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Europe et traduction

Textes réunis par Michel Ballard

La traduction est un phénomène central pour l’Europe telle qu’elle est en train de se construire : elle assure les échanges entre états sans qu’une langue commune donne l’impression d’une hégémonie quelconque ou d’un abandon des identités nationales. Cet attachement à la notion d’identité tout en ménageant les échanges culturels est une constante de l’histoire européenne et ces échanges passées, fondés sur la traduction, font que la construction de l’Europe ne se réduit pas à la création d’une entité économique et politique : elle possède une dimension humaine et culturelle spécifique, qui lui donne son âme. Ce colloque a abordé ces deux aspects du rôle de la traduction en Europe : dans le passé et aujourd’hui comme facteur de découverte mutuelle et ferment culturel ; de manière plus spécifique aujourd’hui comme facteur d’équilibre et instrument de communication au sein des institutions. Le colloque a rassemblé des spécialistes de nombreux pays européens ou observateurs jetant un regard sur l’Europe. Les textes partent de la traduction en Irlande au Moyen Age pour aboutir aux traducteurs allemands de Roumanie au XIXe siècle. La dernière partie du colloque tente de faire le point sur divers aspects de la recherche en matière de traductologie ainsi que la formation des traducteurs.

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Evolving Paradigms in Interpreter Education

Elizabeth A. Winston and Christine Monikowski, Editors

This volume brings together a cadre of world-renowned interpreting educators and researchers who conduct a rich exploration of paradigms, both old and new, in interpreter education. They review existing research, explicate past and current practices, and call for a fresh look at the roots of interpreter education in anticipation of the future. Expert commentary accompanies each chapter to provide a starting point for reflection on and discussion of the growing needs in this discipline. Volume coeditor Christine Monikowski begins by considering how interpreter educators can balance their responsibilities of teaching, practice, and research, accompanied by commentary about the capacity to “academize” what has been thought of as a semi-profession. Helen Tebble shares research on medical interpreting from an applied linguistic perspective. Terry Janzen follows with the impact of linguistic theory on interpretation research methodology. Barbara Shaffer discusses how interpreting theory shapes the interpreter’s role. Elizabeth A. Winston, also a volume coeditor, rounds out this innovative collection with her chapter on infusing evidence-based teaching practices into interpreting education. Noted interpreter educators and researchers also provide an international range of insights in this collection, including Rico Peterson, Beppie vanden Bogaerde, Karen Bontempo, Ian Mason, Ester Leung, David Quinto-Pozos, Lorraine Leeson, Jemina Napier, Christopher Stone, Debra Russell, and Claudia Angelelli.

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Exiguity

Reflections on the Margins of Literature

For the past four centuries, five major languages have dominated Western literature. This domination has excluded or rendered marginal all other literatures — has, in effect, diminished literary diversity and endangered the existence of the literature of “smaller” cultures.

In an illuminating defence for their preservation, François Paré reflects on the diversity of cultures and languages in the world and on the fantastic richness of “smaller” literatures. He offers us memorable samples of this diversity and, in his original and thought-provoking style, tantalizes us with critical musings on the complexity of “marginal” literature and the regenerative power it can offer. Exiguity: Reflections on the Margins of Literature reflects Paré’s deep involvement with the development and preservation of minority cultures in Canada.

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The Fate of Bonté III

Allain Poissant

Bonté III was five years old. A cow at that age is at her prime. Prime is an accounting term. A dairy farm is a business and must be managed as such. From this perspective, Bonté III’s days were numbered. Numbered is not an empty word. She had been a good representative of her breed. A cow, after all, has no need to try to be a cow. Her life is that of a cow: a predetermined cycle that is easily reflected on a balance sheet. She eats. She drinks. She ruminates. She urinates. She defecates. All this has a cost. She ovulates. She bears a calf. She gives birth. She produces milk. All this brings money. [...] Tit for tat. The only thing left to do for Bonté III was to call the butcher.

The Fate of Bonté III is a story of love and loneliness with colourful characters, a reflection on life and the vital need to be useful to someone or to something.

