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China Diary

The Life of Mary Austin Endicott

Mary Austin was a mayor’s daughter who expected to live an uneventful life in Canada. But when she said “I do” to Jim Endicott she found that she had “married China.”

Thrust into extraordinary circumstances, but undeterred by the political turmoil around her in China, Mary Austin Endicott determined she would achieve the goals she set for herself. She bore and raised four children, ran a one-room school and became the foster mother to three Chinese boys, despite the raised eyebrows of many of her fellow missionaries.

The family moved back to Canada, but it wasn’t long before Jim, who was becoming a well-known peace activist, returned to wartorn China. Mary, by then a school trustee, continued her fight for teachers’ rights and focussed her energy on increased activity in left-wing politics, all the while separated from Jim and grieving for a marriage she felt to be in jeopardy.

Mary and Jim were finally reunited in 1947 in the police state Shanghai had become. She used all her energy and faith in that time to help Jim regain his equilibrium. For thousands of readers her book Five Stars over China countered the common practice during the Cold War of vilifying the Chinese Revolution. Then her greatest crisis came: Jim was accused of treason.

Shirley Jane Endicott has presented us with a fascinating account of her mother’s life, based on Mary Austin Endicott’s private writings and flavoured with Shirley’s memories. She brings to life the story of an exceptional woman whose life was shaped by profound political and historical circumstances.

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The Dominion of Youth

Adolescence and the Making of Modern Canada, 1920 to 1950

Adolescence, like childhood, is more than a biologically defined life stage: it is also a sociohistorical construction. The meaning and experience of adolescence are reformulated according to societal needs, evolving scientific precepts, and national aspirations relative to historic conditions. Although adolescence was by no means a “discovery” of the early twentieth century, it did assume an identifiably modern form during the years between the Great War and 1950.

The Dominion of Youth: Adolescence and the Making of Modern Canada, 1920 to 1950 captures what it meant for young Canadians to inhabit this liminal stage of life within the context of a young nation caught up in the self-formation and historic transformation that would make modern Canada. Because the young at this time were seen paradoxically as both the hope of the nation and the source of its possible degeneration, new policies and institutions were developed to deal with the “problem of youth.” This history considers how young Canadians made the transition to adulthood during a period that was “developmental”—both for youth and for a nation also working toward individuation. During the years considered here, those who occupied this “dominion” of youth would see their experiences more clearly demarcated by generation and culture than ever before. With this book, Cynthia Comacchio offers the first detailed study of adolescence in early-twentieth-century Canada and demonstrates how young Canadians of the period became the nation’s first modern teenagers.

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Entre le social et le national

Le « moment 68 » et la réinvention de l’Acadie

Joel Belliveau

La distance et les barrières linguistiques n’ont pu empêcher le mouvement étudiant nord-américain de former une incarnation locale en terre acadienne, culminant dans une participation enthousiasme au « moment 1968 » planétaire, avec une saveur originale toutefois, qui changera profondément la culture politique de cette minorité linguistique.
–Lionel Groulx, 1935

Quatre notables acadiens reçus tels des chefs d’État par Charles de Gaulle au Palais de l’Élysée. Plus de 2000 personnes qui manifestent dans les rues de Moncton scandant « on veut du français! ». Une confrontation très publique à l’hôtel de ville entre quatre jeunes résolus et un maire francophobe. Une tête de cochon déposée sur le seuil de sa maison en guise de protestation. L’occupation du plus grand bâtiment de l’Université de Moncton par des étudiants armés de boyaux d’arrosage. Voilà quelques images fortes héritées des « années ‘68 » en Acadie, des images qui se sont ancrées avec force dans l’imaginaire acadien.

Le présent ouvrage relate l’histoire du mouvement étudiant de Moncton, qui a été, toutes proportions gardées, l’un des plus importants au Canada durant les années 1960. La dimension nationaliste de ce mouvement était déjà relativement bien connue; aussi, la contribution la plus importante de cet ouvrage est qu’il ancre cette histoire dans celle de la Nouvelle Gauche nord-américaine, permettant une meilleure compréhension de sa genèse et de sa nature. Mettant en relation les actions et paroles de ces étudiants acadiens avec ceux du Québec, du Canada anglophone, des États-Unis et d’au-delà, il explore comment, dans la diffusion d’idées, le mondial et le local se rejoignent.

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First Nations, Identity, and Reserve Life

The Mi'kmaq of Nova Scotia

Simone Poliandri

Issues of identity figure prominently in Native North American communities, mediating their histories, traditions, culture, and status. This is certainly true of the Mi’kmaw people of Nova Scotia, whose lives on reserves create highly complex economic, social, political, and spiritual realities. This ethnography investigates identity construction and negotiations among the Mi’kmaq, as well as the role of identity dynamics in Mi’kmaw social relationships on and off the reserve. Featuring direct testimonies from over sixty individuals, this work offers a vivid firsthand perspective on contemporary Mi’kmaw reserve life.

Simone Poliandri begins First Nations, Identity, and Reserve Life with a search for the criteria used by the Mi’kmaq to construct their identities, which are traced within the context of their different perceptions of community, tradition, spirituality, relationship with the Catholic Church, and the recent reevaluation of the iconic figure of late activist Annie Mae Aquash. Building on the notions of self-identification and ascribed identity as the primary components of identity, Poliandri argues that placing others at specific locations within the social landscape of their communities allows the Mi’kmaq to define and reinforce their own spaces by way of association, contrast, or both. This identification of others highlights Mi’kmaw people’s agency in shaping and monitoring the representations of their identities. With its theoretical insights, this richly textured ethnography will enhance understanding of identity dynamics among Indigenous communities even as it illuminates the unique nature of the Mi’kmaw people.

