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Living with Strangers Cover

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Living with Strangers

The Nineteenth-Century Sioux and the Canadian-American Borderlands

David G. McCrady

The story of the Sioux who moved into the Canadian-American borderlands in the later years of the nineteenth century is told in its entirety for the first time here. Previous histories have been divided by national boundaries and have focused on the famous personages involved, paying scant attention to how Native peoples on both sides of the border reacted to the arrival of the Sioux. Using material from archives across North America, Canadian and American government documents, Lakota winter counts, and oral history, Living with Strangers reveals how the nineteenth-century Sioux were a people of the borderlands.

The Sioux made great tactical use of the Canada–United States boundary. They traded with the Métis of Canada—often in contraband goods such as arms and ammunition—and tried to get better prices from European traders by drawing the Hudson’s Bay Company into competition with American traders. They opened negotiations with both Canadian and American officials to determine which government would accord them better treatment, and they used the boundary as a shield in times of warfare with the United States. Until now, the Canadian-American borderlands and the people who live there have remained a blind spot in Canadian and American nationalist historiographies. Living with Strangers takes readers beyond the traditional dichotomy of the Canadian and the American West and reveals significant and previously unknown strands in Sioux history.

Louis Riel and the Creation of Modern Canada Cover

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Louis Riel and the Creation of Modern Canada

Mythic Discourse and the Postcolonial State

Jennifer Reid

Reid examines Riel's religious background, the mythic significance that has consciously been ascribed to him, and how these elements combined to influence Canada's search for a national identity. Reid's study provides a framework for rethinking the geopolitical significance of the modern Canadian state, the historic role of Confederation in establishing the country's collective self-image, and the narrative space through which Riel's voice speaks to these issues.

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Metropolitan Natures

Environmental Histories of Montreal

Edited by Stéphane Castonguay and Michèle Dagenais

One of the oldest metropolitan areas in North America, Montreal has evolved from a remote fur-trading post in New France into an international center for services and technology. A city and an island located at the confluence of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence Rivers; it is uniquely situated to serve as an international port while also providing rail access to the Canadian interior. The historic capital of the Province of Canada, and once Canada’s foremost metropolis, Montreal has a multifaceted cultural heritage drawn from European and North American influences. Thanks to its rich past, the city offers an ideal setting for the study of an evolving urban environment. Metropolitan Natures presents original histories of the diverse environments that constitute Montreal and it region. It explores the agricultural and industrial transformation of the metropolitan area, the interaction of city and hinterland, and the interplay of humans and nature. The fourteen chapters cover a wide range of issues, from landscape representations during the colonial era to urban encroachments on the Kahnawake Mohawk reservation on the south shore of the island, from the 1918–1920 Spanish flu epidemic and its ensuing human environmental modifications to the urban sprawl characteristic of North America during the postwar period. Situations that politicize the environment are discussed as well, including the economic and class dynamics of flood relief, highways built to facilitate recreational access for the middle class, power-generating facilities that invade pristine rural areas, and the elitist environmental hegemony of fox hunting. Additional chapters examine human attempts to control the urban environment through street planning, waterway construction, water supply, and sewerage.

Myth, Symbol, and Colonial Encounter Cover

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Myth, Symbol, and Colonial Encounter

British and Mi'kmaq in Acadia, 1700-1867

Jennifer Reid

From the time of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, people of British origin have shared the area of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, traditionally called Acadia, with Eastern Canada's Algonkian-speaking peoples, the Mi'kmaq. This historical analysis of colonial Acadia from the perspective of symbolic and mythic existence will be useful to those interested in Canadian history, native Canadian history, religion in Canada, and history of religion.

Néologie canadienne de Jacques Viger Cover

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Néologie canadienne de Jacques Viger

Manuscrits de 1810

Jacques Viger

Le manuscrit de Jacques Viger vient combler un vide dans la lexicographie canadienne-française du début du XIXe siècle. Journaliste, militaire, fonctionnaire, « historiomane » et archiviste infatigable, Viger fut le premier maire de Montréal ainsi que le premier président de la Société Saint-Jean Baptiste. Néologie canadienne est le seul lexique que nous ayons de cette période. Écrit après celui du Père Potier, mais bien avant que ne s’établisse une tradition lexicographique au Québec, ce manuscrit est un témoignage authentique et unique de la langue du début du XIXe siècle. Suzelle Blais rend enfin accessible aux linguistes -- et au chercheurs de diverses disciplines -- un document de toute première importance pour l’histoire du français au Québec.

National Plots Cover

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National Plots

Historical Fiction and Changing Ideas of Canada

Fiction that reconsiders, challenges, reshapes, and/or upholds national narratives of history has long been an integral aspect of Canadian literature. Works by writers of historical fiction (from early practitioners such as John Richardson to contemporary figures such as Alice Munro and George Elliott Clarke) propose new views and understandings of Canadian history and individual relationships to it. Critical evaluation of these works sheds light on the complexity of these depictions.