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From Topic Boundaries to Omission

New Research on Interpretation

Melanie Metzger, Steven Collins, Valerie Dively, and Risa Shaw , Editors

This new collection examines several facets of signed language interpreting. Claudia Angelelli’s study confirms that conference, courtroom, and medical interpretation can no longer be seen as a two-party conversation with an “invisible” interpreter, but as a three-party conversation in which the interpreter plays an active role. Laura M. Sanheim defines different turn-taking elements in a medical setting as two overlapping conversations, one between the patient and the interpreter and the other between the interpreter and the medical professional. In her analysis of discourse at a Deaf revival service, Mary Ann Richey demonstrates how Deaf presenters and audiences interact even in formal settings, creating special challenges for interpreters. Jemina Napier shares her findings on the nature and occurrence of omissions by interpreters in Australian Sign Language and English exchanges. Elizabeth Winston and Christine Monikowski describe different strategies used by interpreters to indicate topic shifts when interpreting into American Sign Language and when transliterating. The study concludes with Bruce Sofinski’s analysis of nonmanual elements used by interpreters in sign language transliteration.

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Gustav Shpet's Contribution to Philosophy and Cutlural Theory

Edited by Galin Tihanov

This book offers original research by leading scholars from the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Russia, which covers the central areas of Shpet's work on phenomenology, philosophy of language, cultural theory, and aesthetics and takes forward the current state of knowledge and debates on his contribution to these fields of enquiry.

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The Hermes Complex

Philosophical Reflections on Translation

Charles Le Blanc

When Hermes handed over to Apollo his finest invention, the lyre, in exchange for promotion to the status of messenger of the gods, he relinquished the creativity that gave life to his words.
The trade-off proved frustrating: Hermes chafed under the obligation to deliver the ideas and words of others and resorted to all manner of ruses in order to assert his presence in the messages he transmitted. His theorizing descendants, too, allow their pretentions to creatorship to interfere with the actual business of reinventing originals in another language.
Just as the Hermes of old delighted in leading the traveller astray, so his descendants lead their acolytes, through thickets of jargon, into labyrinths of eloquence without substance.
Charles Le Blanc possesses the philosophical tools to dismantle this empty eloquence: he exposes the inconsistencies, internal contradictions, misreadings, and misunderstandings rife in so much of the current academic discourse en translation, and traces the failings of this discourse back to its roots in the anguish of having traded authentic creativity for mere status.

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Hungry Ghost

by Anne Waldman

This pocket-sized paperback is one of the twenty-two titles published for 2015 Hong Kong International Poetry Nights. The theme of IPHHK2015 is “Poetry and Conflict”. 21 international poets from 18 different places are invited to participate in recitations, symposia and sharing sessions of the Poetry Nights. A recitation focusing on 10 local Hong Kong poets, “Hong Kong Cantonese Poetry Night” is included. This collection seeks to make accessible the best of contemporary international poetry with outstanding translations.

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The Image Hunter

by Chen Li

This pocket-sized paperback is one of the twenty-two titles published for 2015 Hong Kong International Poetry Nights. The theme of IPHHK2015 is “Poetry and Conflict”. 21 international poets from 18 different places are invited to participate in recitations, symposia and sharing sessions of the Poetry Nights. A recitation focusing on 10 local Hong Kong poets, “Hong Kong Cantonese Poetry Night” is included. This collection seeks to make accessible the best of contemporary international poetry with outstanding translations.

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In Our Hands

Educating Healthcare Interpreters

Laurie A. Swabey and Karen Malcolm, Editors

Deaf Americans have identified healthcare as the most difficult setting in which to obtain a qualified interpreter. Yet, relatively little attention has been given to developing evidence-based resources and a standardized body of knowledge to educate healthcare interpreters. In Our Hands: Educating Healthcare Interpreters addresses these concerns by delineating the best practices for preparing interpreters to facilitate full access for deaf people in healthcare settings. The first section of this volume begins with developing domains and competencies toward a teaching methodology for medical and mental health interpreters. The next chapter describes a discourse approach that relies on analyzing actual transcripts and recordings to train healthcare interpreters. Other chapters feature a model mental health interpreter training program in Alabama, using a Demand-Control Schema for experiential learning, the risk of vicarious trauma to interpreters, online educational opportunities, and interpreting for deaf health care professionals. The second section offers four perspectives on education, including healthcare literacy of the clients; the education of Deaf interpreters; the development of standards for spoken-language healthcare interpreters; and the perspectives of healthcare interpreter educators in Europe. The range and depth of In Our Hands takes significant strides in presenting educational opportunities that can enhance the critical services provided by healthcare interpreters to deaf clients.

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