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From Meteorite Impact to Constellation City

A Historical Geography of Greater Sudbury

From Meteorite Impact to Constellation City is a historical geography of the City of Greater Sudbury. The story that began billions of years ago encompasses dramatic physical and human events. Among them are volcanic eruptions, two meteorite impacts, the ebb and flow of continental glaciers, Aboriginal occupancy, exploration and mapping by Europeans, exploitation by fur traders and Canadian lumbermen and American entrepreneurs, the rise of global mining giants, unionism, pollution and re-greening, and the creation of a unique constellation city of 160,000.

The title posits the book’s two main themes, one physical in nature and the other human: the great meteorite impact of some 1.85 billion years ago and the development of Sudbury from its inception in 1883. Unlike other large centres in Canada that exhibit a metropolitan form of development with a core and surrounding suburbs, Sudbury developed in a pattern resembling a cluster of stars of differing sizes.

Many of Sudbury’s most characteristic attributes are undergoing transformation. Its rocky terrain and the negative impact from mining companies are giving way to attractive neighbourhoods and the planting of millions of trees. Greater Sudbury’s blue-collar image as a union powerhouse in a one-industry town is also changing; recent advances in the fields of health, education, retailing, and the local and international mining supply and services sector have greatly diversified its employment base. This book shows how Sudbury evolved from a village to become the regional centre for northeastern Ontario and a global model for economic diversification and environmental rehabilitation.

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The Great War

From Memory to History

The Great War: From Memory to History offers a new look at the multiple ways the Great War has been remembered and commemorated through the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. Drawing on contributions from history, cultural studies, film, and literary studies this collection offers fresh perspectives on the Great War and its legacy at the local, national, and international levels. More importantly, it showcases exciting new research on the experiences and memories of “forgotten” participants who have often been ignored in dominant narratives or national histories.

Contributors to this international study highlight the transnational character of memory-making in the Great War’s aftermath. No single memory of the war has prevailed, but many symbols, rituals, and expressions of memory connect seemingly disparate communities and wartime experiences. With groundbreaking new research on the role of Aboriginal peoples, ethnic minorities, women, artists, historians, and writers in shaping these expressions of memory, this book will be of great interest to readers from a variety of national and academic backgrounds.

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Hélier, fils des bois

Jamais réédité depuis sa parution dans les années 1930, ce grand roman de Marie Le Franc – par ailleurs récipiendaire du prix Femina en 1927 – apparaît au lecteur d’aujourd’hui comme la première incursion littéraire féminine dans la forêt nordique. Cette oeuvre déploie un fascinant imaginaire de la forêt, ici celui du lac Tremblant dans les Laurentides, qui se nourrit des paysages découverts lors des nombreux séjours de la romancière et des sensations vécues au contact d’une nature qui, sans être totalement hostile à l’être humain, n’en demeure pas moins extrêmement difficile à habiter. La radicale altérité de la forêt, qui se joue de rapports intimes et intérieurs, renforce l’intérêt contemporain pour cette oeuvre.

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Histoires d'immigrations au Québec

Afin d’inscrire les nouveaux arrivants dans notre mémoire collective, 14 histoires s’enchaînent selon les grandes vagues d’immigration qui ont transformé le tissu humain du Québec, du milieu du xixe siècle à nos jours. Partez à la rencontre de 14 communautés culturelles – écossaise, irlandaise, italienne, juive yiddishophone, polonaise, juive sépharade, grecque, portugaise, haïtienne, latino-américaine, asiatique du Sud-Est, libanaise, subsaharienne et maghrébine – qui ont construit le Québec, et Montréal en particulier. Chaque récit historique est accompagné d’extraits du témoignage d’un membre de la communauté concernée, dont l’ancien premier ministre Pierre Marc Johnson et les artistes Kim Thúy, Bernard Adamus et Lynda Thalie. Pour rendre le portrait encore plus vivant, une riche iconographie des quartiers et des édifices où se sont rassemblées les communautés, ainsi que des individus qui ont eu une action déterminante sur leur groupe, est proposée. Toutes ces trames migratoires inscrites dans la trame québécoise, liant l’histoire nationale à l’histoire internationale, viennent attester, d’une certaine façon, que l’universel s’atteint par le particulier.

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“I Want to Join Your Club”

Letters from Rural Children, 1900-1920

“I am a girl, 13 years old, and a proper broncho buster. I can cook and do housework, but I just love to ride.”

In letters written to the children’s pages of newspapers, we hear the clear and authentic voices of real children who lived in rural Canada and Newfoundland between 1900 and 1920. Children tell us about their families, their schools, jobs and communities and the suffering caused by the terrible costs of World War I.

We read of shared common experiences of isolation, hard work, few amenities, limited educational opportunities, restricted social life and heavy responsibilities, but also of satisfaction over skills mastered and work performed. Though often hard, children’s lives reflected a hopeful and expanding future, and their letters recount their skills and determination as well as family lore and community histories.

Children both make and participate in history, but until recently their role has been largely ignored. In “I Want to Join Your Club,” Lewis provides direct evidence that children’s lives, like adults’, have both continuity and change and form part of the warp and woof of the social fabric.

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Les sciences sociales au Canada

50 ans d’activités à l’échelle nationale par la Fédération canadienne des sciences sociales

Ce livre, Les sciences sociales au Canada, est écrit sur le contexte et l’histoire de la Fédération canadienne des sciences sociales, en l’honneur de ses cinquante années d’acitvity nationale.

II est clair que la federation et les organismes qui font précédée, ont exerce une énorme influence sur l’evolution des sciences sociales canadiennes au cours des cinquante dernières années. L’histoire de l’organisme constitue sans doute le meilleur barometre des changements qui se sont produits dans les relations entre la societe canadienne et les specialistes des sciences sociales.

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