents and recordings, and interviews with those who were involved in the interpreting. In addition to a detailed account of the interpreting, the book examines the reasons for the three-tier system, how the interpreting procedures were established over the course of the trial, and the unique difficulties faced by the Japanese-American monitors. This original case study of the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal illuminates how complex issues such as trust, power, control and race affect interpreting at international tribunals in times of conflict.

Investigations in Healthcare Interpreting Cover

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Investigations in Healthcare Interpreting

In healthcare, the accuracy of interpretation is the most critical component of safe and effective communication between providers and patients in medical settings characterized by language and cultural barriers. Although medical education should prepare healthcare providers for common issues they will face in practice, their training often does not adequately teach the communication skills necessary to work with patients who use interpreters. This new volume in the Studies in Interpretation series addresses critical topics in communication in healthcare settings around the world. Investigations in Healthcare Interpreting consists of ten chapters contributed by a broad array of international scholars. They address topics as diverse as the co-construction of medical conversation between interlocutors, healthcare interpretation in Ireland, and how interpreters make requests for clarification in their work. Using a variety of methodological approaches including ethnography, questionnaires, observation, and diary accounts, these scholars report on trials of simultaneous video interpreting in Austrian hospitals; direct, interpreted, and translated healthcare information for Australian deaf people; the interpretation of medical interview questions from English into ASL; and specialized psychological/psychiatric diagnostic tests for deaf and hard of hearing clients. Researchers, practitioners, and students, as well as all healthcare professionals, will find this volume to be an invaluable resource.

Jouer la traduction Cover

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Jouer la traduction

Théâtre et hétérolinguisme au Canada francophone

Nicole Nolette

Contrairement au théâtre québécois, où le bilinguisme est mis en scène de manière intermittente, celui qui provient de ses marges fait du bilinguisme une pratique courante. Les écrivains franco-canadiens – ceux de l’Ouest canadien, de l’Ontario et de l’Acadie – racontent et montent différentes histoires de diglossie et de bilinguisme et jouent le jeu de la littérature en y démultipliant la traduction dans la forme comme dans le contenu. 

L’ « hétérolinguisme » – c’est-à-dire l’inscription de la variabilité linguistique – de ces pièces de théâtre franco-canadiennes est le plus souvent compréhensible pour les lecteurs et les publics bilingues locaux. Néanmoins, la diffusion de telles pièces et, par ricochet, leur légitimation auprès des métropoles théâtrales canadiennes au fonctionnement surtout unilingue, auront à passer par des traductions en supplément à celles auxquelles leurs jeux bilingues leur permettent déjà de s’adonner. Il est possible que, pour atteindre la légitimation par les institutions dominantes grâce à la traduction, « les cultures de l’exiguïté sacrifient ce qu’elles possèdent de plus radicalement créateur1 », c’est-à-dire l’inscription du traduisible et l’hétérolinguisme ludique. De l’autre, parmi les traductions additionnelles qui découlent de ces processus de diffusion et de légitimation, la réinscription supplémentaire ou ludique du traduisible pourrait être tout aussi radicalement créatrice que son inscription première. 

Une analyse percutante, actuelle, de la circulation, en traduction, de la production théâtrale de l’Ouest canadien francophone, de l’Ontario français et de l’Acadie, qui prend des allures de terrain de jeu pour le français et l’anglais. 

La Formation à la traduction professionnelle Cover

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La Formation à la traduction professionnelle

Sous la direction de Geneviève Mareschale, Louise Brunette, Zélie Guével et Egan Valentine

L’industrie de la traduction connaît depuis cinquante ans un essor considérable. L’accroissement des échanges internationaux et, plus récemment, le développement de l’Internet et des technologies de l’information et de la communication on fait de la traduction une activité spécialisée, de plus en plus technologisée, requérant un apprentissage propre. Parallèlement, le traducteur est devenu un professionnel reconnue, respecté et recherché. Comment forme-t-on aujourd’hui un « traducteur professionnel » ? Quelles connaissances et compétences doit-il maîtriser ? Comment s’adapte-t-il à l’évolution de sa discipline ? Comment les enseignements sont-ils structurés de façon à optimiser son apprentissage ? Voilà quelques-unes des questions auxquelles cet ouvrage apporte une réponse ou encore un éclairage. Tributaire d’une profession exigeante, en constante évolution, la formation des traducteurs est loin d’être statique. Souplesse, adaptabilité, innovation, vision, tel est l’esprit dans lequel les auteurs ayant participé à ce collectif abordent cette formation et en explorent les diverses facettes. Par leur variété et leur complémentarité, les textes ici réunis offrent un portrait représentatif des composantes actuelles de la formation des traducteurs et des approches pédagogiques les plus récentes.

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