The contributors in National Plots: Historical Fiction and Changing Ideas of Canada critically examine texts with subject matter ranging from George Vancouver’s west coast explorations to the eradication of the Beothuk in Newfoundland. Reflecting diverse methodologies and theoretical approaches, the essays seek to explicate depictions of “the historical” in individual texts and to explore larger questions relating to historical fiction as a genre with complex and divergent political motivations and goals. Although the topics of the essays vary widely, as a whole the collection raises (and answers) questions about the significance of the roles historical fiction has played within Canadian culture for nearly two centuries.

Nationalisme et protection sociale Cover

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Nationalisme et protection sociale

Daniel Béland

Les études sur le nationalisme et les politiques sociales se sont multipliées au cours des dernières années, mais peu d’entre elles ont abordé les interactions entre ces deux phénomènes. Alors que les chercheurs intéressés par la citoyenneté sociale font parfois référence à ces interactions, ils se penchent rarement sur la notion de nationalisme. Pour leur part, les spécialistes du nationalisme traitent rarement de protection sociale, préférant approfondir les questions de langue, de culture, d’ethnicité et de religion. Ainsi, ce livre explore, dans une perspective historique et comparative, la nature des liens entre nationalisme et protection sociale. Au plan théorique, l’analyse jette un éclairage neuf sur une question plus générale : la relation entre la formation de l’identité, la territorialité et la protection sociale. Bien que ce livre fasse référence à plusieurs pays, il scrute particulièrement les cas du Canada (Québec), du Royaume-Uni (Écosse) et de la Belgique (Flandre) – des États multiculturels où se trouvent d’importants mouvements nationalistes. L’ouvrage examine également les politiques sociales de ces pays en regard de celles d’autres États plus monolithiques comme les États-Unis et l’Allemagne, afin d’élargir la perspective comparative entre nationalisme et protection sociale.

On All Frontiers Cover

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On All Frontiers

Four Centuries of Canadian Nursing

Editors Christina Bates, Dianne Dodd and Nicole Rousseau

Nursing has a long and varied history in Canada. Since the founding of the first hospital by the Augustine nuns in 1637, nurses have contributed greatly to Canadians' quality of life.

On All Frontiers is a comprehensive history of Canadian nursing. Editors Christina Bates, Dianne Dodd, and Nicole Rousseau have brought together a vast body of research into one volume. Authored by leading experts, the chapters and vignettes form an overview of the history of Canadian nursing to date.

From the midwives of early Canada to urban public health nurses, from remote outposts to the battlefields of Europe, On All Frontiers documents the hardships, challenges, and achievements of Canadian nurses. Richly illustrated with archival photographs, it will prove essential to scholars of Canadian health care history.

Ontario Boys Cover

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Ontario Boys

Masculinity and the Idea of Boyhood in Postwar Ontario, 1945–1960

Ontario Boys explores the preoccupation with boyhood in Ontario during the immediate postwar period, 1945–1960. It argues that a traditional version of boyhood was being rejuvenated in response to a population fraught with uncertainty, and suffering from insecurity, instability, and gender anxiety brought on by depression-era and wartime disruptions in marital, familial, and labour relations, as well as mass migration, rapid postwar economic changes, the emergence of the Cold War, and the looming threat of atomic annihilation. In this sociopolitical and cultural context, concerned adults began to cast the fate of the postwar world onto children, in particular boys.

In the decade and a half immediately following World War II, the version of boyhood that became the ideal was one that stressed selflessness, togetherness, honesty, fearlessness, frank determination, and emotional toughness. It was thought that investing boys with this version of masculinity was essential if they were to grow into the kind of citizens capable of governing, protecting, and defending the nation, and, of course, maintaining and regulating the social order.

Drawing on a wide variety of sources, Ontario Boys demonstrates that, although girls were expected and encouraged to internalize a “special kind” of citizenship, as caregivers and educators of children and nurturers of men, the gendered content and language employed indicated that active public citizenship and democracy was intended for boys. An “appropriate” boyhood in the postwar period became, if nothing else, a metaphor for the survival of the nation.

Ottawa Cover

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Ottawa

Making a Capital - Constuire une capitale

Edited by / Sous la direction de Jeff Keshen and Nicole St-Onge

Ottawa - Making a Capital is a collection of 24 never-before published essays in English and in French on the history of Ottawa. It brings together leading historians, archeologists and archivists whose work reveals the rich tapestry of the city. Pre-contact society, French Canadian voyageurs, the early civil service, the first labour organizers and Jewish peddlers are among the many fascinating topics covered. Readers will also learn about the origins of local street names, the Great Fire of 1900, Ottawa's multicultural past, the demise of its streetcar system, Ottawa's transformation during the Second World War and the significance of federal government architecture. This book is an indispensable collection for those interested in local history and the history of Canada's capital.

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