Browse Results For:

History > U.S. History > 20th Century

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NEXT next

Results 31-40 of 1209

:
:
restricted access This search result is for a Book

Ambiguous Borderlands

Shadow Imagery in Cold War American Culture

Erik Mortenson

The image of the shadow in mid-twentieth-century America appeared across a variety of genres and media including poetry, pulp fiction, photography, and film. Drawing on an extensive framework that ranges from Cold War cultural histories to theorizations of psychoanalysis and the Gothic, Erik Mortenson argues that shadow imagery in 1950s and 1960s American culture not only reflected the anxiety and ambiguity of the times but also offered an imaginative space for artists to challenge the binary rhetoric associated with the Cold War.
 
After contextualizing the postwar use of shadow imagery in the wake of the atomic bomb, Ambiguous Borderlands looks at shadows in print works, detailing the reemergence of the pulp fiction crime fighter “the Shadow” in the late-1950s writings of Sylvia Plath, Amiri Baraka, and Jack Kerouac. Using Freudian and Jungian conceptions of the unconscious, Mortenson then discusses Kerouac’s and Allen Ginsberg’s shared dream of a “shrouded stranger” and how this dream shaped their Beat aesthetic. Turning to the visual, Mortenson examines the dehumanizing effect of shadow imagery in the Cold War photography of Robert Frank, William Klein, and Ralph Eugene Meatyard.  Mortenson concludes with an investigation of the use of chiaroscuro in 1950s film noir and the popular television series The Twilight Zone, further detailing how the complexities of Cold War society were mirrored across these media in the ubiquitous imagery of light and dark.
 
From comics to movies, Beats to bombs, Ambiguous Borderlands provides a novel understanding of the Cold War cultural context through its analysis of the image of the shadow in midcentury media. Its interdisciplinary approach, ambitious subject matter, and diverse theoretical framing make it essential reading for anyone interested in American literary and popular culture during the mid-twentieth century.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Ambition, Competition, and Electoral Reform

The Politics of Congressional Elections Across Time

Jamie L. Carson and Jason M. Roberts

In Ambition, Competition, and Electoral Reform, Jamie L. Carson and Jason M. Roberts present an original study of U.S. congressional elections and electoral institutions for 1872-1944 from a contemporary political science perspective. Using data on late

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Ambition, Pragmatism, and Party

A Political Biography of Gerald R. Ford

A beautifully written biography of Gerald Ford sheds new light on a man who was much more than an accidental president.  Sailor, athlete, prosecutor, politician, and ultimately unlikely commander-in-chief, Ford’s story is one of the entire American century, and Kaufman tells it brilliantly.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Ambivalent Embrace

Jewish Upward Mobility in Postwar America

Rachel Kranson

This new cultural history of Jewish life and identity in the United States after World War II focuses on the process of upward mobility. Rachel Kranson challenges the common notion that most American Jews unambivalently celebrated their generally strong growth in economic status and social acceptance during the booming postwar era. In fact, a significant number of Jewish religious, artistic, and intellectual leaders worried about the ascent of large numbers of Jews into the American middle class.

Kranson reveals that many Jews were deeply concerned that their lives—affected by rapidly changing political pressures, gender roles, and religious practices—were becoming dangerously disconnected from authentic Jewish values. She uncovers how Jewish leaders delivered jeremiads that warned affluent Jews of hypocrisy and associated "good" Jews with poverty, even at times romanticizing life in America's immigrant slums and Europe's impoverished shtetls. Jewish leaders, while not trying to hinder economic development, thus cemented an ongoing identification with the Jewish heritage of poverty and marginality as a crucial element in an American Jewish ethos.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

America in the Age of the Titans

The Progressive Era and World War I

Sean Dennis Cashman

Detailing the events of the Progressive Era and World War I (1901-20), America in the Age of the Titans is the only interdisciplinary history covering this period currently available. The book contains the results of research into primary sources an drecent scholarship with an emphases on leading personalities and anecdotes about them. Sean Dennis Cashman's sequesl to America in the Gilded Age gives special attention to industry and inventions, and social and cultural history. He covers developments in science, technology, and industry; the Progressive movement and the presidencies of Theodore Roosevelt, immigration, the new woman, and labor, including the Industrial Workers of the World and the Great Red Scare; the transportation and communications revolution in radio and motion pictures; the cultural contribuation of artists, architects, and creatice writers; and America's foreign policies across the world. Written in a lively, accessible style with over sixty illustrations, this book is an excellent introduction to these momentous years. It provides an assessment of the contributions of the titans - political, scientific, and industrial.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

