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Archives of Authority

Empire, Culture, and the Cold War

Andrew N. Rubin

Combining literary, cultural, and political history, and based on extensive archival research, including previously unseen FBI and CIA documents, Archives of Authority argues that cultural politics--specifically America's often covert patronage of the arts--played a highly important role in the transfer of imperial authority from Britain to the United States during a critical period after World War II. Andrew Rubin argues that this transfer reshaped the postwar literary space and he shows how, during this time, new and efficient modes of cultural transmission, replication, and travel--such as radio and rapidly and globally circulated journals--completely transformed the position occupied by the postwar writer and the role of world literature.

Rubin demonstrates that the nearly instantaneous translation of texts by George Orwell, Thomas Mann, W. H. Auden, Richard Wright, Mary McCarthy, and Albert Camus, among others, into interrelated journals that were sponsored by organizations such as the CIA's Congress for Cultural Freedom and circulated around the world effectively reshaped writers, critics, and intellectuals into easily recognizable, transnational figures. Their work formed a new canon of world literature that was celebrated in the United States and supposedly represented the best of contemporary thought, while less politically attractive authors were ignored or even demonized. This championing and demonizing of writers occurred in the name of anti-Communism--the new, transatlantic "civilizing mission" through which postwar cultural and literary authority emerged.

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Aristocratic Redoubt

The Austro-Hungarian Foreign Office on the Eve of the First World War

by William Godsey

Aristocratic Redoubt: The Austro-Hungarian Foreign Office on the Eve of the First World War is a study of the nobility who served in the foreign office prior to World War I. Following the lead of historians who are reexamining pre-industrial elites in England and Germany, Godsey deals with such facets of aristocratic life as education, wealth, religion, and ethnicity.

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Army of Francis Joseph

by Gunther Rothenberg

Rothenberg's work in the first analytical, full, length study of the army of Francis Joseph throughout its history from 1815-1918.

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The Army of Truth

Selected Poems

Henrik Wergeland

One of Norway’s most celebrated literary figures of the nineteenth century, Henrik Wergeland worked tirelessly for the civil rights of Jews in Norway. He used the words and structure of his poetry to enliven the ideals of truth, freedom, and equality. This translated volume, containing several of Wergeland’s most prominent poems, beautifully encapsulates the compelling force of his message, allowing its enduring influence to benefit a wider contemporary audience.

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Art and human rights

Contemporary Asian contexts

Caroline Turner

Contemporary Asian art has had a remarkable impact on global art practice, in addition to serving as a record of the region’s history from decolonisation to the present. Many Asian artists are deeply concerned about what it means to be human and to contribute to the development of a sustainable society, as well as having a sustained commitment to making art. This book, written at the start of the ‘Asian century’, focuses on the contexts and conditions which have helped to shape both art practice and postcolonial society in the region. One of the first surveys of contemporary Asian art, it uses case studies of key artists to discuss the work in relation to issues of human rights, social and environmental well-being and creativity. As such, it makes an important contribution to studies of contemporary Asian art and art history.

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The art of the possible

Politics and governance in modern British history, 1885–1997: Essays in memory of Duncan Tanner

Chris Williams

This volume explores some of the major transitions, opportunities and false dawns of modern British political history. It engages with the scholarly legacy of Professor Duncan Tanner (1958–2010) whose work was focused on the political process and on politics in government. Chronologically its span runs from the first general election to be conducted under the terms of the Third Reform Act through to the 1997 referenda in favour of devolved assemblies in Scotland and Wales. This was the period in which British politicians most obviously addressed a mass, British-wide electorate, seeking national approval for policies and programmes to be enacted on a UK-wide basis. Aimed at scholars and students of modern British history this volume will also interest the general reader who wishes to get to grips with some of the latest thinking about British politics.

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Arthur Horner

Vol 1 1894-1944

by Nina Fishman

Arthur Horner (1894-1968) was a British miners’ leader from the 1926 general strike to his retirement as general secretary of the National Union of Mineworkers in 1959. During his life he played a crucial role in the fight for a national mineworkers union, and in the development of the National Coal Board. He was a champion of the Republicans in Spain and was imprisoned several times for his political views. Coming from a working-class family, and being forced through poverty to leave school at the age of eleven, Horner devoted his life to the struggle for socialism. He was a committed communist, but was also able to exercise effective leadership in a major trade union committed to social democratic principles, playing a key role in the social democratic settlement after the Second World War. This biography, in two volumes, documents the contribution Horner made to trade unionism, and to the creation of a social democratic commonwealth in postwar Britain.

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Arthur Horner

Vol 2 1944-1968

by Nina Fishman

Arthur Horner (1894-1968) was a British miners’ leader from the 1926 general strike to his retirement as general secretary of the National Union of Mineworkers in 1959. During his life he played a crucial role in the fight for a national mineworkers union, and in the development of the National Coal Board. He was a champion of the Republicans in Spain and was imprisoned several times for his political views. Coming from a working-class family, and being forced through poverty to leave school at the age of eleven, Horner devoted his life to the struggle for socialism. He was a committed communist, but was also able to exercise effective leadership in a major trade union committed to social democratic principles, playing a key role in the social democratic settlement after the Second World War. This biography, in two volumes, documents the contribution Horner made to trade unionism, and to the creation of a social democratic commonwealth in postwar Britain.

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An Artisan Intellectual

James Carter and the Rise of Modern Britain, 1792-1853

by Christopher Ferguson

Mostly forgotten by history, James Carter (1792-1853) was an English tailor and writer, whose life and ideas offer a unique means for comprehending the revolutions at work in British society at the beginning of the nineteenth century, including industrialization, urbanization, heightened migration, rising literacy, and expanding print media, all of which transformed the nature of everyday life for ordinary Britons like Carter.

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As If God Existed

Religion and Liberty in the History of Italy

Maurizio Viroli

Religion and liberty are often thought to be mutual enemies: if religion has a natural ally, it is authoritarianism--not republicanism or democracy. But in this book, Maurizio Viroli, a leading historian of republican political thought, challenges this conventional wisdom. He argues that political emancipation and the defense of political liberty have always required the self-sacrifice of people with religious sentiments and a religious devotion to liberty. This is particularly the case when liberty is threatened by authoritarianism: the staunchest defenders of liberty are those who feel a deeply religious commitment to it.

Viroli makes his case by reconstructing, for the first time, the history of the Italian "religion of liberty," covering its entire span but focusing on three key examples of political emancipation: the free republics of the late Middle Ages, the Risorgimento of the nineteenth century, and the antifascist Resistenza of the twentieth century. In each example, Viroli shows, a religious spirit that regarded moral and political liberty as the highest goods of human life was fundamental to establishing and preserving liberty. He also shows that when this religious sentiment has been corrupted or suffocated, Italians have lost their liberty.

This book makes a powerful and provocative contribution to today's debates about the compatibility of religion and republicanism.

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