America in the Forties

Ronald Allen Goldberg

America in the Forties is a readable and concise narrative that tells the story of the forties in the United States. The book argues that the forties were an important period in American life, shaped by charismatic, brilliant, and sometimes controversial leaders. It traces the entire decade from the first stirrings of war in a nation consumed by the Great Depression to fights with Europe and Japan and through the start of the Cold War and the dawn of the atomic age.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

America in the Nineties

Nina Esperanza Serrianne

This book is a survey treatment of the 1990s. The trajectory of the narrative follows from the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This book seeks to give a voice to historically marginalized communities, while providing an overview of the 1990s. The analysis includes examinations of: the end of the 1980s, America’s War in the Gulf, Bush’s domestic agenda; The 1992 Campaign, Clinton’s domestic agenda; The United States and genocide; globalization; science and technology; pop culture; race relations; LGBT and women’s right; and the scandals of the Clinton Administration. The book strikes the balance between providing an analysis of the 1990s, while providing the reader with basic key information about the decade. This book is one of the first of its kind to examine the whole decade and while providing an analysis on a multitude of subjects.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

America in the Sixties

John Robert Greene

Greene sketches the well-known players of the period—John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and Betty Friedan—bringing each to life with subtle detail. He introduces the reader to lesser-known incidents of the decade and offers fresh and persuasive insights on many of its watershed events. Greene argues that the civil rights movement began in 1955 following the death of Emmett Till; that many accomplishments credited to Kennedy were based upon myth, not historical fact, and that his presidency was far from successful; that each of the movements of the period—civil rights, students, antiwar, ethnic nationalism—were started by young intellectuals and eventually driven to failure by activists who had different goals in mind; and that the "counterculture," which has been glorified in today’s media as a band of rock-singing hippies, had its roots in some of the most provocative social thinking of the postwar period. Greene chronicles the decade in a thematic manner, devoting individual chapters to such subjects as the legacy of the fifties, the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, the civil rights movements, and the war in Vietnam. Combining an engrossing narrative with intelligent analysis, America in the Sixties enriches our understanding of that pivotal era.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

America in the Teens

Andrew J. Dunar

In the latest addition to the America in the Twentieth Century series, Dunar provides a sweeping account of the twentieth century’s second decade. Beginning with the social, political, and economic circumstances in the United States in 1910, America in the Teens presents the themes and pivotal events that shaped America during this tumultuous period. The election of 1912, World War I, social change in the late Progressive Era, the influence of war on women and minorities, and changes in the motion picture industry are among the many is-sues covered in this eminently readable, concise text.

Dunar traces the development of a vibrant society during a time of enormous change and explores the ways in which Americans reacted. World War I brought our nation to the forefront of the world’s great powers but also provoked divisions that Americans would confront through the twentieth century and beyond: racial tensions, immigration issues, and labor-management disputes. At the same time, there were progressive triumphs: women earned the right to vote; American industry made great strides, symbolized by the mass production of Henry Ford’s automobiles; and American cinema and jazz enjoyed international acclaim. Combining an engrossing narrative with intelligent analysis, America in the Teens enriches our understanding of that critical era.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

America in the Thirties

John Olszowka, Marnie M. Sullivan, Brian R. Sheridan, and Dennis Hickey

As the newest addition to the America in the Twentieth Century series, this book explores the complexity of America in what is considered its darkest era of the century. The decade stood in stark contrast to the carefree, happy-go-lucky days of the Roaring Twenties when prosperity appeared endless. The Stock Market Crash in October 1929 and the economic collapse it unleashed threatened the very foundations of America’s economic, political, and social institutions. The ecological disaster produced by the Dust Bowl ravaging the Great Plains only added to the suffering and misery. Yet the decade was not just one mired in complete disorder. The 1930s were also a vibrant period of innovation, transformation, and in some cases, even optimism. Politics, beginning with Herbert Hoover and continuing with Franklin Roosevelt, underwent a fundamental transformation, ushering in an activist state and firmly establishing the idea that through prudent federal policies, it was not only possible to orchestrate an economic recovery but also to prevent future economic downturns. Workers, African Americans, ethnic Americans, and women responded to the era’s challenges through their newfound political voice in Roosevelt’s New Deal and through the institutions and communities they created to alleviate their suffering. Culturally, the 1930s also proved to be a boon to America, ushering in the Golden Age of Hollywood as millions of Americans looked to movies as a momentary refuge from their daily plight. For all the hardship and despair of the 1930s, there was also a vitality that defined the decade.

previous PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NEXT next

Results 31-40 of 1209

:
:

Return to Browse All on Project MUSE

Research Areas

Content Type

  • (1209)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access